Wednesday, April 20th 2011

ASUS P6Z68-V Pro Pictured, Detailed

Pictures of ASUS' upcoming upper-mid range LGA1155 motherboard based on the Intel Z68 chipset, the P8Z68-V Pro surfaced on Chinese websites, revealing what comes across as a blend of P8P67's feature-set, and P8H67's display connectivity (which is what Z68 is all about). The new board makes use of a 14-phase Digi+ VRM to power the CPU. Highlights include CPU overclocking features driven by the UEFI BIOS, coupled with Intel Flexible Display Interface, letting you make use of the processor's embedded Intel HD 3000 graphics with Intel QuickSync accelerated video encoding. Further, the board is Lucid Virtu certified, letting you use (and switch between, depending on graphics load) both the integrated and discrete graphics simultaneously, and saving power in the process.

Expansion slots include two PCI-Express 2.0 x16 (electrical x8 with both populated), one PCI-Express x16 (electrical x4), two PCI-Express x1, and two PCI. This wholesome expansion area is backed by a wealth of connectivity options, including four SATA 6 Gb/s ports (two from PCH, two from Marvell controller), four SATA 3 Gb/s internal, and one eSATA 3 Gb/s; display connectivity that includes one each of dual-link DVI, D-Sub, and HDMI 1.4a; 8-channel HD audio with optical SPDIF output; four USB 3.0 (two internal/by header), a number of USB 2.0 ports, FireWire (by header), Bluetooth, and gigabit Ethernet. A number of overclocking features found on P8P67 series motherboards are present.

Source: mydrivers.com
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9 Comments on ASUS P6Z68-V Pro Pictured, Detailed

#1
Chaitanya
Hardwarezone has a done a detailed overview of this board on their website. Here is the link to that page.
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#3
erixx
thats right caleb... or looks so ;)
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#4
silkstone
I'm pretty sure that the difference in power consumption between on-cpu video and a mid to hi-end gpu would be more than 10 W.
I imagine this would put the dedicated GPU on sleep mode while in 2d and turn it on for games, it actually sounds pretty good, and is what the latest laptops have.

The difference between a 6970 and GF 210 is pretty substantial. http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/MSI/HD_6970_Lightning/21.html

In theory the on-die GPUs will use a lot less energy than a 210.
Posted on Reply
#5
slyfox2151
by: silkstone
I'm pretty sure that the difference in power consumption between on-cpu video and a mid to hi-end gpu would be more than 10 W.
I imagine this would put the dedicated GPU on sleep mode while in 2d and turn it on for games, it actually sounds pretty good, and is what the latest laptops have.

The difference between a 6970 and GF 210 is pretty substantial. http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/MSI/HD_6970_Lightning/21.html

In theory the on-die GPUs will use a lot less energy than a 210.
whats the power difference between idle 2D clocks and sleep? can the cards even go lower then idle 2D?

i doubt it would save very much power at all.
http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/HD_6670/20.html

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/MSI/GTX_580_Lightning/21.html
the 570 only use's 25 watts..... 560 even less at 14 watts....

most cards use less then 40 watts... add in the fact you are now running an onboard GPU as well as the dedicated card, the savings are even less.




anyone running the highest end cards are not likely worried about idle power consumption.... when the difference is less then 60 watts.
Posted on Reply
#6
caleb
Another note on the Lucid thing is the fact that most gamers will go 120Hz soon even if its not for 3D glasses and this needs to be ran through the Video outputs of the motherboard to work. Unless you can somehow run dual-dvi over HDMI+DVI outputs.
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#7
EastCoasthandle
They are only using mid-range boards for the Z68 chipset? I was wondering if they would use a ROG or Deluxe...
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#8
Trackr
Didn't anyone notice the typo in the first word in the title?
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