Monday, February 22nd 2010

Seagate Ships Industry's First 2TB 6Gb/s SAS Enterprise Drive

Seagate is now shipping its 3.5-inch Constellation ES drive, the industry’s first 2TB enterprise-class drives featuring 6Gb SAS, to customers worldwide. Designed specifically for multi-drive nearline storage environments, the Constellation ES drive has been qualified by leading enterprise OEMs and system builders who demand storage solutions of the highest capacities with increased power efficiency, enterprise-class reliability, and data security that their customers demand. The Constellation ES drive leverages Seagate’s 30 years of leadership in meeting large enterprise customer needs in product development, qualification, and support.

The fourth-generation, 3.5-inch Seagate Constellation ES drive family for 7200-RPM enterprise environments enables cost-effective, highly efficient storage with capacities of 500GB, 1TB and 2TB. Supporting up to 76TB per square foot, it offers best-in-class reliability, leading 6Gb/s SAS or SATA 3Gb/s performance, PowerChoice optimized power and cooling technology, and a government-grade security option – all backed by Seagate.

“Nearline is the fastest growing segment in enterprise storage and Seagate is committed to meeting the market demands of its OEM and system integrator partners in this space,” said Carla Kennedy, vice president, Seagate Enterprise Product Line Management. “Seagate’s leadership in technology development, volume manufacturing and supply chain execution has resulted in an exemplary next-generation nearline solution. The Constellation ES drive tackles the concerns of shrinking IT budgets, floor space constraints and energy consumption, efficiently and cost-effectively.”
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15 Comments on Seagate Ships Industry's First 2TB 6Gb/s SAS Enterprise Drive

#1
Easo
Supporting up to 76TB per square foot.
LOL WTF... I, of course, understand what it means, buuut, isnt it a little bit stupid as specification?
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#2
W1zzard
wait till they say you can store 328946328946328476 PB in a cubic light year of these hdds.

math anyone? how many 3.5" hdds in a cubic light year?
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#3
Munki
by: W1zzard
wait till they say you can store 328946328946328476 PB in a cubic light year of these hdds
:laugh: Your going to need a Doctoral in engineering to read the specifications.
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#5
W1zzard
measured hdd: 14.5 x 2.5 x 10.2 cm

cm³ volume: 369.75 cm³

in m³: 0.00037 m³

lightyear³ / hdd volume: (8.46732407 * (10^47)) / 0.00037 = 2.28846596 × 10^51

# of hdds * 2 TB per disk: 2.2 * (10^51) * 2 000 * (10^9) = 4.4 × 10^63

4.4x10^63 bytes are ?

conversion to PB: 4.4x10^(63-15) = 4.4x10^48 PB
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#6
Munki
by: W1zzard
14.5 x 2.5 x 10.2 cm

369.75 cm³

0.00037 m³
Wow you managed to give me a brain tumor with that one. Im rather curious as to how Google knows how many cubic light years there are.
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#7
W1zzard
added some steps what i did, anyone see any mistakes?
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#8
W1zzard
by: Munki
Wow you managed to give me a brain tumor with that one. Im rather curious as to how Google knows how many cubic light years there are.
a cubic light year is a cube of space 1 light year on each side. google does not know how big the universe is, unless google is god, see here for more discussion: http://www.thechurchofgoogle.org/
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#9
Munki
by: W1zzard
a cubic light year is a cube of space 1 light year on each side. google does not know how big the universe is, unless google is god, see here for more discussion: http://www.thechurchofgoogle.org/
We may all joke about this now, in ten years google will be running everything.

FYI - That site is rather creepy. Computer geeks Scientology.
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#10
dir_d
weird they say 1st but month ago i got quoted 2TB Hitachi drives with SAS interface from Netapp for our SAN at work.
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#11
Munki
by: dir_d
weird they say 1st but month ago i got quoted 2TB Hitachi drives with SAS interface from Netapp for our SAN at work.
My current assumption is the drives that you were quoted were not the same interface (SATA, SCSI, Ect) as these nor the same speed.
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#12
Polaris573
Senior Moderator
by: W1zzard
added some steps what i did, anyone see any mistakes?
I didn't check the numbers but the math looks sound. I was going to do it myself until I saw you beat me to it. :laugh:

I'd like to see a review of this drive vs. 2 TB SATA.
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#13
Clement
by: W1zzard
wait till they say you can store 328946328946328476 PB in a cubic light year of these hdds.

math anyone? how many 3.5" hdds in a cubic light year?
I'm still waiting for light based computers and storage instead of just electricity. "Lightronics" :rockout:

I'm still not fond of these mechanical storage units. Even SSD isn't up to my...preferences.

What ever happened to the crystal, light based cube 'hard drive'?

I'm more interested in computation using light rather than biological or electrical methods. Not sure why as biological methods are rather disturbing with how they seem to just 'know' the answer to a computation, rather than actually computing it. :eek:

Maybe a mix of electronics and light? :pimp:

3 iterations per clock cycle...pffft...:shadedshu
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#14
Jonathand
Seagate Constellation 2TB 6Gb/s THUMBS UP!!

I installed these drives in a dell system for my client and there was increase in performance, i'd say over 40%. I'd recommend these drives anytime. We installed 3 of these Seagate Constellation 2TB in a raid system. Best of all, price is not that bad in comparison to the 3g drives.
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#15
yogurt_21
by: Polaris573
I didn't check the numbers but the math looks sound. I was going to do it myself until I saw you beat me to it. :laugh:

I'd like to see a review of this drive vs. 2 TB SATA.
probabally very close to exactly the same, this mostly gives you access to big drives on much better raid controllers,which of course could give better performance that way, but I highly doubt the interface will net any bonuses
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