Wednesday, March 24th 2010

WD Introduces 2.5-inch SATA for 24x7 Operation

As demand has increased for digital video storage, including high-definition (HD) video, and as the variety of video-systems configurations increases, WD today expanded its line of hard drives for AV/DVR and surveillance applications to include small form factor, 2.5-inch SATA hard drives. WD AV-25 hard drives provide high reliability with a Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF) of 1 million hours and are engineered specifically for demanding, always-on multimedia streaming applications, while running at cool and quiet temperatures.

In addition to high reliability, WD AV-25 hard drives meet the demanding requirements of the AV/DVR and surveillance markets by offering customers universal compatibility, low power consumption and the ability to simultaneously record multiple audio and/or high-definition video streams. The new WD AV-25 hard drive is ideal for applications such as DVRs (digital video recorders), digital video surveillance and other small form factor environments where power consumption and 24x7 reliability are critical.

"Customers that market audio and video recording applications, such as DVRs, media centers and mainstream surveillance systems, often require 24x7 operation from hard drives," said Jim Welsh, senior vice president and general manager of WD's branded products and consumer electronics groups. "WD AV-25 hard drives are designed to withstand these demanding environments and offer consumers a small form factor solution that consumes less power, generates less heat, and operates quietly and, most importantly, reliably."

Features of the WD AV-25 hard drive include:
  • 24x7 reliability - Designed to last in always-on streaming digital audio/video environments such as DVR/PVR, digital video surveillance and other demanding multimedia applications.
  • Advanced Format technology - Leading edge technology that delivers improved video quality and AV performance through enhanced error correction capability.
  • SilkStream technology - Optimized for smooth, continuous digital video playback of up to five simultaneous HD streams. SilkStream is compatible with the ATA streaming command set so AV customers can use standard streaming management and error recovery options.
  • Ultra-cool operation - A cool drive is a more reliable drive. WD continues to develop new and innovative ways to keep drives cool while they are operating.
  • Quiet - Noise levels have been minimized to less than one sone1 - virtually below the threshold of human hearing.
  • Low power consumption - The drive draws less than 2 Watts while operating and a mere 4.75 Watts during spin up.
  • 1 million hours MTTF (MTBF) - Best-in-class reliability for small form factor AV storage.
  • Preemptive Wear Leveling (PWL) - The drive arm frequently sweeps across the disk to reduce uneven wear on the drive surface common to audio video streaming applications.
Price and AvailabilityThe WD AV-25 hard drive is offered in capacities of 160 GB, 250 GB, 320 GB and 500 GB and has a 3-year limited warranty. The WD AV-25 160 GB, 250 GB and 320 GB hard drives are available now from select e-tailers and distributors. The WD AV-25 500 GB hard drive will be available next month. MSRP for the WD AV-25 hard drives range from $50.00 USD to $80.00 USD depending on capacity. More information about WD AV-25 drives may be found here.
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15 Comments on WD Introduces 2.5-inch SATA for 24x7 Operation

#1
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
I haven't had problems with their(or other manufacturer) standard 2.5" drives running 24/7.
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#2
pjladyfox
I was getting excited about this until I noted on the Specifications page it's listed as a 5,400 RPM drive rather than 7,200. Bastards. :mad: :cry:
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#3
Sasqui
by: pjladyfox
I was getting excited about this until I noted on the Specifications page it's listed as a 5,400 RPM drive rather than 7,200. Bastards. :mad: :cry:
Yea, that'll make a difference when writing/reading large chunks of data, but not by a huge amount. I just got a secondary WD 500GB 5200 RPM drive for my laptop. The performance is supposed to be on par with some 7200 RPM drives.

One nice thing about this is the power consumption. USB 2.0 spec is 5watts max, so one plug should do it.

Anyone know what the wattage spec is for USB 3.0???
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#4
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
Considering what these are supposed to be used for, a 5400RPM drive is more than enough.
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#5
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
I have to say I run my pc 24/7 excluding a quick restart every 6 hours.
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#6
TheGuruStud
24x7 thing is marketing and if you ask me, drives are far more reliable running 24x7.
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#7
Static~Charge
by: Sasqui
One nice thing about this is the power consumption. USB 2.0 spec is 5watts max, so one plug should do it.

Anyone know what the wattage spec is for USB 3.0???
From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Serial_Bus

Power

A unit load is defined as 100 mA in USB 2.0, and was raised to 150 mA in USB 3.0. A maximum of 5 unit loads (500 mA) can be drawn from a port in USB 2.0, which was raised to 6 (900 mA) in USB 3.0. There are two types of devices: low-power and high-power. Low-power devices draw at most 1 unit load, with minimum operating voltage of 4.4 V in USB 2.0, and 4 V in USB 3.0. High-power devices draw the maximum number of unit loads supported by the standard. All devices default as low-power but the device's software may request high-power as long as the power is available on the providing bus.

