Monday, March 22nd 2010

Intel Readying Core i7 875K and Core i5 655K Overclocker-Friendly LGA1156 Processors

Intel carved out high-end socket LGA1156 processors such as the Core i7 800 series, just so people opting for the LGA1156 also have the headroom to upgrade to high-end parts without having to switch to the more powerful LGA1366 platform with its Core i7 900 series processors. There are four parts in the performance-enthusiast (>$250) segment: Core i5 670 dual-core, Core i7 860 and Core i7 870 quad-core. With the possible advent of more powerful socket AM3 processors from AMD, notably the Phenom II X6 series with its overclocker-friendly Black Edition parts, Intel seems to be finding a need to expand its LGA1156 series a little.

In the works are the Core i7 875K quad-core, and Core i5 655K dual-core. Being careful as to not label them "Extreme Edition" chips (since the "Extreme Edition" moniker seems to be clearly demarcated for the LGA1366 platform and the market segment by that name), Intel gave these chips the "K" brand identifier. Last summer, Intel released the Pentium Dual-Core E6500K to select markets. Similar to that, the Core i7 875K and Core i5 655K are overclocker-friendly chips that come with unlocked BClk multipliers (much like the Extreme Edition chips).

The i7 875K is based on the Lynnfield core, operates at around 3 GHz (could be 2.93 GHz), has four cores, eight logical CPUs with HyperThreading enabled, 256 KB of L2 cache per core with 8 MB shared L3 cache, on-die dual-channel DDR3 memory controller and PCI-Express 2.0 root complex, and the unlocked BClk multiplier. The i5 655K is a dual-core part based on the Clarkdale core, operates at 3.20 GHz, has four logical CPUs with HyperThreading enabled, 256 KB L2 cache per core with shared 4 MB L3 cache, and on-chip northbridge. The i7 875K has a TDP of 95W, while the i5 655K has a TDP of 73W. Intel plans to release these chips around the time of Computex 2010 targeting summer sales. It remains to be seen which markets Intel targets with these new chips, whether it will be a worldwide product launch at all.Sources: XFastest, TechConnect Magazine, Tweaktown
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17 Comments on Intel Readying Core i7 875K and Core i5 655K Overclocker-Friendly LGA1156 Processors

#1
DanishDevil
Wow, this is surprising. I thought they were releasing the E6500Ks to get rid of stock before the move to the Core i platforms, but it looks like either that wasn't the reason, or they sold too well for it to make sense to not do it again.
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#3
Binge
Overclocking Surrealism
by: Initialised
Where's the i5 775K?
That wouldn't make as much sense as what they're doing now.
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#5
Yukikaze
Judging from the pricing for the i7 870, the i7 875K is going to be expensive. Not 980X expensive, but expensive nonetheless.

The i5 655K will be a lot cheaper, but it will still be probably priced around 200$ mark, I think.
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#6
Kenshai
If these chips are priced somewhat reasonable they will sell well.
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#7
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
What ar we looking at price wise?

655K $300+?
875K $600+?

I'd prefer they breath some life into 1156 by releasing some 32nm quads at the same price points with higher clock speeds to replace the 45nm ones.
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#8
DanishDevil
I agree. If you want 32nm, as of right now, you've got to deal with 2 physical cores with hyperthreading. It's perfect (and maybe more than enough) for me, but not for some of those power users or crunchers out there who want a summer cruncher that won't make the A/C bills even worse.
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#9
Fishymachine
never really liked 1156(except for the 750),so no thanks
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#10
Zubasa
OMG, BE from Intel finially?
Hell yes!
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#11
DanishDevil
Won't be that cheap, though. But the i5 655k will be 32nm, which will probably clock like a freaking madman.
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#12
[crs]
finally an upgrade from the i7 860 ^^ sweet
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#13
Kenshai
by: [crs]
finally an upgrade from the i7 860 ^^ sweet
It probably won't be worth to upgrade from that chip. As odds are it'll clock nearly as well.
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#14
OnBoard
Isn't all i5/i7 1156 overclocker friendly :D Seriously this was even simpler to OC than C2D and that was already very friendly.

I'd get these if the multi was in the 15 region for non K and you could hit 25 with these. Well these will be 10s overclockers, instead of the 1min it takes to OC i5-750.
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#15
[I.R.A]_FBi
by: Kenshai
It probably won't be worth to upgrade from that chip. As odds are it'll clock nearly as well.
flexiable multi options
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#16
DirectorC
If I stay Intel, there is an i7 875K in my future.
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#17
a_ump
dam, i wanna see how well that 655k overclocks :D
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