Thursday, August 11th 2011

AMD Contemplates Bundled Water-Cooling for Some FX-Series Processors

The certified fan-heatsink that comes with the CPU is perhaps the first thing enthusiasts get rid of, from their machines. The bundled heatsinks are almost never built in a way that allows you to squeeze the most out of your CPU. It looks like AMD is deciding whether to change this notion with some of its top-tier 8-core "Bulldozer" FX-series processors. The company reportedly plans to bundle self-contained liquid-based coolers with their processors.

Over the last couple of years, consumers have taken a liking for $100 self-contained CPU water coolers, kits that include the block with a motor, pre-fitted tubing to the radiator, which latches onto the common 120 mm rear fan hole of most cases. Bundling water coolers indicate two things: firstly, that the top-end FX-series chips will be hot, secondly, AMD is trying to woo enthusiasts. AMD could have asked its cooler OEMs to come up with a heavy tower-type fan-heatsink, but it chose water-cooling instead. So the move to pack water-cooling could either work for AMD's image (wooing enthusiasts), or against it (to convey that FX chips are so hot that nothing short of water-cooling is fit for them). Pictured below is a popular self-contained water-cooler by Corsair.

Source: X-bit Labs
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100 Comments on AMD Contemplates Bundled Water-Cooling for Some FX-Series Processors

#1
arterius2
This is fine as long as I don't see a $100 jump in price.
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#2
n-ster
if only on the flagship models, this makes sense
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#3
cheesy999
if this is included in the price or with only a small bump, i can see people choosing these even if sandy/ivy bridge performs better
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#4
NC37
So that means it runs too hot for them to be able to cool them via a cheap crap cooler. So instead of losing more money on better coolers, they recognized their target audience likely uses water cooling. So...slap in a cheap water cooler and make everyone happy. Plus you get a sales pitch with that. Highly doubt they'll run too hot to be able to be cooled on air alone.
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#5
cheesy999
by: NC37
So that means it runs too hot for them to be able to cool them via a cheap crap cooler. So instead of losing more money on better coolers, they recognized their target audience likely uses water cooling. So...slap in a cheap water cooler and make everyone happy. Plus you get a sales pitch with that. Highly doubt they'll run too hot to be able to be cooled on air alone.
The TDP on the high ends is 150W isn't it?

Were you expecting the stock cooler to work on that?

Also remember AMD's current stock cooler is really bad compared to intel's
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#6
burtram
I'd totally buy one, and use the water cooler for my HTPC.
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#7
erocker
by: cheesy999
The TDP on the high ends is 150W isn't it?

Were you expecting the stock cooler to work on that?

Also remember AMD's current stock cooler is really bad compared to intel's
The all aluminum Intel "puck" cooler no. The aluminum and copper "puck" cooler yes. I'm not sure what Intel is using currently. AMD's are thermally different from Intel as well, not sure about Bulldozer though.
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#8
CDdude55
Crazy 4 TPU!!!
That's awesome!

They should manufacture the flagship models with the closed loop water cooling kits and have a second SKU without it for those that don't want to spend extra just for the cooler.
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#9
faramir
Unlikely to be as good as it sounds

As mentioned on another website this is probably going to be one of those crappy low-cost systems that are already on the market with 1500-2000 rpm fan. They're just trying to hop on the "liquid cooling" gimmick bandwagon ...

Why not bundle new CPUs with high quality air cooler with identical, yet lower rpm fan instead ? Sub-1300 rpm should be doable so less noise at the same cost.
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#10
ensabrenoir
Really great idea but don't want to hear anything about bd or fx execpt AVAILABLE NOW
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#11
seronx
Not going to happen for the models coming out, it's going to be pretty hard fitting those in those tin boxes

I can see this happening if they are going to sell TWKR models for $1000
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#12
repman244
by: cheesy999
The TDP on the high ends is 150W isn't it?
125W if we can trust the info we have.
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#13
seronx
by: repman244
125W if we can trust the info we have.
It's actually below 125W TDP

Turbo Core 2.0 works to 125 TDP

so if you turn off Turbo Core you will never hit the 125W TDP
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#14
Hotobu
I wish that they'd just give us the option to buy processors without heatsinks.
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#15
Jstn7477
I almost thought some naughty admin deleted my post, but then realized that a new thread opened up. :roll:

