Monday, February 1st 2010

Transcend Releases High-Density 8GB DDR3 Registered DIMM

Transcend Information Inc., a worldwide leader in storage and multimedia products, is proud to announce its launch of 8GB DDR3-1066 Registered DIMM (RDIMM) and 4GB DDR3-1333 VLP (Very Low Profile) RDIMM modules. Featuring enhanced capacity, support for triple-channel memory configurations, and an onboard thermal sensor, these new high-density RDIMMs provide customers with cutting-edge support for higher data frequencies and significantly increase memory space.

As Transcend’s highest density DDR3 module, the 8GB DDR3-1066 RDIMM is constructed with a robust ten-layer PCB that offers stable performance and durability, and also includes a high thermal efficiency aluminum heat sink to help maintain cool temperatures under load. Offering memory bandwidth up to 8.5GB/s and the flexibility to expand maximum capacity to 48GB (per processor), the 8GB DDR3-1066 RDIMM module allows administrators to create a robust infrastructure that runs memory-intensive applications such as virtualization and cloud computing with ease.

Small yet powerful, Transcend’s 4GB DDR3-1333 VLP RDIMM is a mere 0.74 inches high—compact enough to fit into space-restricted cases, 1U height rack systems or blade servers. When used with the triple-channel architecture built into Intel’s newest Nehalem-based Xeon server platforms, Transcend’s DDR3-1333 VLP RDIMMs enable system administrators to maximize memory bandwidth, providing up to 10.6GB/s for optimal application performance.

All of Transcend’s DDR3-1333/1066 RDIMMs fully comply with JEDEC (Joint Electron Device Engineering Council) standards and are built with 256Mx8 high-quality DDR3 FBGA chips for their improved electrical and heat dissipation characteristics. Backed by Transcend’s lifetime warranty, these new DDR3 RDIMM modules offer unparalleled reliability for high-end servers and heavily loaded workstations.
Add your own comment

9 Comments on Transcend Releases High-Density 8GB DDR3 Registered DIMM

#1

hmmm...just 1066 and 1333??? Even DDR2 can manage that freqs! I was kinda hoping from something more serious from Transcend, especially since their DDR2-1066 and DDR2-1200 are top products.
#2
MrAlex
by: TAViX
hmmm...just 1066 and 1333??? Even DDR2 can manage that freqs! I was kinda hoping from something more serious from Transcend, especially since their DDR2-1066 and DDR2-1200 are top products.
You do realise that it's a single module of 8GB DDR3 RAM, right?
Posted on Reply
#3
buggalugs
Wow 8 Gbs? I saw some 4 Gb sticks for like $250 so these will be expensive.
Posted on Reply
#4

by: MrAlex
You do realize that it's a single module of 8GB DDR3 RAM, right?
I do, hehe! :cool:
#5
xrealm20
Insane! Great for VM Hosts -- 48GB x 2 = 96GB ram max in one box....
Posted on Reply
#6
Jizzler
^ I'll to let GoDaddy know... help improve the performance of my VPS ;)


As for the speed, while a lot of the boards I see will support 1 or 2 DPC (DIMMs per channel) @ 1333, that's only with dual-rank sticks. Use of quad-rank memory, even at 1 DPC, means 1066 operation.

Crucial has some 8GB 1333 DR memory, if you have the appropriate model Xeon and a need for mass amount of memory at that speed.
Posted on Reply
#7
TheLaughingMan
I am finally getting what I wanted. And people called me crazy when I posted that we would see 16 and 32 GB sets by the end of 2010. Who is laughing now....not me because I have a bad cough.
Posted on Reply
#8

by: TheLaughingMan
I am finally getting what I wanted. And people called me crazy when I posted that we would see 16 and 32 GB sets by the end of 2010. Who is laughing now....not me because I have a bad cough.
In did. It's the beginning of 2010 and we already have 24GB sets and even 32 if you use 4 of them. The problem is the price, and the absolutely no use for the average Joe right now. I mean 4GB or 6 are more than enough for today's apps.
#9
Wile E
Power User
by: TAViX
In did. It's the beginning of 2010 and we already have 24GB sets and even 32 if you use 4 of them. The problem is the price, and the absolutely no use for the average Joe right now. I mean 4GB or 6 are more than enough for today's apps.
These are registered DIMMs. Average joes don't use the server hardware needed to take advantage of this anyway.
Posted on Reply