Monday, May 30th 2011

Corsair Expands Professional Series and Professional Series Gold PSU Lines

Corsair, a worldwide designer and supplier of high-performance components to the PC gaming hardware market, today announced the Professional Series HX1050 and Professional Series Gold AX650 high-performance power supplies.

The Professional Series HX1050 delivers 1,050 watts of continuous power and joins the Professional Series HX1000, HX850, HX750, and HX650. The Professional Series HX1050 is 80 PLUS Silver certified, with a rated 88% efficiency or higher at 50% load.

The Professional Series Gold AX650 delivers 650 Watts of continuous power and joins the Professional Series Gold AX750, AX850, and AX1200. Like the rest of the series, the AX650 is 80 PLUS Gold certified, delivering greater than 90% energy efficiency at 50% load.

Professional Series models include fixed ATX 12V connectors and modular cable sets that allow system builders to use only the cables they need. Professional Series Gold models are fully modular, with detachable ATX12V cables and low-profile, flat cable designs to reduce air friction. Both families offer variable-speed fans, unflinching voltage stability, and other performance specifications that are so important to high-end, performance-oriented PC systems.

"We are expanding our top two PSU lines thanks to the continued strong demand from performance enthusiasts for highly reliable, super-efficient power supplies." said Ruben Mookerjee, VP and General Manager for Components at Corsair. "While dependability is an absolute requirement for world-class PC builds, power requirements do vary by system. These new models provide expert system builders with even more flexibility in choosing the right power supply for their needs."

The Professional Series HX1050 is available from Corsair-authorized retailers worldwide for a US suggested retail price of $239 USD. The Professional Series Gold will be available in June from Corsair-authorized retailers worldwide for a US suggested retail price of $169 USD. For more information on Corsair power supplies, please visit the Corsair web site.
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9 Comments on Corsair Expands Professional Series and Professional Series Gold PSU Lines

#1
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
I wonder if the HX1050 is really 80+ Silver certified, or if Corsair is fibbing like they did with the HX850/750...
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#2
EaGle1337
Except the hx750 and 850 did do silver...
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#3
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: EaGle1337
Except the hx750 and 850 did do silver...
No they didn't. Look it up, they did Gold.
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#4
EaGle1337
by: newtekie1
No they didn't. Look it up, they did Gold.
only gold at 25 degrees, which is why corsair down labeled them from gold to silver, once temperatures hit what you'd normally hit in real life it didn't do 80+ gold
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#5
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: EaGle1337
only gold at 25 degrees, which is why corsair down labeled them from gold to silver, once temperatures hit what you'd normally hit in real life it didn't do 80+ gold
They pulled 80+ Gold at room temperature, which is all that is required for 80+ Gold. The temperature doesn't matter, the units were 80+ Gold certified. The reasoning behind Corsair labelling them as 80+ Silver is anyone's guess.
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#6
EaGle1337
by: newtekie1
They pulled 80+ Gold at room temperature, which is all that is required for 80+ Gold. The temperature doesn't matter, the units were 80+ Gold certified. The reasoning behind Corsair labelling them as 80+ Silver is anyone's guess.
Yes because above 25 degrees it didn't do gold, most temps in a psu tends to be around -40 degrees, in which it does 80+ silver... 25 degrees is far from normal operating temps, it's also how a lot of bogus power ratings are done. peak rating at 25 degrees.
Also most rooms aren't at 25 degrees.
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#7
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: EaGle1337
Yes because above 25 degrees it didn't do gold, most temps in a psu tends to be around -40 degrees, in which it does 80+ silver... 25 degrees is far from normal operating temps, it's also how a lot of bogus power ratings are done. peak rating at 25 degrees.
Also most rooms aren't at 25 degrees.
Room temperature is 25°C, that is 77°F, so I bet a lot of rooms are at the temperature(mines at 76°F right now), in fact I would bet there are a lot of rooms cooler than that actually(and a lot of rooms hotter too).

All of your arguments don't matter. The actually certification states 25°C(room temperature). The units passed 80+ Gold at 25°C and were certified as 80+ Gold. Period.

You can argue that rooms are hotter than 25°C and the operating temps are often higher than 25°C, and I'm not going to disagree with you, but you'll have to take that up with the 80+ Certification body that set the rules because all power supplies are test at the 25°C standard.
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#8
EaGle1337
by: newtekie1

You can argue that rooms are hotter than 25°C and the operating temps are often higher than 25°C, and I'm not going to disagree with you, but you'll have to take that up with the 80+ Certification body that set the rules because all power supplies are test at the 25°C standard.
Yeah but it's a a bit of a rubbish standard imo. Since even psus that can't truely do their certified ratings due to cherry picked samples and the temps, as once the temps hit was most computer psus hit they die. look at raidmax's 1000kw 80+ gold unit.. it doesn't even do 80+ bronze but it's got 80+ gold certification.
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#9
Dr. Nick
As far as I'm concerned, complaining about a power supply that's rated and priced for Silver but peforms almost as good as gold is a little silly.

And about Kingwin, I wouldn't buy a Kingwin PSU if it was the last one in the world. Go with trusted brands and you're guaranteed to not get screwed.
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