Wednesday, April 21st 2010

Intel Sandy Bridge to Introduce New Sockets, Chipsets, Reorganize Platform Further

Intel plans a pair of new sockets for launch with its new processor architecture that succeeds Westmere, codenamed "Sandy Bridge", which are due for 2011. As part of its "tick-tock" product launch strategy, the company is currently transitioning between the 45 nm "tock" (Nehalem architecture), and 32 nm "tick" (Westmere architecture). In 2011, it will transition from the 32 nm "tick" (Westmere architecture), to the 32 nm "tock" (Sandy Bridge architecture). The company uses a "tick-tock" model of process development, where each processor architecture gets to be made in two successive manufacturing processes, while each process gets to build two succeeding architectures. It seems to have become clear that with Sandy Bridge, Intel will also switch to new socket designs, making existing motherboards obsolete then. Architecturally, Sandy Bridge will introduce new feature-sets that make the CPU more powerful, clock-to-clock, such as AVX - Advanced Vector Extensions, an evolution of the SSE instruction set, native AES engine which has been introduced with Westmere, and so on.

The present LGA-1156 package on which Intel builds value-through-performance processors including a bulk of mainstream processors, will be succeeded with the LGA-1155 package. Though similar, LGA-1155 and LGA-1156 are not inter-compatible, meaning that LGA-1155 processors will not work on existing LGA-1156 motherboards, and LGA-1156 processors will not work on LGA-1155 motherboards, either. For these processors, the arrangement of vital components is similar to the LGA-1156 package, except that every LGA-1155 processor - dual-core or quad-core - will feature an on-die display controller.

The die itself will be monolithic, where the northbridge component completely integrates with the processor component, leaving only the southbridge outside the package, on the motherboard. Currently, the "Clarkdale" and "Arrandale" dual-core processors have the processor and northbridge components on separate dies, but on the same package. LGA-1155 is also designated as socket H2 (LGA-1156 is H1), the package is identical in size to LGA-1156, but has a different pin layout and orientation notch.

Chipsets that drive the LGA-1156 platform include P67, H67, H61, and Q67, which will support features which were conceived prior to Ibex Peak platform's launch, but were shelved, such as ONFI NAND Flash "Braidwood", etc. USB 3.0 still isn't part of the feature-set, though native SATA 6 Gb/s support is on the cards.

The next big platform to succeed the LGA-1366, which caters to processors in the upper performance-though-enthusiast segments is the "Patsburg" platform, succeeding the existing "Tylersburg" based Intel X58, 5000 series chipsets. Here, Intel will introduce a massive new socket, the LGA-2011. The pin count is drastically increased for two reasons: the processor will have a 256-bit wide memory interface (quad-channel DDR3), and the northbridge component (currently X58 PCH) will be integrated completely into the processor package, upping the pin count with the PCI-Express and DMI pins. The on-die PCI-Express 2.0 root-complex will give out 32 lanes for graphics (unlike 16 lanes on the LGA-1155), and a DMI link to the so-called "Intel X68" chipset, which is relegated to being a Platform Controller Hub, just like the P55, or P67. The X68 could have a feature-set similar to the P67.Source: bit-tech.net
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119 Comments on Intel Sandy Bridge to Introduce New Sockets, Chipsets, Reorganize Platform Further

#1
DOM
im sad but this is going to stop me from spending for a while lol
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#2
Scrizz
sweet

s775 --> s2011 4 me :D
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#3
qwerty_lesh
1366 -> 2011 for me ! ^_^

3 years is great, sucks for those who jumped on the Tylersburg/Bloomfield wagon much much later, tho they shouldnt complain, they didn't pay through the nose like us early adopters did!!

the good news is, I will not be going gulftown from my 920 haha, i mean, whats the point, if you know its going to be super seeded in a year you'd be crazy to spend such money on a cpu and find out its not future proof.

I am surprised that the x68 & cpus will have DMI, the x58 (AFAIK) are all QPI, so... Intels dropping quick-path interconnect as the exclusive for their top performance platforms :confused:
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#4
TIGR
The more frequently Intel releases new [incompatible] sockets/platforms, the more AMD systems I will be building for my customers, and for myself. A good upgrade path can be a strong selling point for informed builders/buyers.
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#5
MN12BIRD
2 new sockets?

Fuck this, I'm outta here.
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#6
a_ump
yea it does seem really soon. i mean how long did LGA775 last? like 5yrs? 2004 is earliest i remember it, could be wrong and intel has still released CPU's for it recently. So seeing it live this long, people get used to that n then expect the next socket to do the same. Which imo they will, i think this is just an informing of what's to come. These socket changes won't happen Q1 2011 or anything.
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#7
Scrizz
it's the same thing with windows..
Xp lasted too long and people had forgotten hoe regularly OSs changed..
same story different product.
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#8
[I.R.A]_FBi
i <3 my Q6600 :)

LGA2011, my savings starts with my first paycheck
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#9
AsphyxiA
my girlfriend just happened to be listening to "Tik Tok" by Kesha when I read this :laugh:
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#10
DarthCyclonis
Intel is getting carried away. But can you blame them? They are in business to make money.

