Wednesday, December 29th 2010

LucidLogix GPU Virtualization to Reform Entertainment PC Power Consumption

The pioneer of multivendor/multi-GPU graphic solutions, LucidLogix today announced ground-breaking GPU virtualization software designed for Intel Sandy Bridge platforms. With this technology, next generation PCs will dynamically balance the advanced power-efficient, built-in media features of Sandy Bridge processor graphics with the high-end, DirectX 11 3D performance features of discrete GPUs, while significantly reducing the power drain of traditional entertainment desktops.

Called Virtu, the Lucid GPU virtualization software is able to assign tasks in real time to the best available graphics resource based on power, performance and features considerations, with no need for additional hardware. If high end graphics power is needed for applications like DirectX 11, high-resolution 3D gaming, the system will assign the job to the discrete GPU. If not, the discrete GPU automatically goes into idle mode, while heat drops, fan speed slows down and GPU utilization goes down to zero, resulting in a green, power-efficient, long-lasting system.

“What we have really accomplished here is a seamless visual experience where it is not necessary to choose between the amazingly rich media features of Intel Sandy Bridge platform, like HD playback and powerful video transcoding, and the high-end 3D graphics functionality and performance of a discrete GPU,” said Offir Remez, LucidLogix president and founder. “Now it is possible to experience a no-guilt, nocompromise PC entertainment experience, and save on energy at the same time.”

Designed for entry-level through mainstream PCs equipped with second generation Intel’s Core i3/i5/i7 and NVIDIA or AMD 3D GPUs, Virtu software automatically adjusts the performance, thermal and feature allocation based on the requirements of individual applications. The only system requirement is to always connect the display screen directly to the motherboard’s Sandy Bridge display output (DVI, HDMI, etc).

Recently demonstrated to the world’s top ODM and OEM system manufacturers, Remez added, “Customer feedback has been tremendous, since Virtu addresses a longstanding challenge in the market for dynamic resource allocation. Now desktops, which in real life rarely get shut down, will have the maximum graphics performance and features when they need it, while saving energy when they do not.”

Interested parties can evaluate a demo version of Lucid Virtu immediately and a beta version will be available in January 2011. In addition, the software will be demonstrated in a private suite in Las Vegas during the upcoming CES show, January 6-9.
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35 Comments on LucidLogix GPU Virtualization to Reform Entertainment PC Power Consumption

#1
Mussels
Moderprator
shiny. i want it.
Posted on Reply
#2
Thatguy
oh this is gonna suck something horriable.what it really is, is offloading from the gpu to the cpu cores, since intel doesn't know how to make a gpu core.
Posted on Reply
#3
Mussels
Moderprator
by: Thatguy
oh this is gonna suck something horriable.what it really is, is offloading from the gpu to the cpu cores, since intel doesn't know how to make a gpu core.
... no



it changes which video card is doing the rendering, and passes the video output to the onboard.


its a power saving feature, in effect.
Posted on Reply
#4
wolf
Performance Enthusiast
A very itneresting concept, I am keen to see how it works out, not as keen as sandy bridge itself tho.
Posted on Reply
#5
Thatguy
by: Mussels
... no



it changes which video card is doing the rendering, and passes the video output to the onboard.


its a power saving feature, in effect.
horseshit, its a marketing gimmick.
Posted on Reply
#6
AlienIsGOD
by: Thatguy
horseshit, its a marketing gimmick.
your a gimmick :D
Posted on Reply
#7
LittleLizard
so this is some sort of Nvidia optimus but available to all desktop/laptop/ATI/NVIDIA computers that uses a sandy bridge CPU?
Posted on Reply
#8
caleb
Interesting yet the idea is kinda old. You always take a smaller 2 seater around town and a van on a highway but what when you have a family of 5 ? This will work well untill windows GUI starts using more and more D3D.

by: AlienIsGOD
your a gimmick :D
What's a gimmick? I'm Polish.
Posted on Reply
#9
Ghost
by: Mussels
... no



it changes which video card is doing the rendering, and passes the video output to the onboard.


