Tuesday, June 14th 2011

FX Turbo Core Technology Bumps Frequency by 1.00 GHz

With Intel's introduction of Turbo Boost technology, a new feature was introduced to the industry, where a processor overclocks itself in short bursts to handle increased CPU loads. AMD quickly followed with its own similar feature, called Turbo Core, with Phenom II X6. With the company's upcoming high-end client FX-series processors, that technology is being given an update. On the FX-series processors, the technology is designed to bump clock speeds by as much as 1.00 GHz over the processor's advertised clock speed, within the processor's TDP headroom.

A company slide reveals that FX-series processors can run all cores at nominal speeds (advertised speeds), all cores at a bumped "Turbo" state, or with half the number of cores running at max turbo speeds with up to 1.00 GHz (5.0x BClk multiplier) increase in clock speeds, with the other half the number of cores in C6 state, completely shut off. Turbo Core ensures increased performance in applications that are designed to work with lesser number of cores, most games come in this category.

Source: DonanimHaber
Add your own comment

55 Comments on FX Turbo Core Technology Bumps Frequency by 1.00 GHz

#1
Zubasa
Where are my chips AMD?
Posted on Reply
#2
AphexDreamer
This seems like something they could have done a while back?

I suppose now that its automated that's a bit nice.
Posted on Reply
#3
Zubasa
by: AphexDreamer
This seems like something they could have done a while back?

I suppose now that its automated that's a bit nice.
What this is is that Turbo core now works exactly like Intel's Turbo Boost.
Posted on Reply
#4
MikeMurphy
I'm hoping these aggressive turbo speeds reflect additional overclocking headroom!

Please and thanks :)
Posted on Reply
#5
Wyverex
by: Zubasa
What this is is that Turbo core now works exactly like Intel's Turbo Boost.
No, not really.
Intel's Turbo Boost can't OC all the cores at the same time, this can.

by: MikeMurphy
I'm hoping these aggressive turbo speeds reflect additional overclocking headroom!

Please and thanks :)
From your mouth to the ears of gods of hardware :D
Posted on Reply
#6
LifeOnMars
by: Wyverex
No, not really.
Intel's Turbo Boost can't OC all the cores at the same time, this can.

From your mouth to the ears of gods of hardware :D
Are you sure about that ;)
Posted on Reply
#7
Crap Daddy
Intel's turbo on SB can overclock all cores albeit with only 100MHz.
Posted on Reply
#8
buggalugs
I'm guessing these turbo speeds will only be possible with a default CPU speed.

Thats fine by me. Running your CPU at 100% all the time with high voltage is dead......energy efficiency and dynamic overclocking is the future!!
Posted on Reply
#9
redzo
@btarunr, this article is misleading and wrong!
No manufacturer is ever going to sell a product guaranteed to function properly beyond its specifications! That's because reliable operation cannot be accomplished under this scenario.

You've started with:
"a processor overclocks itself in short bursts to handle increased CPU loads". That's true. It means overclocking.

Then you've contradicted yourself with:
"the technology is designed to bump clock speeds by as much as 1.00 GHz over the processor's advertised clock speed, within the processor's TDP headroom".
"within the processor's TDP headroom", this IS NOT overclocking.

The slide is also misleading because it fails to specify the manufacturer's TDP headroom for the "MAX turbo" state, as it doesn't specify that also for the other two states. I believe that's from where you've got the entire article wrong. The slide(proof) is just unprofessional.

You should edit this article.
Posted on Reply
#10
Fatal
by: Zubasa
Where are my chips AMD?
Me too :laugh: they need to hurry the hell up! Thanks for the info btarunr :toast:
Posted on Reply
#11
Nesters
I think it's pretty good if you can get 8-core FX @ 3.2ghz stock and use all 8 cores if you need them or use 4 cores @ 4.2ghz for games and stuff like that without manual OC.
Should raise the performance bar for 'normal' PC users who don't OC. Intel already does that but it's good to see it from AMD too, and don't forget about extra 4 cores.
Posted on Reply
#12
bucketface
by: redzo
@btarunr, this article is misleading and wrong!
No manufacturer is ever going to sell a product guaranteed to function properly beyond its specifications! That's because reliable operation cannot be accomplished under this scenario.

You've started with:
"a processor overclocks itself in short bursts to handle increased CPU loads". That's true. It means overclocking.

Then you've contradicted yourself with:
"the technology is designed to bump clock speeds by as much as 1.00 GHz over the processor's advertised clock speed, within the processor's TDP headroom".
"within the processor's TDP headroom", this IS NOT overclocking.