However the I7 1366 platform is more than sufficent the next couple of years. When Windows OS, games and programs I use start utilizing multi-cores and multi threads a little more efficiently there is really no need for an upgrade.

Just a waste of money at this point.
Posted on Reply
#11
pr0n Inspector
by: DarthCyclonis
Intel is getting carried away. But can you blame them? They are in business to make money.

However the I7 1366 platform is more than sufficent the next couple of years. When Windows OS, games and programs I use start utilizing multi-cores and multi threads a little more efficiently there is really no need for an upgrade.

Just a waste of money at this point.
This is only a waste of money if the user is suffering from Upgrading OCD.
Posted on Reply
#12
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
by: pr0n Inspector
This is only a waste of money if the user is suffering from Upgrading OCD.
Well imagine all the people on P4's who might want to upgrade. The way I see it is if you didn't get core i7 you should get Sandy Bridge and if you got core i7 it would be sensible to get the next iteration. Not sure if that makes sense.
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#13
TIGR
by: DrPepper
Well imagine all the people on P4's who might want to upgrade. The way I see it is if you didn't get core i7 you should get Sandy Bridge and if you got core i7 it would be sensible to get the next iteration. Not sure if that makes sense.
Makes perfect sense.

Just would be nice if Sandy Bridge chips were on a compatible platform, considering the more simple offerings of Intel's competitor.
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#14
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: eidairaman1
Intel=Nvidia 2 companies that force you to upgrade and cant stand any form of competition
I don't see how nVidia forces anyone to upgrade. Can you elaborate on that some more please?
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#15
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
by: TIGR
Makes perfect sense.

Just would be nice if Sandy Bridge chips were on a compatible platform, considering the more simple offerings of Intel's competitor.
I think if intel could, they would but the had to reorganise the whole socket in order for sandy bridge to work.
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#16
a_ump
by: [I.R.A]_FBi
i <3 my Q6600 :)

LGA2011, my savings starts with my first paycheck
here here :toast:. i too love my q6600. at 3.4ghz, it still runs games fine for me. I'll upgrade my graphic card before my CPU.

It's ridiculous how long multi-core chips have been out; dual, tri, quad, now hexa, and applications still aren't optimized for multi-core/threads. programmers need to step up and at least optimize CPU usage. Look at Valve, they did a great job on multi-core rendering with TF2 and L4D.
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#17
theubersmurf
by: Phxprovost
:wtf: why is it that Intel seems to come out with more sockets then cpu's these days?
Because they hate you and love your money? I'm not sure.
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#18
jmcslob
I gave up Intel with the 775 switch to 1366...

Amd has made some switchs in that time too..But they have mostly been compatible..
So when Bulldozer comes out I'll switch to that..and never go Intel again..
To many sockets in so little time...It is BS..Some are willing to accept it I'm not
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#19
LAN_deRf_HA
Apparently the 1155 dual cores will have a tdp of 35w, and no processor will have a tdp over 45 (probably quads). So I'm guessing 6+ core procs won't be available for it.
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#20
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
That's what Intel gets for moving the North Bridge to the CPU--constant socket upgrades.
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#22
TIGR
Is there no way for Intel to create a modular platform that can provide buses, links, sockets, etc. that can span many generations? And what do they gain by releasing two sockets at a time, and so close to the last two? Product line/platform differentiation? Is it that valuable?
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#23
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
The main reasons are voltage, DIMM slots, and south bridge. Putting a processor in a motherboard that don't have the correct pinage for those things, something is going to get damaged. They change the sockets to make sure those mistakes don't have a chance of happening.

LGA-2011 = quad-channel, two-way
LGA-1366 = tri-channel, two-way
LGA-1156 = dual-channel, one-way

I'm not sure why they are changing 1156 to 1155 though, it could be voltages.
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#24
Wile E
Power User
by: dr emulator (madmax)
it shouldn't as you've got a thousand bucks processor which should (if ya don't kill it :laugh:) last for years

i'm still going to get an i7 processor and mobo sometime this year why ?
well i haven't upgraded in about 7 years :eek::wtf::shadedshu so hopefully the new i7
will last just as long as my current system has, which by then there might be a 24 core processor out
that will :nutkick: my eyes brain and wallet:laugh::D
That's a big, BIG if. lol
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#25
erocker
If we can get more USB 3.0 and Sata III with more PCI-E bandwith, it's a win. It's unfortunate that they can't do this with a compatible socket.
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