Anyway, I have mixed feelings about an LCS being included instead of a fan. Not all cases have 120mm fan grilles (mATX build anyone?) and if the thing blows up or leaks, it will be taking out hardware most likely. Anyone remember the Tom's Hardware videos of heatsinks being removed from PIII (370) and Athlon (462) systems while playing the game? The Pentiums always downclocked and saved themselves, while the AMD processors went until they caught on fire and died. I even lost one core of a skt. 939 Athlon X2 due to an improperly installed heatsink, so I hope AMD has some better protective measures nowadays.

by: Hotobu
I wish that they'd just give us the option to buy processors without heatsinks.
Then someone might come along and say "My 8310P doesn't need a HSF since it didn't come with one" but who knows. Even if you give someone a HSF, it's not guaranteed that they'll use it, as in the case of some guy buying an i7 975X and using it a week before his new system died, wondering what that burning smell was, and that he maybe should have used the included fan. :shadedshu
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#16
jpierce55
It looks like AMD is testing the waters everyplace they can.
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#17
Casecutter
Meh, considering coolers like the Antec KUHLER H2O 620, or similar Corsair CWCH60 aren’t enough to provide real strong over-clocking, it’s an expensive gimmick that’s only going to suffice like stock heat-pipe (H-P) coolers not much different than those included with a 965 do today. More often at idle such water coolers are good and quite, though at load the first iterations could provide a ruckus. While todays versions are better there's only so many BTU's that can be effectivly transfered by mean of such 120mm type radiators and reasonable air movement.

What’s interesting is that can AMD even consider this as a cost vs. market value, if their cost is say 30% higher than a current H-P cooler cost them to include. How cheap are Water-cooler to produce?

Me I say stop adding coolers, just make sure it positively will shut-down at a controlled temperature, like they already do. Before damage and say no warranty if you really fry it. No different than it is right now if you’re an idiot and run it without or insufficient cooling how does AMD deal with that. Leave responsibility on user to choose the right cooler for their particular application and just have a list of authorized coolers. We’re all big boys; I rather have the option and not pay more for something I don’t intend to use.
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#18
Hayder_Master
Extra money for a cooler only enough for stock speed and turbo boost and not useful for high overclocking, it will big waste.
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#19
jpierce55
by: Hayder_Master
Extra money for a cooler only enough for stock speed and turbo boost and not useful for high overclocking, it will big waste.
It is all gimmick, if not they would just have an option for an incredible air cooler.
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#20
CDdude55
Crazy 4 TPU!!!
by: Jstn7477
I almost thought some naughty admin deleted my post, but then realized that a new thread opened up. :roll:

Anyway, I have mixed feelings about an LCS being included instead of a fan. Not all cases have 120mm fan grilles (mATX build anyone?) and if the thing blows up or leaks, it will be taking out hardware most likely.
A lot of mATX cases still generally have a single 120mm fan mount at the front, you can just throw the radiator there(unless the rad is to thick).

Closed loop water coolers tends to be much safer then custom water cooling so i wouldn't worry much about something going wrong, then again we really haven't seen AMD's closed loop cooler(assuming they actually go through with it), so it's hard to tell. But from the perspective of seeing Corsairs closed loop water coolers, i wouldn't worry, they're strong.
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#21
xBruce88x
by: Hayder_Master
Extra money for a cooler only enough for stock speed and turbo boost and not useful for high overclocking, it will big waste.
well we don't know any performance specs of the water cooler they had in mind, the one pictured is just an example. sounds like a cool idea though (no pun intended)

i'm guessing corsair or asetek
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#22
fullinfusion
1.21 Gigawatts
Thats cool to hear but they have some big boots to fill if they plan on taking on Corsair's self contained water solution.
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#23
LAN_deRf_HA
All they'd do is use a proven asetek or coolit with an AMD logo. Wouldn't have anything to do with corsair.
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#24
Ravenas
Looks like AMD has found the fastest way to receive negative publicity. Bundle a water cooler with a processor so every joe shmuck can fry their computer and then complain about horrible warranties and faulty tech support.

Bad idea in my opinion... :laugh:
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#25
Halk
by: fullinfusion
Thats cool to hear but they have some big boots to fill if they plan on taking on Corsair's self contained water solution.
Corsair just get someone else to make it, same people as make it for Asus. Likely AMD would go to the same place and get theirs.

Personally I don't like it because those water coolers aren't as good as high end air, or as quiet or as cheap.
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