Friday, May 13th 2011

Thermaltake Unveils New Meka G Unit Mechanical Keyboard Variant

Thermaltake is readying a new variant of its Meka G mechanical gaming keyboard under the Tt eSports banner. Called the Tt eSports Meka G Unit, the new keyboard, according to the company, will be the first mechanical keyboard with onboard memory and individual key illumination and key map-based illumination (only those keys that a game is bound to will be illuminated, which can quickly switch to all-illuminated when text-chatting in-game).

The keyboard switches between "Game Mode", in which accidental keystrokes are minimized, and normal mode. The ISS (Instant Shift System) advanced macro key shifting function allows Gamer to reach all 60 macro keys within one profile. The Meka G Unit uses Cherry Black switches that provide good tactile feedback without the "clickity" noise. As a mechanical keyboard, the Meka has a longer key lifespan than common membrane-type keyboards, with the switches supporting 50 million keystrokes each.

Apart from macro keys, there are 7 multimedia keys, a USB hub with two USB 2.0 ports, and two audio ports (extended from the PC sound card). The cables are 1.8 m long, are braided, and with gold-plated connectors. Thermaltake plans to release its new keyboard at Computex.
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16 Comments on Thermaltake Unveils New Meka G Unit Mechanical Keyboard Variant

#1
DanishDevil
Cherry MX Blacks have zero tactile feedback. They are smooth until they bottom out. Cherry MX Browns have no clickity noise with tactile feedback. Thermaltake really needs to at least know the switches they're putting to their keyboards, although I do praise them for not going with Cherry MX Blues in a gaming keyboard.
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#3
blaznee
Buh, I want a gamer keyboard with Cherry Browns...
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#4
jalex3
they need a browns option, but its got the same dumb layout as their other model :banghead:. why cant das make a nice gaming moddle with backlight and 6/12 macros. :respect:
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#5
Kitkat
law suit from 50 cent
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#6
KashunatoR
who needs macros and back-lit keys?
steeleseries 6gv2 still the best :)
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#8
AsRock
TPU addict
by: KashunatoR
who needs macros and back-lit keys?
steeleseries 6gv2 still the best :)
Kinda wondering why i did not get that. Although maybe it was because i like clicky switches and i don't see were you can remap keys.

Witht he blackwidow you can map all but 1 key to were you like it which is totally cool as being left handed some games like Farcry 2 and Fallout 3 just to name a few there key setup in game sucks for the odd key.

Anyways i do like the look of this one but TT erm..
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#9
Ross211
by: DanishDevil
Cherry MX Blacks have zero tactile feedback. They are smooth until they bottom out. Cherry MX Browns have no clickity noise with tactile feedback. Thermaltake really needs to at least know the switches they're putting to their keyboards, although I do praise them for not going with Cherry MX Blues in a gaming keyboard.
I've had a really good experience using the Razer Black Widow that has Cherry MX Blue switches. I probably would have gone for this Thermaltake board if it were out when I bought this Razer.

What bothers you with your Razer Black Widow ? Keys getting hit when you don't want them to ?

Info stolen from Overclock.net on Switches -
Cherry MX-Black switches are linear (non-tactile) switches, these are considered one of the best switch types for gaming. When gaming, having a tactile bump does absolutely nothing because you're going to be bottoming out anyway. So these give you a very smooth feel. The actuation and release points are at the exact same position as well. So games that require a lot of double tapping become easier than on any other keyswitch. However, most people don't enjoy typing on them that much do in part, to their linear nature.
If you're a person who tends to hit a wrong key every so often while gaming, these will be beneficial in that the high actuation force will help prevent many of those accidental presses.
Cherry MX Blue switches are the best cherry switch for typing. The tactile bump can easily be felt, and the resistance is similar to your average keyboard.

Although many people find them just fine for gaming, some don't like the fact that the release point is above the actuation point. This can cause some trouble with double-tapping. This is usually the case with someone who has experienced other mechanical switches before hand.

As a note: this switch actually has a peak force of 60g, it is 50g at the point of actuation. This is due to the design of the Cherry switch itself.
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#10
Frederik S
Staff
You get tactile feedback with all keyboards from the keys bottoming out.

The Cherry MX Blue keys give you feedback at actuation point and at the bottom, which produces a click-type sound. In addition the Blue keys have an extra follower that adds one more click-type sound at the actuation point.
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#11
AsRock
TPU addict
by: Ross211
I've had a really good experience using the Razer Black Widow that has Cherry MX Blue switches. I probably would have gone for this Thermaltake board if it were out when I bought this Razer.

What bothers you with your Razer Black Widow ? Keys getting hit when you don't want them to ?

Info stolen from Overclock.net on Switches -
There's some thing that bothers me with mine and that's the caps lock lol. Other wise i think it's a sweet keyboard.

What gets me about most of these companys and they go on how good there keyboards are but only give a one year warranty with them lol.
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#12
KieranD
I cant really afford a keyboard that is £100 and over, so i looked at the razer blackwidow but this is supposed to have build quality issues with keys hitting other keys and just not feeling great overall, it uses MX Blues at £66 for the non ultimate version.

I know MX blues are tactile and clicky but about blacks any idea how much force you have to use?
I guess it depends on what price this Thermaltake will be overall to see if its a good deal.
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#14
LAN_deRf_HA
When are they going to make one of these mechanical boards with slim keys?? It feels so much better once you try it. Going back your fingers trip over the insane height of the old style. More and more people are getting accustomed to it between netbook and laptops anyways, and to top it off the keys already exist they just need to actually put them into a product. Hell since these are targeted at gamers they could even pull some marketing BS like "slim keys reduce press time" or something.
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#15
KieranD
by: LAN_deRf_HA
When are they going to make one of these mechanical boards with slim keys?? It feels so much better once you try it. Going back your fingers trip over the insane height of the old style. More and more people are getting accustomed to it between netbook and laptops anyways, and to top it off the keys already exist they just need to actually put them into a product. Hell since these are targeted at gamers they could even pull some marketing BS like "slim keys reduce press time" or something.
What do you mean slim keys? What like chiclet keyboards?
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#16
Semi-Lobster
I have a DAS Model S Professional that are Cherry Blues and I love the click clack sound. As somebody who had a Steelseries 6GV2 before (gave it to my brother for his birthday) I can honestly say that for gaming, personally (it can very well be different for other people of course) I found little difference but for typing the keyboard is fantastic, I use my keyboard equally for both, both keyboards though are leagues more responsive than a membrane keyboard of though. Also I find the click-clack a little relaxing, maybe because the first keyboard I learned to type on was an old IBM Model M...
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