Wednesday, November 18th 2009

Patriot Announces the Release of their PS-100 Series SSDs

Patriot Memory, a global pioneer in high-performance memory, NAND flash and computer technology, today announced the release of their new PS-100 Series SSDs.

The PS-100 is the latest in Patriot's "cache" based SSD drives and has been targeted for cost-conscious consumers pursuing performance and reliability without having to empty their bank account. The 2.5" SSD makes use of a 64MB cache, power consumption of 5.3W when operating, and .5W when in standby mode; an option that is sure to attract notebook and laptop users alike. The PS-100 boosts sequential read speeds of up to 210MB/s, with sequential write speeds up to 150MB/s, another feature that will be attractive to end users. The low power consumption of the PS-100 drives extends battery life on notebooks and netbooks while the performance reduces system boot times and application load times improving overall system responsiveness.

"Our PS-100 is a great option for consumers that want all the reliability and performance of an SSD, but are looking for aggressive pricing," say Eric Ackerson, Patriot's Director of Marketing. "We are excited about getting this product into the market just in time for the holiday season, and with capacities from 32GB to 256GB, the PS-100 family brings improved system performance and longevity with a broad range of capacities and price points."
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10 Comments on Patriot Announces the Release of their PS-100 Series SSDs

#1
TheLostSwede
I take it you mean 64MB cache, not 64GB? :D
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#2
DanishDevil
I'll take a 128 GB if they're reasonably priced :roll:
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#3
AlCabone
5.3W power consumption when operating and it's supposed to be power efficient. Or does it consume this much only while doing read or write operations?
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#4
buggalugs
could this thing save my datas?
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#5
pantherx12
by: buggalugs
could this thing save my datas?
Only if you have compatible gigahertz :laugh:
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#6
PP Mguire
by: AlCabone
5.3W power consumption when operating and it's supposed to be power efficient. Or does it consume this much only while doing read or write operations?
Compare that to the fastest mechanical drive we have to offer to combat SSDs...Velociraptor. 5.3w is nothing considering if you browsing the internet your drive is in standby most of the time. I guess you missed the part where it said .5w in standby.
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#7
AlCabone
by: PP Mguire
Compare that to the fastest mechanical drive we have to offer to combat SSDs...Velociraptor. 5.3w is nothing considering if you browsing the internet your drive is in standby most of the time. I guess you missed the part where it said .5w in standby.
from the article:
power consumption of 5.3W when operating, and .5W when in standby mode; an option that is sure to attract notebook and laptop users alike.
I didn't know about Velociraptors being marketed for the mobile segment. I didn't miss the point about standby power consumption but I'm not sure what stand-by means for an SSD. Is it sitting in stand-by all the time while not doing read/write or does it go into stand-by after a certain amount of idle time?
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#8
Mussels
Moderprator
standard 7200RPM HDD's (3.5") use anywhere from 5-15W depending on how many platters they have

most 2.5" drives must be a lot less than that, since many that i've used work fine with power over USB2.0 (supposed to be 500ma, but then again my keyboard with all the LED's on at max uses 1500ma max and i've used it on many PC's without issue)
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#9
Baum
then it's poo to call it power efficient :-)

i am still waiting for a "slow" 80MB/s "value" ssd that saves energy and my money but beats 32GB and is sata :-) usefull for all those hdd based netbooks
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#10
xenos
As SSD's go, 5W is very high.

A typical 2.5 inch drive can get under the 2.5W envelope (500mA x 5V = 2.5W - USB) just.

A modern 3.5 inch hard drive will be about 6-12W depending on platters etc, a Raptor slightly more I think (certainly the old Raptors are about 15W)

The 34nm Intel SSD drives (80GB one from memory anyway) uses 150mW (0.15W) active and 75mW idle.

Tell me again the Patriot drive isn't high?

@AlCabone - I would assume idle/active refers to instantaneous idle, is the computer currently writing to the disk (case HDD light activity), if not then its idle... So its probably idle quite a lot on something like Windows 7.
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