Tuesday, July 28th 2009

AMD Delivers ATI FirePro V8750, Its Most Powerful Professional 3D Graphics Card

To meet the extreme productivity needs of today's CAD, Digital Content Creation (DCC) and oil and gas professionals, AMD announces that the ATI FirePro V8750 3D workstation graphics accelerator is joining the AMD line of ultra high-end professional graphics hardware.

ATI FirePro V8750 3D workstation graphics accelerator brings the highest number of shader engines (800) with the highest memory bandwidth (115.2 GB/s) in the entire 3D professional graphics offerings today1 which enables professionals to render incredibly complex models and photo-realistic images in real-time.

The ultra parallel processing architecture of the ATI FirePro V8750 3D workstation graphics accelerator maximizes throughput by automatically directing graphics horsepower where it's needed. Intelligent management of computational resources enables enhanced utilization of the GPU to enable real-time rendering of complex models and scenes with high frame rates when animating. This acceleration is accessed through ATI Stream technology, a set of advanced hardware and software technologies that enable a system to dynamically balance workloads by tapping a both the CPU and a GPU in a workstation to enable accelerated application performance.

With ATI FirePro V8750 3D workstation graphics accelerator, applications that take advantage of the shader units and memory bandwidth perform significantly better than with competing solutions. For example, UG NX4 software from Siemens PLM performs up to 56 percent faster and Autodesk 3ds Max OGL runs 118 percent faster on ATI FirePro V8750 than the comparable competing solution.

Featuring 2 GB of GDDR5 frame buffer memory, engineers and designers are free to focus on project work without concerns for memory limitations that have traditionally impacted professional applications.

ATI FirePro V8750 3D workstation graphics accelerator offers thirty percent more bandwidth than the comparable competing solution, and it's equipped with the latest memory technology, GDDR5, for superior bandwidth and power consumption.

Two DisplayPort outputs, one Dual Link enabled DVI output and one Stereo sync output provide versatility and advanced features needed for advanced monitors and a high resolution support. In addition, with native multi-card support, users can see more and do more using four displays by adding a second ATI FirePro 3D graphics accelerator in the same workstation.

ATI FirePro 3D workstation graphics accelerators have more than 90 certifications from independent software vendors and have undergone extensive testing to provide industry standard reliability. Concurrent with this product launch, AMD is also announcing the availability of ATI CrossFire Pro technology which enables users to combine the power of two discrete graphics cards to scale their application performance for maximum productivity. This capability which simply involves coupling the two graphics cards using an interconnect cable, is designed to provide a significant performance boost to CAD and DCC applications such as UG NX, Ensight, Maya and Teamcenter. In addition to ATI FirePro V8750, ATI CrossFire Pro is planned for availability on the mid-range and above graphics cards including ATI FirePro V5700, ATI FirePro V7750, and ATI FirePro V87003D workstation graphics accelerators. Initial support is provided for Windows XP (32-bit and 64-bit) with support for other operating systems scheduled to follow in the second half of 2009.

"Digital content creation and high end CAD users have been held hostage to high-priced solutions for advanced rendering," said Janet Matsuda, senior director, AMD Professional Graphics. "The ATI FirePro V8750 3D workstation graphics accelerator delivers unparalleled performance and two GB of frame buffer memory for less than $1,800 MSRP. Creative and engineering professionals can now afford the powerful graphics they deserve."

"We're amazed at the performance boost to our already fast MachStudio Pro real-time 3D workflow and rendering product with the new ATI FirePro V8750 3D workstation graphics accelerator," said David Koenig, CEO, StudioGPU. "Powered by the new ATI FirePro workstation graphics accelerator, the MachStudio Pro non-linear real-time 3D finishing workflow enables design firms and 3D artists everywhere to power through big, complex projects amazingly fast. Thanks to the ATI graphic accelerators, small and mid-size studios can now work at the speed of thought to streamline workflow in a way that was impossible for the largest and most fully equipped production facilities as little as a year ago."

The new ATI FirePro V87503D workstation graphics accelerator is available now at the MSRP of $1,799. ATI FirePro graphics accelerators are available from OEMs, system integrators and channel partners worldwide.
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27 Comments on AMD Delivers ATI FirePro V8750, Its Most Powerful Professional 3D Graphics Card

#1
MrAlex
Jeez it's about time! I'd thought they'd have released it the same time as the 4890.
Posted on Reply
#2

Never ever heard of a pro gpu lineup from ATI - a market completely dominated by matrox cards? I cant comment, obviously, as I dont go into working situations using such tech.
#3
alexp999
Staff
FirePros have been around for years. They are usually just rebranded desktop GPUs, with driver better optimized for workstation tasks. NVIDIA does the same

This looks like no exception just a re-branded RV780/RV790
Posted on Reply
#4
ShiBDiB
by: alexp999
FirePros have been around for years. They are usually just rebranded desktop GPUs, with driver better optimized for workstation tasks. NVIDIA does the same

This looks like no exception just a re-branded RV780/RV790
that sells for 1500 more
Posted on Reply
#5
arroyo
I think most of $$$ is spend on license stuff in driver (certificate for AutoCAD, Maya...).
Posted on Reply
#6
legends84
$1,799??wth.. i could buy a new rig with that:)
Posted on Reply
#7
HalfAHertz
They are supposedly more reliable and long lasting and more optimised for CAD software on a hardware level, plus usually come with a ton of Vmem.

