Friday, June 25th 2010

Sharkoon Introduces 3.5-inch SATA Enclosure with USB 3.0 Interface

Sharkoon presents another external housing with a faster USB3.0 port: After the accessory specialist had introduced their QuickStore Portable USB3.0 for 2.5-inch SATA hard drives in May, Sharkoon has now expanded their "Rapid Case" series with a SuperSpeed model for SATA hard drives with a 3.5-inch form factor.

The "Rapid Case" series offers solid Aluminum for users who are searching for an inexpensive yet quality made external hard drive case for an enclosure. Current models will be available with external USB2.0 ports for 2.5 and 3.5-inch IDE hard drives as well as either with USB2.0 or USB2.0 plus eSATA hard drives in both sizes.

The latest Sharkoon Rapid Case 3.5" SATA USB3.0 model is a downward compatible SuperSpeed interface complete with a sleek black design, a blue illuminating power switch, handy dimensions of 205 x 115 x 35 mm (L x W x H), an empty weight of 460 grams, and supports Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows 7 (32 and 64 Bit). With the included stand, the housing can also be operated in an upright position. In addition, a USB3.0 cable (plug A / plug B), AC adapter, screwdriver, screws, non-slip rubber knobs for the housing bottom, and a brief instruction manual are all included within shipping.

End customers will find the Sharkoon Rapid-Case 3.5" SATA USB3.0 available immediately for the retail price of 29.90 euros in authorized retailers. The Sharkoon Rapid-Case 3.5" SATA USB3.0 / is priced at MSRP 29.90 euros.
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18 Comments on Sharkoon Introduces 3.5-inch SATA Enclosure with USB 3.0 Interface

#1

About time we started seeing some 3.0 enclosures, but why does it need to have power adapter and it's only using 3.0, i though 3.0 send enough power, and i would like to see 3.0 and eSATA combo cause eSATA is still the fastest.
Posted on Edit | Reply
#2
Cheeseball
It's a 3.5" (desktop/server) HDD, so it uses slightly more power. Most 3.5" enclosures use a seperate power source.

You might be thinking of 2.5" laptop HDDs, which require one or two USB connections.
Posted on Reply
#3
Sasqui
by: Taskforce
About time we started seeing some 3.0 enclosures, but why does it need to have power adapter and it's only using 3.0, i though 3.0 send enough power, and i would like to see 3.0 and eSATA combo cause eSATA is still the fastest.
by: Cheeseball
It's a 3.5" (desktop/server) HDD, so it uses slightly more power. Most 3.5" enclosures use a seperate power source.

You might be thinking of 2.5" laptop HDDs, which require one or two USB connections.
That just got me asking the question if USB 3.0 has a higher power supply limit than USB 2.0. USB 2.0 typically peaks out at 5watts.
Posted on Reply
#4

by: Cheeseball
It's a 3.5" (desktop/server) HDD, so it uses slightly more power. Most 3.5" enclosures use a seperate power source.

You might be thinking of 2.5" laptop HDDs, which require one or two USB connections.
It's rumored USB 3.0 can send much more power than 2.0 eliminating the need to have external power source on many devices including 3.5" external hard drives.

"So i heard"
Posted on Edit | Reply
#5
1freedude
Does it have SATA III, though? It should for true future-proofing.

As far as the adapter (wallwart or brick), it is necessary, as USB does not provide the 12v (typically yellow wire) that 3.5's need.
Posted on Reply
#6
p_o_s_pc
F@H&WCG addict
by: Taskforce
About time we started seeing some 3.0 enclosures, but why does it need to have power adapter and it's only using 3.0, i though 3.0 send enough power, and i would like to see 3.0 and eSATA combo cause eSATA is still the fastest.
I'm sure it can send the WATTS needed but 3.5" drives run on 12v and USB 3.0 puts out 5v. that is why laptop drives can run on USB only and why 3.5" drives need a power brick.
Posted on Reply
#7
pr0n Inspector
USB 2.0: 500mA, 5V, 2.5 watts
USB 3.0: 900mA, 5V, 4.5 watts

Also, 3.5'' HDD motors have very high start-up current requirements, they draw around ONE amp from the 5V line and around TWO amps from the 12V line for 3-6 seconds.
Posted on Reply
#8
Mussels
Moderprator
USB will never power 3.5" hard drives, because they run on 12V, and USB gives out 5V

also, HDD's dont use much power to start up. they use about 15-18W to power on, the idle in the 8-12W range depending on the model. I've got a wall meter and tested many of them in an external enclosure.
Posted on Reply
#9
Baum
the lower the watt's go, lower the accurency for wall meter is :roll:
and "some" to all hard drive use to power peak when they spin up, thats why most PSU don't like massive HDD arrays :-), i don't know why exactly but translatory inertia eats power .
( oh god i loved my 4x320GB IDE back the day, 350W PSU :laugh: )
best low power 3,5 HDs ive seen are the WD Green EADS line, taking 3-4W under idle/free spin, spindown is 1.2W and load only bumps to 5,6W


but hey time to upgrade my IDE!! IDE Usb 2.0 external Drive to USB 3.0 :D
Posted on Reply
#10
Mussels
Moderprator
by: Baum
the lower the watt's go, lower the accurency for wall meter is :roll:

best low power 3,5 HDs ive seen are the WD Green EADS line, taking 3-4W under idle/free spin, spindown is 1.2W and load only bumps to 5,6W


but hey time to upgrade my IDE!! IDE Usb 2.0 external Drive to USB 3.0 :D
mines accurate. its not some cheap crappy unit. i also have a cage with 5 HDD's in it, and powering it up and dividing by 5 gives me pretty much the same numbers.

WD greens may be low power, but they're as slow as a 2.5" drive.
Posted on Reply
#11
Smith_X
It is possible to have an enclosure with both e-SATA III and usb3.0 together? I never see any enclosure support both interface.
Posted on Reply
#12
Mussels
Moderprator
by: Smith_X
It is possible to have an enclosure with both e-SATA III and usb3.0 together? I never see any enclosure support both interface.
possible yes, but more expensive. USB 3.0 is easier to sell than a combo enclosure for $20 more.
Posted on Reply
#13
pr0n Inspector
by: Mussels
USB will never power 3.5" hard drives, because they run on 12V, and USB gives out 5V

also, HDD's dont use much power to start up. they use about 15-18W to power on, the idle in the 8-12W range depending on the model. I've got a wall meter and tested many of them in an external enclosure.
It's completely possible to boost 5V to 12V as long as you can provide enough current. How do you think single AA white LED flashlights work?

Wall meters are useless in this case because they update too slowly as shown here.
Posted on Reply
#14
Mussels
Moderprator
by: pr0n Inspector
It's completely possible to boost 5V to 12V as long as you can provide enough current. How do you think single AA white LED flashlights work?

Wall meters are useless in this case because they update too slowly as shown here.
boost? yes. in an expensive, heat producing way that no one will bother with.

interesting read on the hard drives power usage, but its not like i'm measuring at the back of the drive. i'm getting average results - and average power draw is what matters most.
Posted on Reply
#15
pr0n Inspector
by: Mussels
boost? yes. in an expensive, heat producing way that no one will bother with.

interesting read on the hard drives power usage, but its not like i'm measuring at the back of the drive. i'm getting average results - and average power draw is what matters most.
No. the peak current draw of a starting motor is the minimum requirement. the power source must be able to cope with that sudden high current draw.
Posted on Reply
#16
Mussels
Moderprator
by: pr0n Inspector
No. the peak current draw of a starting motor is the minimum requirement. the power source must be able to cope with that sudden high current draw.
for all of what, a tenth of a second? nothings going to pop from that quick a power draw.
Posted on Reply
#17
pr0n Inspector
by: Mussels
for all of what, a tenth of a second? nothings going to pop for that quick a load draw.
more like half to one second. You can look at wallwarts of external enclosures, they are design to handle that peak current draw, unlike the puny USB.
Posted on Reply
#18
Mad_Commander
Has anyone ever tried this product? I'm looking for a 3.5 "enclosure for my unused hard disk. I once read a review on this product here.. The result is pretty good.. But before deciding to buy it, I want opinions from people who've tried it directly..

Thanks.. :)
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