Thursday, January 13th 2011

ASRock Unveils E350M1 AMD Fusion ''Brazos'' Mini-ITX Motherboard

Better late than never. ASRock finally unveiled its mini-ITX motherboard based on the AMD Brazos platform, featuring AMD Fusion "Zacate" E-350 accelerated processing unit (APU). The APU integrates two x86-64 processing cores based on the "Bobcat" architecture with a DirectX 11 compliant AMD Radeon HD 6310 graphics processing core. The ASRock E350M1 is a typical mini-ITX embedded platform motherboard. The board draws power from a standard 24-pin ATX power connector (20-pin will do), though from the looks of it, the same PCB can be reconfigured to have a 2-pin 12V DC power external input for use in some very tight cases.

The APU is wired to two DDR3 DIMM slots, the lone expansion slot is a PCI-Express 2.0 x16 (electrical 2.0 x4). The E-350 APU and Hudson M1 chipset have separate heatsinks, the one over the APU is ventilated by a small fan. The chipset gives out four SATA 6 Gb/s ports, and one eSATA 6 Gb/s. Display connectivity includes one each of DVI, D-Sub, and HDMI. Other connectivity features include 8-channel HD audio with optical SPDIF output, gigabit Ethernet, mouse/keyboard combo PS/2, and a number of USB 2.0 ports.

Source: PC Treiber.net
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27 Comments on ASRock Unveils E350M1 AMD Fusion ''Brazos'' Mini-ITX Motherboard

#1
function69
Nice, but who uses liquid capacitors anymore?
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#2
suraswami
Nice! Good to see different variations. Hopefully the price is under $100.
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#3
TheLaughingMan
by: function69
Nice, but who uses liquid capacitors anymore?
Huh? How did you come to that conclusion?
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#4
freaksavior
To infinity ... and beyond!
by: function69
Nice, but who uses liquid capacitors anymore?
they do. :nutkick:

I like the asus with the big heatsink
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#5
AlienIsGOD
I like the abundance of options on the back for connectivity
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#6
satelitko
by: function69
Nice, but who uses liquid capacitors anymore?
You probably misread. We're talking 'bout ASRock here...
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#7
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
by: function69
Nice, but who uses liquid capacitors anymore?
liquid caps are used for all of the secondary stuff audio, USB etc solid caps are used for power on the board still

by: satelitko
You probably misread. We're talking 'bout ASRock here...
well you see its all a big misunderstanding asrock isn't a budsget brand anymore :p
Posted on Reply
#8
satelitko
by: cdawall
liquid caps are used for all of the secondary stuff audio, USB etc solid caps are used for power on the board still



well you see its all a big misunderstanding asrock isn't a budsget brand anymore :p
Well they've certainly improved in quality, but they still sit somewhere in the bottom of my list. I would not recommend them to anyone unless they really need a budget PC.
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#9
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
by: satelitko
Well they've certainly improved in quality, but they still sit somewhere in the bottom of my list. I would not recommend them to anyone unless they really need a budget PC.
some of their boards are quite good however they are still budget i put them above ECS and some others when shopping
Posted on Reply
#10
satelitko
by: cdawall
some of their boards are quite good however they are still budget i put them above ECS and some others when shopping
I agree, they really do. However - I've had asrock boards crap up on customers, where cheap-ass ECS boards last for an eternity. And I'm the kind of guy that judges by experience :)
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#11
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
by: satelitko
I agree, they really do. However - I've had asrock boards crap up on customers, where cheap-ass ECS boards last for an eternity. And I'm the kind of guy that judges by experience :)
dont worry i know how that is got a P4M800-pro that is still running to this day got a PD930 on it chugging along ;)
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#12
xBruce88x
AsRock has gotten better, but my 4CoreDual-VSTA is still running strong. when i first bought it i was running with 2x512mb xms ddr400, a pent. d 920, and a 128mb radeon 9600xt agp, IDE 160gb, I then went to 2x1gb xms2 ddr2 and a geforce 8600gt pci-e and a sata160. then upgraded yet again to a geforce 9600gt pci-e and an aftermarket cpu cooler and overclocked. It's now running 2x2gb supertalent ddr2 and a pentium e5300 with the help of a bios flash.

my only complaint about the board is the fact the pci-e only works at 4x electrical, and that its freaking huge and i need a monster case just to fit it.

from what i've seen of their newer products they've definitely made improvements.
Posted on Reply
#13
Mussels
Moderprator
by: AlienIsGOD
I like the abundance of options on the back for connectivity
same.

apart from wifi N, this board has just about everything you need in an ITX rig.
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#14
Josh154
Are the CPU's built in on ITX rigs?