its a power saving feature, in effect.
So it's like Hybrid SLi and Hybrid CFX?
Posted on Reply
#10
caleb
No its not like SLI/CFX.
Desktop,low requierment tasks = onboard GPU
Bad Company 2 = your main GPU
Posted on Reply
#11
Bo$$
like optimus but for any card
Posted on Reply
#12
Swamp Monster
That Hybrid CFX was similar thing. it used only onboard for low demanding tasks, but switched to crossfire with normal graphics card when gaming, so not really the same. Oh, and only low level graphics card was suitable:ohwell:.
Posted on Reply
#13
entropy13
by: Swamp Monster
That Hybrid CFX was similar thing. it used only onboard for low demanding tasks, but switched to crossfire with normal graphics card when gaming, so not really the same. Oh, and only low level graphics card was suitable:ohwell:.
Those "Hybrid's" are brand-dependent and only works because of the chipsets used on the motherboard.
Posted on Reply
#14
streetfighter 2
I like anything that can save me some scratch on my power bill. Ultimately I'd like desktop performance with laptop power usage. That would be a good day!
by: caleb
This will work well untill windows GUI starts using more and more D3D.
I sincerely doubt that. The extent that Windows utilizes D3D requires very little GPU horsepower. I don't see it getting that much more demanding in the future.
Posted on Reply
#15
Mussels
Moderprator
by: Ghost
So it's like Hybrid SLi and Hybrid CFX?
yes, but compatible with other brands GPU's (AMD/Nv)


so you could have the intel onboard paired with a 5870, and the 5870 would shut off when only sitting at the desktop.


This will mostly be useful in laptops for power saving features, not sure how well it would keep up with desktop GPU's
Posted on Reply
#16
ToTTenTranz
I wonder how this will compare to Fusion's integrated Crossfire system.
Posted on Reply
#17
VulkanBros
And of course it´s for Intel only - sucks :shadedshu
Posted on Reply
#18
Mussels
Moderprator
by: VulkanBros
And of course it´s for Intel only - sucks :shadedshu
well duh, its built into their CPU's
Posted on Reply
#19
VulkanBros
by: Mussels
well duh, its built into their CPU's
QUOTE:"LucidLogix today announced ground-breaking GPU virtualization software designed for Intel Sandy Bridge platforms"

I don´t think it´s "built" into their CPU.....It´s a piece of software taking advantage of some futures of the Sandy Bridge platform/chipset/CPU........or whatever....
Posted on Reply
#20
Mussels
Moderprator
by: VulkanBros
QUOTE:"LucidLogix today announced ground-breaking GPU virtualization software designed for Intel Sandy Bridge platforms"

I don´t think it´s "built" into their CPU.....It´s a piece of software taking advantage of some futures of the Sandy Bridge platform/chipset/CPU........or whatever....
its linking an external GPU to the sandy bridge IGP outputs. there has to be a hardware component to it as well.
Posted on Reply
#21
Spaceman Spiff
Confused. Seems kind of redundant. Don't gpus clock down automatically when not doing intensive 3d rendering? Its not like I get 100% usage when watching a movie or playing doom 2
Seems like more work and processing trying to figure out how to render something. Am I missing something?

Edit. Ok nevermind. Gpu usage goes to zero. Not almost zero.
Need to reed moar bettrr.
Posted on Reply
#22
VulkanBros
by: Mussels
its linking an external GPU to the sandy bridge IGP outputs. there has to be a hardware component to it as well.
You mean something like the LucidHydra chip? Well maybe you are right....but if I read this correct then it´s not about combining two diff. GPU vendors but to run either the discrete or the powerhorse....
Posted on Reply
#23
Swamp Monster
I kind of don't understand the usefulness of this thing, because GPU load @ desktop is already about 1%, and many modern Graphics cards use about 20W when idle. This thing could be useful only if it completely disables external graphics somehow(20W less power usage then).

*Edit* Or this is a gimmick to make use of otherwise not so useful embedded GPU, because it couldn't run games anyway?
Posted on Reply
#24
ToTTenTranz
by: Swamp Monster
I kind of don't understand the usefulness of this thing, because GPU load @ desktop is already about 1%, and many modern Graphics cards use about 20W when idle. This thing could be useful only if it completely disables external graphics somehow(20W less power usage then).

*Edit* Or this is a gimmick to make use of otherwise not so useful embedded GPU, because it couldn't run games anyway?
20W is still a lot for an idle state. In a notebook, 5-10W alone could make a difference of more than a hour in battery time.
Posted on Reply
#25
Cheeseball
22W (constant) is the difference between 1:19hr of operating time on my ASUS 1201N (Dual-core Atom w/ ION, non-Optimus). That's pretty big to me.
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