Monday, November 22nd 2010

Kingston Announces SSDNow S100 Series Lightweight SSDs for Industry Applications

Kingston announced a new line of solid state drives (SSDs) under the SSDNow S100 series, which are meant for non-PC industry uses, such as industrial embedded computer nodes, industrial automation machinery, etc. The drives are available in the 2.5" SATA form-factor, supporting SATA 3 Gb/s interface. Available in capacities of 8 GB and 16 GB, the S100 SSDs offer transfer speeds of 90 MB/s read and 30 MB/s write (8 GB model); 230 MB/s read and 75 MB/s write (16 GB model). An MTBF of 1 million hours is rated. The 8 GB drive is priced at €41, and the 16 GB model at €57.
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13 Comments on Kingston Announces SSDNow S100 Series Lightweight SSDs for Industry Applications

#2
NdMk2o1o
by: hayder.master
8 GB, what for
by: btarunr
which are meant for non-PC industry uses, such as industrial embedded computer nodes, industrial automation machinery, etc.
:slap: :laugh:
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#3
Completely Bonkers
by: hayder.master
8 GB, what for
by: btarunr
...which are meant for non-PC industry uses, such as industrial embedded computer nodes, industrial automation machinery, etc.


Oh, Nd beat me to it! LOL. Never mind, it will help you remember the lesson! :roll:
Posted on Reply
#4
Reefer86
lightweight.....when were they ever heavy
Posted on Reply
#5
Completely Bonkers
by: Reefer86
lightweight.....when were they ever heavy
LOL.

by: btarunr
16 GB model at €57
That's a pretty cheap way to upgrade your PC's memory management with a whopping pagefile, esp. for PC's at slot capacity. Very nice for photoshoppers and VM machines etc. A cheap way to upgrade a HDD based workstation, or to expand an existing SSD machine. Pagefile and all temps onto this "throw-away" drive to reduce wear leveling on your other SSD.
Posted on Reply
#6
RejZoR
It's too slow even for that. For 57€ you can get really fast 500GB or even 1TB drives. As for the SSD's, there are other bigger options that are faster and only slightly more expensive.
Posted on Reply
#8
AsRock
TPU addict
A pagefile maybe although i am already excluded from that if using a windows managed one. Then again excluded anyways as i turn the pagefile off..
Posted on Reply
#9
NdMk2o1o
by: hayder.master
ok clever guys, so still my question standing, ok if u don't understand me i will be more clear, "just like what" give a damn device u thing this one will be useful
Embedded computer nodes as stated, thin clients, netbooks, industrial grade pc's, what more do you want us to say that isn't OBVIOUS from the information in the OP? :rolleyes:
Posted on Reply
#10
Hayder_Master
by: NdMk2o1o
Embedded computer nodes as stated, thin clients, netbooks, industrial grade pc's, what more do you want us to say that isn't OBVIOUS from the information in the OP? :rolleyes:
thanx for replay
so that's is the main point, so 8G let we say for mini notebooks???, i see it's not useful cuz it's still 2.5" not a 1.8" so it's same size of laptops HDD and other bigger size SSD, maybe it was useful in old times when SSD's release i see before more than a year Asus mini notebook with 4G SSD and it's was only enough for windows vista (mini laptops windows is different also less size) and small applications and if u want use much applications or store some data there is SD memory support but now it's different, prices going down so as an example mini laptop Atom cpu with 8G SSD cost 250$ and same one with 16G SSD cost 280$ which one u going to get??
and if u see the new normal laptops come with more than 200G SSD now.
also there is an USB3 support now and memory sticks are very cheap comparing with SSD and also it's have high speed and high performance.
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#11
Completely Bonkers
Fair question. Just a couple of examples:

Many devices/peripherals have an "OS", an "application", and store "data". They have relatively limited function; they are designed to do one thing, and just one thing, well.

e.g. a networked digital scanner, that will scan documents, OCR them, and output a PDF to a network folder, an email, or directly inject into a database or webpage, example HP 9250c

e.g. a GPS navigation system. For maps and application etc. They currently work off internal flash and/or SD cards. This is much faster than SDcard but like SD uses a univerally accepted coms bus rather than a proprietary flash storage design.

e.g. an airplane "black box recorder"

e.g. an industrial lathe or mechatronic/robotic production line

e.g. a (publishing quality) colour printer operating at 2400x1200dpi with MASSIVE spool sizes

e.g. internet booth terminal

e.g. military equipment

... list goes on. Basically any device that is based on a CPU controller technology that has an "OS", "application" and "data", but is not a PC.
Posted on Reply
#12

How about you local ATM, digital telephone booths, modern ticket booth machines, new modern digital info panels, etc ;)

Then, industrial modern CNC machines, automatic plotters from big printing companies, etc
Posted on Edit | Reply
#13
Wile E
Power User
by: RejZoR
It's too slow even for that. For 57€ you can get really fast 500GB or even 1TB drives. As for the SSD's, there are other bigger options that are faster and only slightly more expensive.
This will be faster for pagefile usage. Random access is what counts there.
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