Thursday, June 16th 2011

Antec Launches Soundscience Halo 6 LED Bias Lighting Kit

In its 25th anniversary year, Antec Inc., the global leader in high-performance computer components and accessories for the gaming, PC upgrade and Do-It-Yourself markets, today announced the availability in the European markets of the soundscience halo 6 LED bias lighting kit. The halo 6 LED bias lighting kit is an affordable option for outfitting PC monitors with professional-grade backlighting. This helps reduce eye fatigue and increase image clarity during long gaming sessions and similar periods of extended computer use.

The bias lighting illumination technique adds a ring of white backlight to PC monitors, reducing eyestrain caused by differences in picture brightness from scene changes in movies, TV shows and video games. The soundscience halo 6 LED bias lighting kit’s USB-powered LED strip (14.6” / 370 mm in length) attaches to the back of the monitor and complements any PC monitor up to 24”. The color and brightness of the LEDs are carefully calibrated and help increase a monitor’s perceived contrast ratio – enhancing perceived black levels, vibrant colors and picture detail by enabling dark adapted viewing.

“The practice of video bias lighting has been used for years by professionals and end-users who understand what’s required for optimal picture quality and viewing comfort,” said Frank Lee, director of the soundscience business unit. “The soundscience halo 6 LED bias lighting kit offers the benefits of reduced eye strain and viewing fatigue, eliminated image contamination due to glare from conventional room lighting, at a very attractive price point – making it an affordable option for a wide range of users.”

The halo 6 LED bias lighting kit is backed by Antec’s Quality 2 year (AQ2) limited warranty on parts and labor and is available now for £ 9.99 MSRP through major retailers, e-tailers and distributors.
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23 Comments on Antec Launches Soundscience Halo 6 LED Bias Lighting Kit

#1
983264
Now this is something new I've seen... Nice for rig shows...
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#2
gumpty
I've been keen to get something like this. Be nice if they had different colours though.
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#3
freaksavior
To infinity ... and beyond!
yay lights.
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#4
RejZoR
This is nothing new as far as concept goes. Philips is using Ambilight on their LCD TV's for ages. We've been using CCFL light behind our TV for years. And i've been using LED lighting to light up the wall where i have my LCD monitor mounted. In the same room i'm also using LED tape on my drawer which is illuminating my white ceiling which is then dispersing the light through the entire room.
LED's are great, they are just a bit expensive. But they are worth it. Especially since i got most of my for free hihihi.
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#5
Mistral
So, this makes your monitor a LED screen?
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#6
BraveSoul
nice ,,not expensive ,, i am puzzled how exactly "color and brightness of the LEDs are carefully calibrated"
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#7
BumbleBee
by: gumpty
I've been keen to get something like this. Be nice if they had different colours though.
NTSC standard for a white signal is D6500K. changing the color temperature won't work.
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#8
Bo$$
Lab Extraordinaire
when is it coming to the UK?
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#9
theJesus
I'm not quite sure I understand how exactly this works . . .
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#11
hanzi
I'm not quite sure I understand how exactly this works . . .
Basically just for viewing comfort, especially when you always turn off the lights(of your room) at night. Less strenuous for the eyes
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#12
streetfighter 2
I'm not sure how well this solution performs but here's an explanation of the general principle with references:
http://www.cinemaquestinc.com/blb.htm
What are the proven benefits of correctly implemented bias lighting?

1. Reduces or eliminates eye strain and viewing fatigue in dark viewing conditions.
2. Eliminates image contamination due to reflections, haze and glare on the screen from conventional room lighting.
3. Enhances perceived black levels, contrast ratio, and picture detail by enabling dark adapted viewing.
4. Preserves correct color perception of the video image by the viewer.
5. Prolongs monitor phosphor life by enabling dark room viewing and lowering of screen brightness requirements (phosphors are used in CRTs, plasmas, and LCDs with CCF or white LED back lighting).
6. Provides a low level of illumination in the room for movement and peripheral activities.
Also, going by the ricer example, it adds horsepower :D.
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#13
BumbleBee
your television displays the best picture in a dark room because there is no light on the screen and colors appear brighter and black levels appear deeper. the problem is after a period of time your eyes start to strain and you lose focus and get 'tunnel vision' because they can't separate the television from the wall anymore, so putting a light source behind the television that matches the level of white the television is projecting prevents this.



if the color temperature of the light source is lower than D6500K it will be red, if it's higher it will be blue and it won't work. it has to be white (D6500K).
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#14
theJesus
Hmm, I don't really have a problem with viewing fatigue, but I'm definitely interested in the improved image quality.
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#15
BumbleBee
if your monitor or television isn't close to a wall it won't work either. you need a wall to create a halo like this.

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#16
theJesus
Ah, well then it's of no use to me :(
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#17
RejZoR
by: Mistral
So, this makes your monitor a LED screen?
Not really. To have a LED LCD you need actual LED's to be positioned behind the LCD matrix.
What this makes my monitor is a CCFL LCD monitor with a LED illuminated back. Sort of fake Ambilight if you want it that way. It just doesn't adapt to the image movement. Which could in theory be done with adapter that would go between graphic card and the LCD screen which would read the image output, screen the edges, average them and colorize the LED tape around the screen accordingly. Even with a bit of delay, it would look nice. But i think the reason why no one makes this is because Philips holds the exclusive patent for it. Aproach is very different but the end result is the same and i'm sure Philips lawyers would go storming through such products very quickly.
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#18
gumpty
by: BumbleBee
your television displays the best picture in a dark room because there is no light on the screen and colors appear brighter and black levels appear deeper. the problem is after a period of time your eyes start to strain and you lose focus and get 'tunnel vision' because they can't separate the television from the wall anymore, so putting a light source behind the television that matches the level of white the television is projecting prevents this.


if the color temperature of the light source is lower than D6500K it will be red, if it's higher it will be blue and it won't work. it has to be white (D6500K).
Good to know. I use daylight bulbs anyway, so these might be a decent addition.
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#19
BumbleBee
this product is going to attract home theater enthusiast because the LED strip is USB powered. the problem with using a light bulb or fluorescent tube is you have to manually turn it on but with this LED strip you can power your TV and LED strip at the same time.

3 or 4 of these LED strips might cost the same as a florescent tube but they consume less power, easier to mount and you can control the size and intensity of the halo.

http://www.thinkcomputers.org/antec-soundscience-bias-halo-6-led-lighting-kit-review/
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#20
popswala
I like the idea of this and looks pretty sweet. It won't work for me at the moment though since my screen is not at a wall at the moment. That won't stop me from getting one though. Other colors would be nice but not for what its intended for. Just for ambiance imo.
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#21
micropage7
by: theJesus
Ah, well then it's of no use to me :(
yeah it just giving you glowing effect like its name
btw it looks cool if it applied under casing and it will glow from there :cool:
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#22
timta2
I've been doing a similar thing for years with a desk lap and low wattage bulb sitting directly behind my monitor as the only light source. I have always thought the halo of light helped. I'm going to have check these out.
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#23
[H]@RD5TUFF
I could see myself using this, as I play in the dark to save on my electricity bill, because of the stupid high prices in California!
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