Tuesday, November 9th 2010

ATP Introduces Vertical Slim SATA SSD Module

ATP, a leading flash memory manufacturer known for its high quality, durable flash and DRAM memory modules announced its newly released Vertical Slim SATA Embedded Module. With its small size and ratified JEDEC standard, MO-297, the Vertical Slim SATA Embedded Module is an ideal fit for embedded solid state storage applications. The compact design of the Slim SATA solution makes the module the ideal structure for SSD solutions that have space constraints and require high performance and reliability.

The ATP Vertical Slim SATA Module adheres to the JEDEC standard, as well as CE, FCC and RoHS industry compliance and regulatory standards. The small size (54mm(L)x39.8mm(W)x4.0mm(H) and high density of the Vertical Slim SATA makes the module an ideal replacement for the 2.5” HDD. It offers an alternative solution for space constrained embedded applications such as IPC, Blades, Advanced TCA, Networking hosts, POS machines, and enhances the capability, performance and reliability of different applications. The ATP Vertical Slim SATA Module is available in 2GB to 16GB capacities.

"ATP Electronics is committed to addressing the market needs of smaller and more efficient memory modules which provide the same performance and reliability of larger alternatives. The Vertical Slim SATA Module, with its compact design and superior performance capability is the ultimate solution for embedded solid state storage applications requiring optimal operating abilities," said Michael Plaksin, ATP Vice President of Sales and Marketing.

ATP Vertical Slim SATA embedded modules support key flash management features including global wear-leveling, error checking and correction as well as drive monitoring (S.M.A.R.T.), providing our clients with the high reliability and endurance.
Add your own comment

9 Comments on ATP Introduces Vertical Slim SATA SSD Module

#1
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
what good would a 2Gb SSD be unless youre going to install Windows XP/98 or Linux on it?? - so its not really any good as an OS/boot drive

it would suck as a game drive as most installations are in excess of 4/6Gb so if you do find a game that would fit on a 2Gb thats it you cant put anything else on it. unless you play old games where they would take up anywhere between 200-700Mb

---

the only real use for it i see is something to dump your page file on - but even then a 2Gb is still pretty restrictive and you need something like 4-8Gb for pagefile.

So i have no idea
Posted on Reply
#2
v3dg
You obviously haven't made it to the end of the article...
...is available in 2GB to 16GB capacities.

Also, if anyone cares, the r/w on these things is 116/102.

If you are really limited in space though, 1.8" SSD's are barely bigger then this and can offer 3+ times the speed and much better size.
Posted on Reply
#3
slyfox2151
2 of these in Raid 0 for some World of Warcraft madness :D
Posted on Reply
#4
wickerman
sometimes capacity can take a backseat to performance or form factor, but that being said 2gb is plenty of storage for many embedded devices and 16gb is more space I would imagine devices utilizing these modules would require.

something like this is ideal for tight system integration, stuff like hardware firewalls, NAS devices, as well as the ones mentioned in the press document get to have fast and upgradable/replaceable storage. You don't have to deal with flash embedded on the motherboard going bad, or the use of USB/compact flash modules that are much slower and require various drivers and adapters.

I think it strikes a good balance between form factor and performance. Sure you could probably fit a 1.8" SSD but the cost will go up with the performance, and if you dont need the absolute peak of raw performance, then its a good trade off. And remember, while 2gb is tiny when you have windows 7 taking up 8gb...2gb is plenty when you are running an OS designed for embedded applications, such as windows CE/embedded, or stripped down linux-based operating systems like FreeNas or even LiveCD type clients...in all these cases your OS alone will take up no more than perhaps 500mb.
Posted on Reply
#5
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
by: v3dg
You obviously haven't made it to the end of the article...
...is available in 2GB to 16GB capacities.

Also, if anyone cares, the r/w on these things is 116/102.

If you are really limited in space though, 1.8" SSD's are barely bigger then this and can offer 3+ times the speed and much better size.
Actually I have - I am well aware that they go up to 16Gb - but they used 2Gb as a starting point and imo thats a pointless product - they wouldnt have mentioned it if they werent selling 2Gb SSD cards/modules.
Posted on Reply
#6
Completely Bonkers
The 2GB version isnt meant for desktop PC applcations. Think router, think telephone PBX, think cable TV decoder, think digital scanner, think colour printer, think webcam... all of these devices require more memory than a typical standard bios/eeprom can provide. Current solutions are proprietary to each product and non-standard internal storage solutions are expensive to design, develop and manufacture. Whereas this product brings a 'low capacity' standard SATA storage connection to solve the memory needed for embedded software.
Posted on Reply
#7
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
by: Completely Bonkers
The 2GB version isnt meant for desktop PC applcations. Think router, think telephone PBX, think cable TV decoder, think digital scanner, think colour printer, think webcam... all of these devices require more memory than a typical standard bios/eeprom can provide
how many of the products you mentioned have a port where you can plug a sata drive in?? there are better ways of having a 2Gb SSD installed - such as having it integrated solderd/fused into the board rather then something you could just take out n plug in like a sata hard drive/SSD whenever you want to.
Posted on Reply
#8
1freedude
Is this a mini pci-e interface, like eeepc or sata 3 gB and sata power?

Edit...looks like a tyco interface part.
Posted on Reply
#9
Mussels
Moderprator
freedom: these would likely be used as non consumer OS drives. linux servers, embedded devices (smoothwalls/uber routers/etc)
Posted on Reply