Also i love my asrock x58 board. The only complaints i have about it is the nb cooling which the fixed on the newer models, and the BIOS is kind of lacking. Voltage adjustments are too large. For instance, my VTT goes from 1.340 to 1.410. It would be nice if there was more steps inbetween.
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#15
wahdangun
by: xBruce88x
AsRock has gotten better, but my 4CoreDual-VSTA is still running strong. when i first bought it i was running with 2x512mb xms ddr400, a pent. d 920, and a 128mb radeon 9600xt agp, IDE 160gb, I then went to 2x1gb xms2 ddr2 and a geforce 8600gt pci-e and a sata160. then upgraded yet again to a geforce 9600gt pci-e and an aftermarket cpu cooler and overclocked. It's now running 2x2gb supertalent ddr2 and a pentium e5300 with the help of a bios flash.

my only complaint about the board is the fact the pci-e only works at 4x electrical, and that its freaking huge and i need a monster case just to fit it.

from what i've seen of their newer products they've definitely made improvements.
i don't think 4X electrical was a downside for this type of CPU, especially who buy this won't pair it with HD 69XX and its PCIe 2.0 so the bandwith won't matter much
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#17
Athlonite
anybody ever wonder what ever happened to all those old P3 heat sink fans well now you know Asrock stole them for use on these mobo's
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#18
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: Athlonite
anybody ever wonder what ever happened to all those old P3 heat sink fans well now you know Asrock stole them for use on these mobo's
Heh, good thinking. :D
Posted on Reply
#19
zAAm
by: btarunr
though from the looks of it, the same PCB can be reconfigured to have a 2-pin 12V DC power external input for use in some very tight cases.
Doesn't really look like that to me... The missing output is probably for an optional integrated wireless card since it's marked ANT1 (antenna 1 presumably) and there's a spot for a mini-PCI-Express connector ;)

An onboard PSU would require a fair amount of motherboard real estate since it consists of at least a few larger regulators and capacitors.
Posted on Reply
#20
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: zAAm
Doesn't really look like that to me... The missing output is probably for an optional integrated wireless card since it's marked ANT1 (antenna 1 presumably) and there's a spot for a mini-PCI-Express connector ;)

An onboard PSU would require a fair amount of motherboard real estate since it consists of at least a few larger regulators and capacitors.
And it would produce a lot of heat as well.
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#21
zAAm
by: Frick
And it would produce a lot of heat as well.
Not necessarily. Take the picoPSU for instance. It's an extremely small SFF power supply and since it's very efficient (>95%), runs on 12V DC (so no massive filters and transformers necessary) and isn't rated for extreme loads to begin with, it produces very little heat.

You'd still have to get that components on the motherboard though (see the Zotac mini-itx boards with onboard psu's) and it will take up more space than is available on this board I believe. :cool:
Posted on Reply
#22
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
by: zAAm
Not necessarily. Take the picoPSU for instance. It's an extremely small SFF power supply and since it's very efficient (>95%), runs on 12V DC (so no massive filters and transformers necessary) and isn't rated for extreme loads to begin with, it produces very little heat.

You'd still have to get that components on the motherboard though (see the Zotac mini-itx boards with onboard psu's) and it will take up more space than is available on this board I believe. :cool:
they are closer to 8x% efficient according to jonnyguru he tested several of them and none came close to 90%
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#23
zAAm
by: cdawall
they are closer to 8x% efficient according to jonnyguru he tested several of them and none came close to 90%
No, they are >95% efficient on their own. The 12V power brick certainly brings down efficiency to the 8x% you mention here, but the power brick is not on the motherboard generating heat so it was beside my point ;)
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#24
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: zAAm
Not necessarily. Take the picoPSU for instance. It's an extremely small SFF power supply and since it's very efficient (>95%), runs on 12V DC (so no massive filters and transformers necessary) and isn't rated for extreme loads to begin with, it produces very little heat.
Oh, forgot about those. Motherboard (Brazos) + Pico PSU would be pretty rockin'.:)
Posted on Reply
#25
OneMoar
by: zAAm
Not necessarily. Take the picoPSU for instance. It's an extremely small SFF power supply and since it's very efficient (>95%), runs on 12V DC (so no massive filters and transformers necessary) and isn't rated for extreme loads to begin with, it produces very little heat.

You'd still have to get that components on the motherboard though (see the Zotac mini-itx boards with onboard psu's) and it will take up more space than is available on this board I believe. :cool:
its gotta have transformer it may not be IN the but it WILL have a power-brick of some sort
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