Thursday, January 14th 2010

VIA Debuts Vinyl Envy VT1730 USB 2.0 Audio Controller

VIA Technologies, Inc., a leading provider of PC and prosumer audio silicon, today unveiled the VIA Vinyl Envy VT1730 USB 2.0 Audio Controller, the industry's first highly-integrated single chip solution that leverages the broad USB 2.0 bandwidth (480 Mb/s) to deliver uncompromised audio quality.

The VIA Envy VT1730 is an 8-channel, 24-bit/192kHz audio controller specifically designed to achieve cinema-quality audio recording and playback in high fidelity USB and MIDI system applications. Whether it's using the bandwidth capacity of USB 2.0 to simultaneously support audio streams from a guitar, bass, keyboard and microphone, or delivering true-to-life sound to multiple speakers in a home theatre set-up, the VIA Envy VT1730 offers outstanding audio performance and impressive application flexibility.

Providing a smooth interface between USB, analog and digital audio devices, the VIA Envy VT1730 is ideal for USB sound cards, headphones, audio hubs, recording consoles, and MIDI devices that require the streaming of considerable audio data between a host system and audio I/O system via the USB interface.

"Over 10 years of experience in the audio component industry and extensive knowledge of peripheral interfaces has enabled this technology breakthrough," said Richard Brown, Vice President of Marketing, VIA Technologies, Inc. "Audio enrichment, through our successful VIA Vinyl Audio line of controllers and codecs, has long been a core element of VIA's multimedia product focus, and the VIA Envy VT1730 further extends our reach beyond the PC into high-end audio systems."

Notably, the VIA Envy VT1730 also supports the I²S standard enabling Blu-ray Disc audio content protection; solutions without this feature dramatically reduce audio quality to that of a regular CD, with a sampling rate of only 16-bit/48kHz.

For further information on the VIA Vinyl Envy VT1730, please visit the VIA website here.
Add your own comment

15 Comments on VIA Debuts Vinyl Envy VT1730 USB 2.0 Audio Controller

#1
AsphyxiA
cool, the envy chip is pretty good.
Posted on Reply
#2
Mussels
Moderprator
last time i used a USB 5.1 soundcard, it couldnt do anything above 16 bit 44Khz in 5.1 mode, because of lack of bandwidth. I dont see this doing any better.
Posted on Reply
#3
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: Mussels
last time i used a USB 5.1 soundcard, it couldnt do anything above 16 bit 44Khz in 5.1 mode, because of lack of bandwidth. I dont see this doing any better.
Probably that was USB 1.1. This one is Blu-ray capable (24-bit, 192 kHz).
Posted on Reply
#4
Mussels
Moderprator
by: btarunr
Probably that was USB 1.1. This one is Blu-ray capable (24-bit, 192 kHz).
it was 2.0, and creative. live 24 bit external, i think.
Posted on Reply
#5
toyo
If you really want 24/192 5.1 output (but why... 24 bit, ok, but 192 kHz sample rate... there are lots of very pro studios that never venture beyond 24/96, and they have perfectly treated rooms to allow them to hear the quality jump from 44,1 or 48k to 96k), it's better you just buy a firewire above-entry-level audio interface. I didn't use it, but Focusrite Saffire is like 200$ and can do much more than just playback... USB 3.0 should be the end of Firewire though...
Posted on Reply
#6
Mussels
Moderprator
actually... looking at the connectivity in the pic, its definately not aimed at us (gamers)
Posted on Reply
#7
Steevo
This is great untill it gets cripped by Vista or 7's audio handler. Then it sucks just as much as all the others.
Posted on Reply
#8
justanerd
by: Steevo
... untill it gets cripped by Vista or 7's audio handler.
Sad but I must agree on that.

But back to this item. I really wonder what the homes of the hardware developpers look like, since I wonder why there's no plugs soldered on top and bottom aswell.
Cubic cabling might even look more stunning whereas this one only allows to give you a spider alike look when being connected to various devices.
This really makes it incompatible to any location I could think of. Prototyping results normally look like this.
Posted on Reply
#9
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
lol that board was produced by asus
Posted on Reply
#10
hat
Maximum Overclocker


Where's the USB? I see optical, serial, and those really old keyboard hookups... whatever it was that came before PS/2
Posted on Reply
#11
Mussels
Moderprator
next to the serial port, is a mini USB connector. bottom right.
Posted on Reply
#12
RejZoR
Hehe, those round PS/2 look a like connectors aren't PS/2 connectors. They are cannon connectors or XLR connectors. Mostly used by musicians and their audio equipment.
Posted on Reply
#13
Mussels
Moderprator
by: RejZoR
Hehe, those round PS/2 look a like connectors aren't PS/2 connectors. They are cannon connectors or XLR connectors. Mostly used by musicians and their audio equipment.
the name he was looking for was AT keyboard connectors.


I have an adaptor around here somewhere for one of those plugs to 3 RCA, so while i have no idea what they're called - i do know they're high end (and antique :P) audio plugs
Posted on Reply
#14
Baum
XLR, DIN, DIN-AT what ever those are we should remember this Serial connection for hacking ^^

apart from that go via go! i would love to have proper 5.1 Analog to usb as Laptop servers my needs
Posted on Reply
#15
jjFarking
Those are MIDI DINs (MIDI connectors) ;)
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment