Monday, July 26th 2010

Active Media Products Launches IDE Flash Disk Module (DOM) Line

Active Media Products, a leading manufacturer of DOMs, SSDs and USB drives, today announced a new line of IDE Flash DOM (Disk on Module) drives that are smaller, lighter, faster and more reliable than rotating media, making them ideal for use in servers, networking, industrial, military and embedded applications. These new Parallel ATA flash disk modules are offered in 8GB, 16GB and 32GB capacities, built with highly reliable MLC NAND Flash.

"We developed these PATA DOMs in response to demand from our industrial customers who need relatively small but highly reliable storage drives for use in server appliances," explained Active Media Products VP of Sales, Jerry Thomson. These DOMs have been validated on the latest Opteron 6100 (Magny Cours) server motherboards to ensure compatibility with the newest server hardware. Designed with industry standard 40-pin and 44-pin female IDE connectors, they are compatible with myriads of existing motherboards and systems.

These new FDMs are available now through Amazon, or to OEMs directly from AMP at approximate prices as follows: 8GB models $63, 16GB models $85, 32GB models $159. For more information, please visit this page.
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15 Comments on Active Media Products Launches IDE Flash Disk Module (DOM) Line

#1
HillBeast
So they are basically really small SSDs? Interesting.
Posted on Reply
#2
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
A bit pricey imo, but otherwise I kinda like it.

It's a bit of a shame it's for an older intercace though. Controllers for IDE/PATA are not that pricey though,.,,
Posted on Reply
#3
Phxprovost
Xtreme Refugee
so can i jam one of these in that useless ide slot on my mobo? :confused:
Posted on Reply
#4
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
Yes. DOMs are convenient if you want to make NAS servers using old PC parts.
Posted on Reply
#5
lism
by: HillBeast
So they are basically really small SSDs? Interesting.
Not really. Flash disks tend to last a lil longer without having issues like SSD's have.
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#6
sttubs
Could you use these in a regular desktop PC as a cheap alternative for the SSD's, it would just be for the OS.
Posted on Reply
#7
Sasqui
by: btarunr
Yes. DOMs are convenient if you want to make NAS servers using old PC parts.
I guess "Old PC Parts" are the operative words. Have to assume there really is a market for these.
Posted on Reply
#8
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: Sasqui
I guess "Old PC Parts" are the operative words. Have to assume there really is a market for these.
Every PC-based (those which are driven by x86 processors) NAS-maker uses DOMs. The DOM is bootable and houses the NAS' OS.
Posted on Reply
#9
Sasqui
by: btarunr
Every PC-based (those which are driven by x86 processors) NAS-maker uses DOMs. The DOM is bootable and houses the NAS' OS.
Commonly with an IDE interface?
Posted on Reply
#10
Poisonsnak
Huh finally I might be able to put an SSD in that old laptop of mine. Kind of slow though, 80MB read and 38MB write. I wonder what the 4k random performance is, hopefully it isn't like the JMF602
Posted on Reply
#11
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: Sasqui
Commonly with an IDE interface?
Yes, commonly IDE, though you also get SATA DOMs. NAS-makers use IDE DOMs to free up SATA ports to the actual hard drives the NAS is holding.
Posted on Reply
#12
Hayder_Master
looks it's nice idea, but for old server i see SCSI HDD's still can do the job
Posted on Reply
#13
zads
lol @ piss poor marketing picture, did they use MS Paint to generate it?
Almost certainly a rebadged product from 3rd party manufacturer

by: lism
Not really. Flash disks tend to last a lil longer without having issues like SSD's have.
Actually they use the same controller and firmware that a "full-size" SSD uses.
Posted on Reply
#14
Initialised
Would make a nice hibernation device for a quick boot.
Posted on Reply
#15
WarEagleAU
Bird of Prey
Never heard of these (read: DOM) before....interesting.
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