Wednesday, March 30th 2011

SilverStone Intros DC01 Single Drive NAS

Known more for its premium cases and PSUs, SilverStone occasionally ventures into speciality storage products, its latest being the DC01 "network data center". Simply put, it's a compact single drive NAS (network-attached storage) that can act as a print-server. Measuring 123 (W) x 123 (D) x 33 (H) mm, the DC01 can house one 2.5-inch SATA hard drive or solid state drive. Its storage can be expanded by connecting USB Mass Storage capable external hard drives or flash drives to its two USB 2.0 ports; and eSATA capable drives.

The DC01 connects to the network over one gigabit Ethernet link. It is driven by a dual-core ARM11 processor, that can drive the web-based iSharing interface. It supports BitTorrent and VPN clients, and can act as a DLNA, Apple iTunes, and print server. It is available in two colors, black and silver. Backed by a 1 year warranty, the SilverStone DC01 is priced at US $150.

Source: TechConnect Magazine
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10 Comments on SilverStone Intros DC01 Single Drive NAS

#2
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
interesting since it is from silverstone. seems larger though then a lot of other single drives NAS in that price range.
Posted on Reply
#3
t_ski
Former Staff
It would be nice if they had additional units that were designed the same way, but were just USB or eSATA drive housings that could attach to this unit. Then if you stacked up three or four of them, they would look nice and match.
Posted on Reply
#4
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
A NAS and a print server rolled into one?! Im gonna get me one of these!! slap in a 2TB HDD in and off we go!

#Edit 1#
On second thoughts -- whatever the biggest hard drive is available in 2.5" (1.5Tb??)

#Edit 2#
'If' it ever gets released in Europe....we all know how some companies dont like to distribute their merch overseas *SnEEzE*-Auzentech-*Cough*
Posted on Reply
#5
twicksisted
**Sigh**

You guys know what happens when you plug an external hard drive into a USB/Firewire port for a long time with no active cooling right? (specially wrapped up tight with no airflow for convection in a box)

... it heats up & breaks... ok, so lets take this product:

Single harddrive Nas with no active cooling wrapped up tight in a box..
Being a NAS its main purpose is for DATA storage 24/7 so it essentially needs to retain its data as its important enough to spend money buying a device to protect it in the first place...

What do we have here for the job?

No cooling, No redundancy if the drive fails... FAIL!!!
(though im sure not everyone has the foresight to share my sentiments and will prove it by buying into this crap ;)

EDIT: whats that you say?... 2.5" drives... they use them inlaptops and those are sealed.... lol... yeah great idea, but build a device for extra storage and put in the most expensive type of harddrive that you get... 2.5" large format SSD or HDD... nice... Though looking at the design, its only going to get bought by idiots or MAC users (i mean the same person, sorry for repeating myself but i diddnt want to confuse both as two different things) ;)
Posted on Reply
#6
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
by: twicksisted
**Sigh**

You guys know what happens when you plug an external hard drive into a USB/Firewire port for a long time with no active cooling right? (specially wrapped up tight with no airflow for convection in a box)

... it heats up & breaks... ok, so lets take this product:

Single harddrive Nas with no active cooling wrapped up tight in a box..
Being a NAS its main purpose is for DATA storage 24/7 so it essentially needs to retain its data as its important enough to spend money buying a device to protect it in the first place...

What do we have here for the job?

No cooling, No redundancy if the drive fails... FAIL!!!
(though im sure not everyone has the foresight to share my sentiments and will prove it by buying into this crap ;)

EDIT: whats that you say?... 2.5" drives... they use them inlaptops and those are sealed.... lol... yeah great idea, but build a device for extra storage and put in the most expensive type of harddrive that you get... 2.5" large format SSD or HDD... nice... Though looking at the design, its only going to get bought by idiots or MAC users (i mean the same person, sorry for repeating myself but i diddnt want to confuse both as two different things) ;)
I think it will be fine. If you look carefully at the first pic. you will see that theres a small gap between the enclosure and the cover.

I have 2 external hard drives one old 500GB maxtor and one 320Gb WD on 2 different machines, both on 24hrs a day with data being written to them constantly. 3-4years on and they are still just fine

secondly, no one lives in an oven. drives will run warm but i dont think they will get to the temperatures you are refering to.
Posted on Reply
#7
twicksisted
by: FreedomEclipse
I have 2 external hard drives one old 500GB maxtor and one 320Gb WD on 2 different machines, both on 24hrs a day with data being written to them constantly. 3-4years on and they are still just fine
if i had a Maxtor drive that lasted 3 years i think id believe it too ;)
Thats amazing :D
Posted on Reply
#8
theubersmurf
by: FreedomEclipse
A NAS and a print server rolled into one?! Im gonna get me one of these!! slap in a 2TB HDD in and off we go!

#Edit 1#
On second thoughts -- whatever the biggest hard drive is available in 2.5" (1.5Tb??)

#Edit 2#
'If' it ever gets released in Europe....we all know how some companies dont like to distribute their merch overseas *SnEEzE*-Auzentech-*Cough*
Isn't Silverston German?
Posted on Reply
#9
MikeMurphy
Argh.

Give me this device that holds a 3.5" drive, and sells for $75. I just want an ultra-simple NAS that runs at a reasonable speed!!!
Posted on Reply
#10
extrasalty
Overpriced junk made in China by the lowest bidder (Foxconn comes to mind), with no other use but suck Apple fanboys' dollars. Why bother with USB3 either- it looks so kewl. And by the way 2.5" generate too little heat to be actively cooled. Reliability is a whole another story though.

No redundancy and no ZFS is a recipe for disaster.
Posted on Reply