In Battery Charging Specification, new powering modes are added to the USB specification. A host or hub Charging Downstream Port can supply a maximum of 1.5 A when communicating at low-bandwidth or full-bandwidth, a maximum of 900 mA when communicating at high-bandwidth, and as much current as the connector will safely handle when no communication is taking place; USB 2.0 standard-A connectors are rated at 1500 mA by default. A Dedicated Charging Port can supply a maximum of 1.8 A of current at 5.25 V. A portable device can draw up to 1.8 A from a Dedicated Charging Port.
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#8
Sasqui
by: Static~Charge
From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Serial_Bus

Power

A unit load is defined as 100 mA in USB 2.0, and was raised to 150 mA in USB 3.0. A maximum of 5 unit loads (500 mA) can be drawn from a port in USB 2.0, which was raised to 6 (900 mA) in USB 3.0. There are two types of devices: low-power and high-power. Low-power devices draw at most 1 unit load, with minimum operating voltage of 4.4 V in USB 2.0, and 4 V in USB 3.0. High-power devices draw the maximum number of unit loads supported by the standard. All devices default as low-power but the device's software may request high-power as long as the power is available on the providing bus.

In Battery Charging Specification, new powering modes are added to the USB specification. A host or hub Charging Downstream Port can supply a maximum of 1.5 A when communicating at low-bandwidth or full-bandwidth, a maximum of 900 mA when communicating at high-bandwidth, and as much current as the connector will safely handle when no communication is taking place; USB 2.0 standard-A connectors are rated at 1500 mA by default. A Dedicated Charging Port can supply a maximum of 1.8 A of current at 5.25 V. A portable device can draw up to 1.8 A from a Dedicated Charging Port.
I know this is OT, but...

I read that and said WTF :confused: I see 1.5 A and 1500mA in the same sentence (they mean the same thing, 1.5A.). Then I see 1.8 A.

So there's no simple answer? Is it 1.8Ax5.25V is the max wattage? I clearly recall seeing that 5W was the spec limit for a standard USB 2.0, so at 5V, that would be 1A.

Wiki is only as good as the person writing it. Anyway, thanks.
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#9
Baum
i have got more than two WD Green 1,5TB EADS running 24/7 and no problems, appart from their sh*ty "Intelli seek" which is more dumb than anything it damages the drive by parking all the time, just google for wdidle3.exe and what it does ...:slap: there are people with linux on their system!

appart from the capacity they look good, anything under 1TB is a nono for me as i have "old" 320's somewhere

RPM is a no brainer when you look what they are used for....

@Sasqui
first of all you have to divide the info's into "port max powerdraw", "Cable designed for" and things like that there's definately no absolute right answer as the standard is a bit watered but what i heard is that it is around 150-200 mA-> 0,2 A for low power and around 1A for one "powered" port.
As an example my usb hub has a 5V 2A powersupply which idles around 5,01V and goes down to 4V if under heavy load and all USb ports are connected on the hub in parallel without any "load" balancing chipset
thus connecting my usb cable mouse and 2,5"" HD results in a dimm mouse if the HDD spins up during access no matter how savvy the drive is spin up is to look for!
Posted on Reply
#10
hat
Enthusiast
by: TheGuruStud
24x7 thing is marketing and if you ask me, drives are far more reliable running 24x7.
Yeah, I thought hard drives were better off running 24-7. Marketing is everywhere...
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#11
Fourstaff
I think they are advertising their MTBF rating rather than the actual usage of their HDDs.
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#12
TheGuruStud
by: Fourstaff
I think they are advertising their MTBF rating rather than the actual usage of their HDDs.
But aren't all WD drives rated at 1 million mtbf, now?
They're not exaggerating, which I give them credit for, but it seems as if they're saying this some sort of new reliability level (which has been around for years)
Posted on Reply
#13
Mussels
Moderprator
by: Sasqui
Yea, that'll make a difference when writing/reading large chunks of data, but not by a huge amount. I just got a secondary WD 500GB 5200 RPM drive for my laptop. The performance is supposed to be on par with some 7200 RPM drives.

One nice thing about this is the power consumption. USB 2.0 spec is 5watts max, so one plug should do it.

Anyone know what the wattage spec is for USB 3.0???
USB 2.0 is 5V / 500ma. thats 2.5W, not 5W.

USB 3.0 is 950ma up from 500ma, so its almost 5W.
Yeah. massive.
Posted on Reply
#14
Completely Bonkers
One day, we will get USB CD drives and USB HDD drives that WILL work on one USB plug. We have been waiting... a small inbuilt recharging battery would help! It is the spin-up of the HDD or CD that is what usually causes the failure. Why-o-why hasnt someone fixed this yet?

PS. I found USB 1.1 ports to be much better at getting a CD drive or HDD going than USB 2.0.
Posted on Reply
#15
Mussels
Moderprator
by: Completely Bonkers
One day, we will get USB CD drives and USB HDD drives that WILL work on one USB plug. We have been waiting... a small inbuilt recharging battery would help! It is the spin-up of the HDD or CD that is what usually causes the failure. Why-o-why hasnt someone fixed this yet?

PS. I found USB 1.1 ports to be much better at getting a CD drive or HDD going than USB 2.0.
CD lasers use too much power. 3.5" HDD's need 5V and 12V to run.


single platter 2.5" drives work on one USB port, many others do too but its hit and miss.

Most SSD's run on one, expect your improvements there.
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