Wednesday, September 8th 2010

Corsair Dominator GT (GTX6) Breaks Two DDR3 Memory Speed World Records

Corsair, a worldwide designer and supplier of high-performance components to the PC gaming hardware market, today announced that its Dominator GT GTX6 ultra-high performance DDR3 memory was used to set two new world records for dual-channel memory frequency at CAS 7 and CAS 8. The record-setting frequencies of 3078.2 MHz, CL8-11-8-31, 1T, and 3059.4 MHz, CL7-11-8-31, 1T, were achieved by renowned extreme overclocker “Mat”, aka Matthias Zronek, from Overclockers.at.

“I've worked with the Corsair Dominator GT memory for quite some time now, and can easily say that these are great memory modules, dedicated to world-record overclocking,” stated Matthias Zronek. “What surprised me the most is the potential of the Domintator GT GTX6. Even at 3000MHz and higher frequencies, at CL7, there is still headroom for lots of optimization.”

The hardware used included a Gigabyte P55A-UD7 motherboard, Intel Core i7-870 processor, and a pair of Corsair Dominator GT CMGTX6 modules. Corsair’s innovative modular DHX+ technology allowed a Besi Memory-Freezer to be directly attached to the memory heat sinks, enabling benchmarking temperatures as low as -90 degrees C using liquid nitrogen.

Independent validation of these world record achievements can be found at the CPU-Z validation database: 3078.2 MHz CL8, 3059.4 MHz CL7.

Full details about the world records, and how they were achieved, can be seen on the Xtremesystems forums, here.
Add your own comment

18 Comments on Corsair Dominator GT (GTX6) Breaks Two DDR3 Memory Speed World Records

#1
983264
Now that is a serious record... Nice...
Posted on Reply
#2
Nick89
Eh. I might start caring about memory speeds again once DDR5 comes out.
Posted on Reply
#3
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: Nick89
..once DDR5 comes out.
Good luck caring about computer hardware in general in 2018.
Posted on Reply
#4
The Witcher
by: btarunr
Good caring about computer hardware in general in 2018.
Why 2018 ?

Anything specially other than the 12-cores CPU and DDR5 ram :roll: ?
Posted on Reply
#5
Easo
Awesomesauce.
Posted on Reply
#6
CDdude55
Crazy 4 TPU!!!
Wow that's some awesome speed!!!.
Posted on Reply
#7
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: The Witcher
Why 2018 ?

Anything specially other than the 12-cores CPU and DDR5 ram :roll: ?
Because it will be 2018 by the time you'll have DDR5 as a PC memory standard. DDR3 is tight till at least 2012~13, DDR4 could stretch till 2018 at the rate at which the industry adopts new memory standards.
Posted on Reply
#8
DanishDevil
Fooooooley HHHHHHHHHuck! That's some fast RAM.
Posted on Reply
#9
cadaveca
My name is Dave
LoL 2 SuperPi being used for World Records. Let's see some 3D....:rolleyes:
Posted on Reply
#10
overclocking101
thats fast ass memory! but lets be honest it's more the cpu's IMC then the ram thats impressive. any hyper based ram can do speeds like that but not many IMC's are able to get much over 2400 that cpu was more then likely hand picked through many ES cpu's
Posted on Reply
#12
stavssen
by: btarunr
Because it will be 2018 by the time you'll have DDR5 as a PC memory standard. DDR3 is tight till at least 2012~13, DDR4 could stretch till 2018 at the rate at which the industry adopts new memory standards.
Have you seen DDR4 with video cards? They jumped over and came out with DDR5 right after DDR3. So 2 more years, smarty.:laugh:
Posted on Reply
#13
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: stavssen
Have you seen DDR4 with video cards? They jumped over and came out with DDR5 right after DDR3. So 2 more years, smarty.:laugh:
No, 'smarty', PC memory technologies have a leap-cycle of 4 years with two transition years. The next leap for DDR3 is not DDR4, but DDR3 high-speed (DDR3 1866 ~ 3200 MHz @ 1.3V), only after that there is DDR4.

DDR3 ≠ GDDR3, DDR5 ≠ GDDR5.
Posted on Reply
#14
CDdude55
Crazy 4 TPU!!!
by: stavssen
Have you seen DDR4 with video cards? They jumped over and came out with DDR5 right after DDR3. So 2 more years, smarty.:laugh:
Yes, there are GDDR4 video cards.
Posted on Reply
#15
caleb
What's the purpose of extreme cooling/overclocking something and then posting that it works for 5 minutes in a lab?
Posted on Reply
#16
CDdude55
Crazy 4 TPU!!!
by: caleb
What's the purpose of extreme cooling/overclocking something and then posting that it works for 5 minutes in a lab?
He broke the record, what's the point of keeping that speed longer then a couple minutes?. The goal was to reach the highest speed possible and he did it.
Posted on Reply
#17
[H]@RD5TUFF
It's pretty interesting that he used a special LN2 pot for the ram, where as the guys who had the previous record used insulators to make the space around the ram to McGyver'ed pot.

by: caleb
What's the purpose of extreme cooling/overclocking something and then posting that it works for 5 minutes in a lab?
It's neat either way, and while not practical, what company's can learn from the kinds of heat and voltages, that are involved with these speeds, and hopefully leading to faster ram speeds at lower voltages.
Posted on Reply
#18
Wrigleyvillain
PTFO or GTFO
by: caleb
What's the purpose of extreme cooling/overclocking something and then posting that it works for 5 minutes in a lab?
C'mon man. You could ask the same question about so many different things that so many different people spend lots of time, money and effort on.

What's the purpose of playing video games, for example?
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment