Monday, May 30th 2011

ASUS ROG Launches Bigfoot Networks Killer E2100 Networking With New AMD Motherboard

Bigfoot Networks, the technology company behind the Killer line of high-performance networking products, today at Computex announced that ASUS has expanded its line of Killer E2100-based motherboards with their new ROG Crosshair V Formula/ThunderBolt Motherboard.

The new ASUS ROG Crosshair V Formula/ThunderBolt Motherboard supports AMD FX Series CPUs with up to 8-cores, DDR3 Memory with overclocking speeds up to 2133 MHz, multi-GPU technology for CrossFireX and NVIDIA SLI, 8-ch HD, SupremeFX X-Fi 2 audio from Creative Labs and more. Powered by Bigfoot Networks' Killer E2100 networking platform and a host of other gaming-centric features, this AMD FX-based motherboard combines innovative design and technical intelligence to make the PC gaming experience more rewarding and accessible. This is the second motherboard offering from ASUS to incorporate Killer E2100 gaming network capabilities, preceded by the ROG Rampage III Black Edition.

The ASUS ROG Crosshair V Formula/ThunderBolt is among the first Killer E2100-based motherboards to ship with Bigfoot's new Advanced Stream Detect feature. Advanced Stream Detect automatically classifies all network traffic and prioritizes streams that are particularly sensitive to network performance and latency, such as HD video, online games, video and audio conferencing, voice chat and more. As a result, users can watch videos while downloading large files, send instant messages and play games simultaneously, or navigating the Web while video conferencing without all of the pausing and stuttering associated with slower, less intelligent networking solutions.

"We have seen a tremendous response to our ROG Rampage III Black Edition motherboard and ThunderBolt expansion module using the embedded Killer E2100 networking platform," said Kris Huang, product line manager, ASUS. "With the addition of Bigfoot Networks' Advanced Stream Detect technology to the Killer E2100, we are excited to add this great new capability to our ASUS ROG Crosshair V Formula/ThunderBolt motherboard and provide our customers the best online experience for all their online games, streaming video and audio."

"We are excited that Asus has added our Killer E2100 networking technology to their new line of AMD-based ROG Crosshair V Formula/ThunderBolt Motherboards," said Michael Howse, CEO of Bigfoot Networks. "When industry innovators such as ASUS recognize the value of our exclusive technologies like Game Networking DNA™ and Advanced Stream Detect and offer it on multiple platforms, it reaffirms our passion for creating the fastest, most intelligent networking products for online games, HD video and real-time internet applications."

The ASUS ROG Crosshair V Formula/ThunderBolt motherboard will be available for purchase at the end of June 2011. For more details on ASUS motherboards with embedded Bigfoot Networks Killer E2100 technology, visit http://press.asus.com/computex2011/rog/. For more information on Bigfoot's Killer E2100 platform and supported products, visit http://www.bigfootnetworks.com/killer-e2100/.

Bigfoot Networks' Advanced Stream Detect technology is now available for all of its networking platforms including Killer E2100 embedded networking platforms (such as the ASUS ROG Rampage III Black Edition motherboard), Killer 2100 add-in cards as well as the Killer Wireless-N family of wireless networking adapters. Current Killer 2100 and Killer E2100 customers can obtain a free update to Advanced Stream Detect, by visiting bigfootnetworks.com/ASD.
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13 Comments on ASUS ROG Launches Bigfoot Networks Killer E2100 Networking With New AMD Motherboard

#2
Lionheart
N-I-C-E When and where can I buy;)
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#3
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: Lionheart
N-I-C-E When and where can I buy;)
After June 15, at a store near you that sells ASUS ROG products.
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#4
Activeduke
Havent seen a network card that size since I looked inside my old Presario :rockout:
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#5
Vancha
Last I heard, Bigfoot Networks hadn't managed to make their cards do anything more than "practically nothing". Has this since changed?
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#6
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
by: Vancha
Last I heard, Bigfoot Networks hadn't managed to make their cards do anything more than "practically nothing". Has this since changed?
If they really made it do something. do you think they would need to bundle it with a board manufacturer to FORCE people to buy it??

answer is no. they still do nothing, Bigfoot is sucking Asus dick trying to make their end of year report amazing so when they take it to the CO of bigfoot networks in his big boardroom. they can happily declare that they shifted millions thousands of units because people actually genuinely WANTED to buy their products. when in reality, no one could care less. and as almost all online reviews have stated. for the same price of the killer Nic you can buy other components that will boost your performance more then just a few more fps which Bigfoot claims to give you.

its hard to believe that they once called this product revolutionary.
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#7
TheLaughingMan
by: FreedomEclipse
If they really made it do something. do you think they would need to bundle it with a board manufacturer to FORCE people to buy it??

answer is no. they still do nothing, Bigfoot is sucking Asus dick trying to make their end of year report amazing so when they take it to the CO of bigfoot networks in his big boardroom. they can happily declare that they shifted millions thousands of units because people actually genuinely WANTED to buy their products. when in reality, no one could care less. and as almost all online reviews have stated. for the same price of the killer Nic you can buy other components that will boost your performance more then just a few more fps which Bigfoot claims to give you.

its hard to believe that they once called this product revolutionary.
While I agree they are doing this to get their products in people's hands, this is not force. All the boards that do and will have the Killer NIC charge about a $65 to $75 premium for the card so you are still paying for it.

Second it does not do nothing. While the boost in FPS is minimal, the Killer NIC does more than that. It helps to prevent lag and directly addresses latency issues. I have a friend who does reviews who also thought Killer was a gimmick when he tested the G1 Assassin board. He found out in testing it help in Bad Company 2 a lot by reduces his issues with ghosting, hit detection, and stutter caused by packet lose and latency.

Is the difference huge? Not really. Does it work exactly like they say? Yeah it does. Will it help you while you game? That is up to you, but I would say yes.

And before you say this is second hand info. I was with him in BC2 during the tests on mutually crap servers. While we both had issues, he could kill moving people consistently and I could not.
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#8
jasper1605
How does a card inside of your pc help with packet loss and lag? Isn't that more on the ISP end of things?
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#9
Fourstaff
by: jasper1605
How does a card inside of your pc help with packet loss and lag? Isn't that more on the ISP end of things?
Shhhh, Bigfoot might sue you for defamation! I am very disappointed with Asus, they could have given us better things like cheaper price.
Posted on Reply
#10
TheLaughingMan
by: jasper1605
How does a card inside of your pc help with packet loss and lag? Isn't that more on the ISP end of things?
It is usually delay on the server end due to traffic or on your end due to network congestion or CPU busy doing other things. Its not that the packet did not arrive, but it is that they are not being processed fast enough.

Enemy on screen at point A, but the server knows he is at point B. You fire, server counts that as a miss even though you clearly can see him being shot on your screen because your screen is show out dated info. because several packets of data got congested in your system. In the same situation, the Killer NIC (and cards like it) will see the game packet and process it first, ignoring your buddies on VOIP for a few ms.

In both cases you system got the packets. The Killer was just quick enough to the draw to give you a more accurate view of the battlefield. FPS traffic is unique as network traffic error correction will always require dropping out dated packets to stay in sync with a server. The Killer NIC would reduce the number of times this has to happen because it manages the network better.

It is not just the card, there is a lot of software work going on with the card as well.
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#11
Lionheart
by: btarunr
After June 15, at a store near you that sells ASUS ROG products.
I didn't think anyone was gonna reply but cheerz mate!
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#12
kirtar
Honestly if you're already running Intel LAN, I don't see why you'd bother with it. If anything, I would imagine that other home network components (such as your router) would cause more problems. Either way, I don't see it as worth the extra money. Also, last I checked the board itself has some features that perform a similar function.
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#13
xBruce88x
everytime i see e2100 i think of a pentium dual-core/core 2.

i remember the ad they bombarded on gametrailers.com when killer nic was a new thing. every time i went to check out a vid i'd have to watch their ad.

i've really never needed one though... I think they'd do more good in an xbox360 lol

i'm sure they have their place with the CAL people and such.
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