Monday, August 16th 2010

Thecus Releases C10GT 10 Gbps Ethernet PCI-E Adapter

As digital files grow larger in size, the amount of data being transferred over networks is ever increasing. Today, Thecus Technology is pleased to announce the C10GT 10 Gbps Ethernet PCI-e Adapter. Featuring lightning-fast transfer speeds, dual cable connectivity, and simple installation and setup, the C10GT is a high-speed 10Gb ready network card designed to help users affordably take full advantage of the new upcoming 10Gb Ethernet standard.

The C10GT is a very capable and feature-packed network adapter. Powered by the enterprise-class Tehuti Luxor TN3020-D processor, the C10GT delivers efficient high-bandwidth access to server and storage applications, while requiring relatively low power for operation. Another standout feature of the C10GT is its dual cable interface, which features one CX4 port and one SFP+ port – perfect for accommodating both copper and fiber optic cabling.

On the software side, the C10GT is an extremely flexible device which is easily integrated into almost any network environment. It is compliant with IEEE 802.3ae, IEEE 802.3ak, and IEEE 802.1q VLAN standards, and supports a multitude of widely-adopted operating systems, including Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008 / 2008 R2, Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Linux. The C10GT is also compatible with the Windows Management Interface (WMI), allowing administrators to easily manage both local and remote computers.

This full-height PCI-e adapter is easily installed in both PCI Express x4 and x8 slots, and can even be used to upgrade the following Thecus NAS devices to 10Gb Ethernet capability:
  • N7700PRO
  • N7700+
  • N8800PRO
  • N8800+
“Next-generation 10Gb Ethernet is going to be the new standard for enterprises of the future,” said Florence Shih, Thecus Technology General Manager. “With our new C10GT, businesses can fully leverage the speed and convenience of this advanced technology today.”

For more information on the C10GT, check out this page.
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12 Comments on Thecus Releases C10GT 10 Gbps Ethernet PCI-E Adapter

#1
link2009
Good idea but the only concern I have is that 10 Gb routers are not cheap :cry:
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#2
BazookaJoe
Well wont this just kick some WIKKD ass in the NAS arena?
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#3
Phxprovost
Xtreme Refugee
by: link2009
Good idea but the only concern I have is that 10 Gb routers are not cheap :cry:
yea cause 10 Gbps Nic's are just supper cheap these days :p
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#4
TheLaughingMan
Thecus sounds like the name of someone Kratos killed in GoW at some point in time when other real mythological figures didn't fit.
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#5
Yukikaze
I hope it offloads a helluva lot of things, or the CPU is going to DIE while processing traffic through this. Also, a 10GbE network is incredibly expensive at the moment, with chips for LOM (Lan-On-Motherboard) implementations costing several dozen dollars, server NICs in the hundreds of dollars, and routers, switches and so on also costing a bomb.
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#6
TheLaughingMan
by: Yukikaze
I hope it offloads a helluva lot of things, or the CPU is going to DIE while processing traffic through this. Also, a 10GbE network is incredibly expensive at the moment, with chips for LOM (Lan-On-Motherboard) implementations costing several dozen dollars, server NICs in the hundreds of dollars, and routers, switches and so on also costing a bomb.
Several dozen dollars?

This is not for private use. Most people running a private network that is wired will not need nor entertain needing this. It is hard enough saturating 1 Gb Ethernet lines through a network.

And processing traffic does not and never will need that much CPU power. This will do nothing to a current gen processor with more than 1 core. Now processing traffic while doing other stuff maybe an issue, but you really thing a non-commercial server can saturate a 10GbE line with enough data to even require a CPU's "real" attention.
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#7
MomentoMoir
Yes. If the NOC from Quakecon used this there would be enough file transfering going on to completely saturate it.
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#8
Jizzler
by: Phxprovost
yea cause 10 Gbps Nic's are just supper cheap these days :p
$599 is pretty good compared to what they were at in the beginning or even just a couple years ago :D

I could squeeze them into the budget where quad-port gigabit NICs are being used (I spent $400 each on a couple not too ago), but the switches are still pricey. Heck, I outfitted my last job with 4 x 48port switches for the same cost as some of the 8 - 12 port 10G models.
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#9
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
for server rooms, guys. not intended for home use. that is why it is expensive.
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#10
dir_d
Funny thing is at my work we were pricing new servers with a higher throughput backbone and theres not really a price difference between 10Gbps Ethernet for iSCSI compared to 8Gbps Fibre Channel. So why would people adopt the 10Gbps when they can get faster speeds with the 8Gbps fibre channel.

Before some people say 10GBps is faster its not because of overhead and latency Fibre channel has low overhead and 0 latency
Posted on Reply
#11
Yukikaze
by: TheLaughingMan
Several dozen dollars?

This is not for private use. Most people running a private network that is wired will not need nor entertain needing this. It is hard enough saturating 1 Gb Ethernet lines through a network.

And processing traffic does not and never will need that much CPU power. This will do nothing to a current gen processor with more than 1 core. Now processing traffic while doing other stuff maybe an issue, but you really thing a non-commercial server can saturate a 10GbE line with enough data to even require a CPU's "real" attention.
I am an industry insider for 10GbE enterprise networking devices, and I am quite aware that this isn't for a home network, as it is incredibly expensive and not required. As for cost: The cost of a dual port, external PHY, 10GbE LOM chip hovers somewhere between the 25$ and the 50$ mark.

A single UDP stream at 10Gb, running without offloading anything to the NIC is quite capable of overwhelming a dual core platform, and will put a dent in the resource pool of a powerful quad core system. If you have two or four 10GbE ports running at max capacity without offloading, then you can easily bring even a dual processor system to its knees.
Posted on Reply
#12
TheLaughingMan
by: Yukikaze
I am an industry insider for 10GbE enterprise networking devices, and I am quite aware that this isn't for a home network, as it is incredibly expensive and not required. As for cost: The cost of a dual port, external PHY, 10GbE LOM chip hovers somewhere between the 25$ and the 50$ mark.

A single UDP stream at 10Gb, running without offloading anything to the NIC is quite capable of overwhelming a dual core platform, and will put a dent in the resource pool of a powerful quad core system. If you have two or four 10GbE ports running at max capacity without offloading, then you can easily bring even a dual processor system to its knees.
Well, this device should offer better real world throughput than an external LOM and the option of the fiber.

As for the second statement, I refer to the industry insider part. As I simply pointing out as Easy did, this is not something you will have in your house. Small business, commercial server, etc. sure. As I believe, as you do as well, this will not be in a dual core UDP server, it will be in some 24+ core server array with plenty of CPU power available for it to eat up.

It seems we are arguing the same point here, so I digress.
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