People report similar performance with softmodded drivers
Posted on Reply
#8
SNiiPE_DoGG
I have a v8700 here at work --- it blows the 4870 miles out of the water in PRO/E performance (cad) like 3.5x faster
Posted on Reply
#9
toyo
Yeah, but hardware is the same, only BIOS and driver are different. AMD&Nvidia are some very greedy sobs when coming to selling these "pro" cards... they capitalize on the naiveté of the consumer.
Posted on Reply
#10
SNiiPE_DoGG
by: toyo
Yeah, but hardware is the same, only BIOS and driver are different. AMD&Nvidia are some very greedy sobs when coming to selling these "pro" cards... they capitalize on the naiveté of the consumer.
ummm, no.

these cards have optimized drivers for the CAD packages and 3d rendering programs out there that require a very in depth specialized approach to develop and support. Its not like these cards are selling millions like their gaming/consumer bretheren, they are selling in a number more appropriately counted thousands and as such they command a premium for their specialization
Posted on Reply
#11
alexp999
Staff
Basically as has been previously said, the money you pay for a workstation card goes into the software/drivers as opposed to the actual hardware itself.

So it does feel like a bit of a rip, but when you think about it, it isnt really. Your just paying for something immaterial.
Posted on Reply
#12
Solaris17
Creator Solaris Utility DVD
by: alexp999
Basically as has been previously said, the money you pay for a workstation card goes into the software/drivers as opposed to the actual hardware itself.

So it does feel like a bit of a rip, but when you think about it, it isnt really. Your just paying for something immaterial.
untrue the drivers mare diffirent yes but did you know that other than vmem these cards are actually physically diffirent? someone mentioned softmodded drivers before and while that is true it simpy emulates the code in a software mode consumer cards are actually locked to not be able to do what these cards can on a physical level.
Posted on Reply
#13
SNiiPE_DoGG
by: Solaris17
untrue the drivers mare diffirent yes but did you know that other than vmem these cards are actually physically diffirent? someone mentioned softmodded drivers before and while that is true it simpy emulates the code in a software mode consumer cards are actually locked to not be able to do what these cards can on a physical level.
nah its the same card on a physical level, you cant cross flash them though because the firepro has a microcode on the bios chip that bricks it when using the wrong bios. with the 7750 cards (rv670, still very good workstation perf) you can crossflash a 3870 to a 7750 though.
Posted on Reply
#14
Solaris17
Creator Solaris Utility DVD
by: SNiiPE_DoGG
nah its the same card on a physical level, you cant cross flash them though because the firepro has a microcode on the bios chip that bricks it when using the wrong bios. with the 7750 cards (rv670, still very good workstation perf) you can crossflash a 3870 to a 7750 though.
intresting i know both companys used to physically disable openGL rendering on the physical card i guess they dont anymore my mistake.
Posted on Reply
#15
douglatins
Of course pro cards are expensive, people use it to make money, while gaming cards are only for game, the price is absolutely fair
Posted on Reply
#16
aj28
by: alexp999
So it does feel like a bit of a rip, but when you think about it, it isnt really. Your just paying for something immaterial.
Exactly. These companies shell out a massive amount of cash for licenses to the software they use, so comparatively speaking the cost of this type of hardware is just a drop in the bucket.

When it comes to business, time is money, and by saving time with high-end workstation hardware, you're saving significantly more money than you're investing. Not so much with gaming rigs, where 10 FPS is worth pennies to most of us, even if it is a 25% increase over our previous-gen card. However, when 25% means saving hours on rendering time, the analysis is very, very different...
Posted on Reply
#18
Scrizz
by: kyle2020
Never ever heard of a pro gpu lineup from ATI - a market completely dominated by matrox cards? I cant comment, obviously, as I dont go into working situations using such tech.
show's how much u know :laugh: :slap:
Posted on Reply
#19
TheGuruStud
by: Scrizz
show's how much u know :laugh: :slap:
I was like matrox cards :wtf: Have those even been popular since windows 95 :laugh:
The triple head is/was pretty cool, but that's about it, IMO.
Posted on Reply
#20
Meecrob
by: Solaris17
interesting i know both companies used to physically disable openGL rendering on the physical card i guess they dont anymore my mistake.
Only Nvidia has ever laser cut the chips to disable stuff, for ATI its always been software based on the firegl/firepro.

On older Nvidia cards u could just cross flash them or use hacked drivers, OR in the case of the geforce 1 and 2 cards, you could just move a resistor(Easy peezy) and turn any of them into a quadro, I did it alot, sold the cards to small companies that couldnt really afford to pay full price for a stack of quadro's :)

by: TheGuruStud
I was like matrox cards :wtf: Have those even been popular since windows 95 :laugh:
The triple head is/was pretty cool, but that's about it, IMO.
Matrox is still around, they are just not in the gaming market so most people here havent seen anything they make for many years, Their cards are still damn good for the jobs they are made to do, utterly useless for gaming but hey, thats not their target.
Posted on Reply
#21
Solaris17
Creator Solaris Utility DVD
by: Meecrob
Only Nvidia has ever laser cut the chips to disable stuff, for ATI its always been software based on the firegl/firepro.

On older Nvidia cards u could just cross flash them or use hacked drivers, OR in the case of the geforce 1 and 2 cards, you could just move a resistor(Easy peezy) and turn any of them into a quadro, I did it alot, sold the cards to small companies that couldnt really afford to pay full price for a stack of quadro's :)



Matrox is still around, they are just not in the gaming market so most people here havent seen anything they make for many years, Their cards are still damn good for the jobs they are made to do, utterly useless for gaming but hey, thats not their target.
do you have links for this and the cards supported? i have a few 1 and 2 cards i bealive would be fun to mod
Posted on Reply
#23
twicksisted
i think the real important question to ask here is will it run crysis :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#24
hat
Enthusiast
by: twicksisted
i think the real important question to ask here is will it run crysis :laugh:
This card would be creating crysis.
Posted on Reply
#25
twicksisted
yeah i was kidding :D
just remembering all those posts over the last 2 years... "can it play crysis"
Posted on Reply
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