The slide is also misleading because it fails to specify the manufacturer's TDP headroom for the "MAX turbo" state, as it doesn't specify that also for the other two states. I believe that's from where you've got the entire article wrong. The slide(proof) is just unprofessional.

You should edit this article.
overclocking is still technically withing tdp, suicide runs on the other hand go beyond.. at least thats how i understand it.
Posted on Reply
#13
KRONOSFX
Crap Daddy: 100Mhz compared to 1Ghz makes for a big difference. I am comparing SB 2600K and BD 4-modul(8 thread), both of them have the same number of threads so while SB2600K gets just a small 100Mhz jump the AMD model will get a boost of 1Ghz while still using the same number of threads, which is 4 in this case.

P.S. I am not sure if turbo in SB 2600K works if HT is in use? on the other hand AMD still gives +500Mhz boost when using all 8 threads.
Posted on Reply
#14
Imsochobo
by: KRONOSFX
Crap Daddy: 100Mhz compared to 1Ghz makes for a big difference. I am comparing SB 2600K and BD 4-modul(8 thread), both of them have the same number of threads so while SB2600K gets just a small 100Mhz jump the AMD model will get a boost of 1Ghz while still using the same number of threads, which is 4 in this case.

P.S. I am not sure if turbo in SB 2600K works if HT is in use? on the other hand AMD still gives +500Mhz boost when using all 8 threads.
well its pretty much like this but amd have taken it one step further.
and C6 turning off cores alltogether is pretty impressive.
Posted on Reply
#15
KRONOSFX
ImsochoboI think they did a really great job this time.
Posted on Reply
#16
_JP_
by: Zubasa
Where are my chips AMD?
Agreed. Stop teasing damn it!
Posted on Reply
#17
b82rez
by: redzo
@btarunr, this article is misleading and wrong!
No manufacturer is ever going to sell a product guaranteed to function properly beyond its specifications! That's because reliable operation cannot be accomplished under this scenario.

You've started with:
"a processor overclocks itself in short bursts to handle increased CPU loads". That's true. It means overclocking.

Then you've contradicted yourself with:
"the technology is designed to bump clock speeds by as much as 1.00 GHz over the processor's advertised clock speed, within the processor's TDP headroom".
"within the processor's TDP headroom", this IS NOT overclocking.

The slide is also misleading because it fails to specify the manufacturer's TDP headroom for the "MAX turbo" state, as it doesn't specify that also for the other two states. I believe that's from where you've got the entire article wrong. The slide(proof) is just unprofessional.

You should edit this article.
Subbing just to see Btarunr's ownage reply. :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#18
Bo$$
Lab Extraordinaire
it is displaying 16 cores hint hint :p
Posted on Reply
#19
Zubasa
by: KRONOSFX
Crap Daddy: 100Mhz compared to 1Ghz makes for a big difference. I am comparing SB 2600K and BD 4-modul(8 thread), both of them have the same number of threads so while SB2600K gets just a small 100Mhz jump the AMD model will get a boost of 1Ghz while still using the same number of threads, which is 4 in this case.

P.S. I am not sure if turbo in SB 2600K works if HT is in use? on the other hand AMD still gives +500Mhz boost when using all 8 threads.
Bumping all the cores up 1Ghz will simply exceed the TDP of the chip, and so will 500Mhz.
With all 8-cores active it can bump up by maybe 1-multi which is 200Mhz at most.

Remember that this chip must be absolutely stable under AMD's stock cooling, and that is what the TDP is all about.
Many of these chips are going into factory pre-builds which runs on minimal cooling.
Posted on Reply
#20
Play3r
by: redzo
@btarunr, this article is misleading and wrong!
No manufacturer is ever going to sell a product guaranteed to function properly beyond its specifications! That's because reliable operation cannot be accomplished under this scenario.

You've started with:
"a processor overclocks itself in short bursts to handle increased CPU loads". That's true. It means overclocking.

Then you've contradicted yourself with:
"the technology is designed to bump clock speeds by as much as 1.00 GHz over the processor's advertised clock speed, within the processor's TDP headroom".
"within the processor's TDP headroom", this IS NOT overclocking.

The slide is also misleading because it fails to specify the manufacturer's TDP headroom for the "MAX turbo" state, as it doesn't specify that also for the other two states. I believe that's from where you've got the entire article wrong. The slide(proof) is just unprofessional.

