Monday, February 28th 2011

Greenliant Sampling World's First Industrial-Grade, Single-Package SATA SSD

Greenliant Systems, a leader in energy-efficient, highly secure and reliable solid-state storage products, is now sampling the industrial-grade version of its SATA interface NANDrive GLS85LS embedded solid-state drive (SSD) product family to select customers. Available in 2, 4 and 8 GB, the new NANDrive devices operate at temperatures between -40 and +85 degrees Celsius, giving customers long operating life and high reliability storage that can endure harsh environments.

The industrial-grade Greenliant NANDrive combines a SATA NAND controller with single-level cell (SLC) NAND flash die for a fully-integrated SSD in a multi-chip package. For applications requiring the durability and speed of solid-state storage in very small form factors, SATA NANDrive devices are one of the industry's smallest SSDs at 14mm x 24mm x 1.85mm. NANDrive is offered in a 145 ball grid array (BGA), 1mm ball pitch package for easy, space-saving and cost-effective mounting to a system motherboard.

"Designers of industrial electronics are concerned about the lifetime of their products and how changes in technology will affect those products," said Bing Yeh, CEO of Greenliant Systems. "NANDrive is an integrated SSD that addresses these concerns with robust wear leveling technology and advanced error correction code (ECC) algorithms. It extends the NAND flash lifetime and gives customers added protection against NAND flash supply issues."

NANDrive has the same footprint across all capacities, and can be easily upgraded in the field without host software and hardware changes. Compatible with many of today's popular chipsets, the SATA interface NANDrive does not require an additional bridge chip between the storage device and chipset.

Resistant to shock, vibration and humidity, the industrial-grade Greenliant NANDrive embedded SSD has been designed and tested to meet the durability and performance requirements of applications operating in extreme environments, including medical equipment, networking infrastructure, factory automation and automotive electronics.

The Greenliant-proprietary NANDrive design prevents data loss from unexpected power interruptions and read disturb. Its flexible security features make NANDrive an attractive option for secure data-storage applications, by allowing the user to set different protection levels within the SSD.

Availability
Greenliant is currently sampling the industrial-grade devices of it GLS85LS NANDrive line with customers on select product engagements.
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9 Comments on Greenliant Sampling World's First Industrial-Grade, Single-Package SATA SSD

#1
D4S4
i'd love to see motherboard manufacturers integrating these.
Posted on Reply
#2
CrAsHnBuRnXp
by: D4S4
i'd love to see motherboard manufacturers integrating these.
Why so they can deteriorate after 100,000 writes making them next to pointless to have especially if they're embedded?
Posted on Reply
#3
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
by: CrAsHnBuRnXp
Why so they can deteriorate after 100,000 writes making them next to pointless to have especially if they're embedded?
were did you get 100,000 writes?
Posted on Reply
#5
Tartaros
Why so they can deteriorate after 100,000 writes making them next to pointless to have especially if they're embedded?
It says 100 million writes in their web, not 100 thousand.
Posted on Reply
#6
zads
by: CrAsHnBuRnXp
Why so they can deteriorate after 100,000 writes making them next to pointless to have especially if they're embedded?
Regardless of the actual figure being higher,
You often make 100,000 write cycles on top something?
Posted on Reply
#7
theoneandonlymrk
by: CrAsHnBuRnXp
Why so they can deteriorate after 100,000 writes making them next to pointless to have especially if they're embedded?
probably same as a reg ssd in reliabillity, then yeh wots the point

they will be on mobos soon, as in built OS drives for quick boot and not necessarilly windows and they will be great just as my ssd is, as for the quick burnout, manufacturers suggest they should exceed 5 years as win7 for example auto configures itself to use it best (for the most part anyway) by turning off hyperfill, superfetch etc and if you dont re write the OS to it often it will easily last a fair while,l I hope.
Posted on Reply
#8
CrAsHnBuRnXp
by: cdawall
were did you get 100,000 writes?
MLC memory can last anywhere from 1,000 to 10,000 write cycles and SLC can have up to 100,000 write cycles before the SSD begins to fail. The article that the OP posted mentioned SLC. Thats where i get the 100,000 write cycle figure from.

Source
by: Tartaros
It says 100 million writes in their web, not 100 thousand.
Then I stand corrected.

by: zads
Regardless of the actual figure being higher,
You often make 100,000 write cycles on top something?
I often reinstall my OS which means I have to reinstall all my apps and everything else. Each time its writting to the ssd which means less write cycles I have left. I love the idea of the SSD, but the write cycles make it unreliable for me as they are more expensive than hard drives and if im going to wear it out in less than a year, its not worth having.
Posted on Reply
#9
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
by: CrAsHnBuRnXp
MLC memory can last anywhere from 1,000 to 10,000 write cycles and SLC can have up to 100,000 write cycles before the SSD begins to fail. The article that the OP posted mentioned SLC. Thats where i get the 100,000 write cycle figure from.

Source

Then I stand corrected.


I often reinstall my OS which means I have to reinstall all my apps and everything else. Each time its writting to the ssd which means less write cycles I have left. I love the idea of the SSD, but the write cycles make it unreliable for me as they are more expensive than hard drives and if im going to wear it out in less than a year, its not worth having.
going on 2 years benchmarking reinstalling on my supertalent i have yet to have an issue and if i were to guess i would say i have reinstalled my OS more than you or anyone else for that matter.
Posted on Reply