You should edit this article.
It is overclocking by the fact that it shuts off half of the cores and boosts the other half so obviously its not going to be over the TDP of the whole processor. the cores by the selves are going over the individual spec of each core but not over the spec over the entire processor

"all cores at a bumped "Turbo" state, or with half the number of cores running at max turbo speeds with up to 1.00 GHz (5.0x BClk multiplier) increase in clock speeds, with the other half the number of cores in C6 state, completely shut off"
Posted on Reply
#21
redzo
by: b82rez
Subbing just to see Btarunr's ownage reply. :laugh:
No. The fist half of the article is completely unprofessional and wrong.

by: btarunr
With Intel's introduction of Turbo Boost technology, a new feature was introduced to the industry, where a processor overclocks itself in short bursts to handle increased CPU loads.
http://www.techpowerup.com/img/11-06-14/74a_thm.jpg

Source: DonanimHaber
Intel Turbo Boost is not an overclocking feature. AMD Turbo Core is not an overclocking feature. Yet that's what this quote says. As long as you do not exceed the manufacturer's specified TDP, you do not overclock. A CPU does not overclock by itself and there is no feature like this and there will never be one. Is it that hard to understand?
I'm really not that type of an individual. I do not require a special type of attention. I hope that you've got the point of my first quote. :laugh: ^2
Posted on Reply
#22
gumpty
by: redzo
@btarunr, this article is misleading and wrong!
No manufacturer is ever going to sell a product guaranteed to function properly beyond its specifications! That's because reliable operation cannot be accomplished under this scenario.

You've started with:
"a processor overclocks itself in short bursts to handle increased CPU loads". That's true. It means overclocking.

Then you've contradicted yourself with:
"the technology is designed to bump clock speeds by as much as 1.00 GHz over the processor's advertised clock speed, within the processor's TDP headroom".
"within the processor's TDP headroom", this IS NOT overclocking.

The slide is also misleading because it fails to specify the manufacturer's TDP headroom for the "MAX turbo" state, as it doesn't specify that also for the other two states. I believe that's from where you've got the entire article wrong. The slide(proof) is just unprofessional.

You should edit this article.
by: redzo
No. The fist half of the article is completely unprofessional and wrong.

Intel Turbo Boost is not an overclocking feature. AMD Turbo Core is not an overclocking feature. Yet that's what this quote says. As long as you do not exceed the manufacturer's specified TDP, you do not overclock. A CPU does not overclock by itself and there is no feature like this and there will never be one. Is it that hard to understand?
I'm really not that type of an individual. I do not require a special type of attention. I hope that you've got the point of my first quote. :laugh: ^2
Frequency bump = overclock; regardless of whether it stays within the TDP or not. You don't get to define what an overclock is and isn't.

Apart from that. Can't wait till these hit the reviewer's desks. :toast:
Posted on Reply
#23
cheesy999
by: gumpty
Frequency bump = overclock; regardless of whether it stays within the TDP or not. You don't get to define what an overclock is and isn't.
an overclock is operating a part outside the manufacturer rated frequency, if the manufacture is making it do these frequency its not an overclock, just an upclock
Overclocking is the process of running a computer component at a higher clock rate (more clock cycles per second) than it was designed for or was specified by the manufacturer
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overclocking

its not running it at a higher clock speed then it was designed or specified for as the manufacture designed and specified these to go up to 1ghz higher on demand

its less of an overclock, more just 'speed-step' and 'cool and quiet' in reverse (clock speed and voltage increase instead of decrease)

AS you said GUMPTY, we don't get to define a word, but we don't need to, as its already been done
Posted on Reply
#24
gumpty
by: cheesy999
an overclock is operating a part outside the manufacturer rated frequency, if the manufacture is making it do these frequency its not an overclock, just an upclock



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overclocking

its not running it at a higher clock speed then it was designed or specified for as the manufacture designed and specified these to go up to 1ghz higher on demand

its less of an overclock, more just 'speed-step' and 'cool and quiet' in reverse (clock speed and voltage increase instead of decrease)

AS you said GUMPTY, we don't get to define a word, but we don't need to, as its already been done
Yeah, quite right. But surely TDP is irrelevant to the bounds of a theoretical overclock, which I thought was what Redzo was insinuating.
Posted on Reply
#25
Bo$$
Lab Extraordinaire
well the definition of overclocking came about before this turbo boost, so it is opinion whether it is or not, i agree with GUMPTY, freq bump = overclocking

for instance if i set all the cores at the 'turbo boost' frequency 24/7 does that still count as overclocking, yes! because the stock speed is not what the manufacturer intended even though it does this speed by itself!
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment