Monday, August 22nd 2011

iiyama Intros ProLite VA full-HD Monitors

Japanese display technology major iiyama a couple of new ProLite full-HD LED-backlit LCD monitors, the 24-inch XB2472HD-B, and the 27-inch X2775HDS-B. The two use vertical alignment (VA) panel technology, that enables good viewing angles both horizontally and vertically (i.e. when the panel is oriented in landscape and portrait modes), with viewing angles of 178°. The two boast of 5 million to 1 dynamic contrast, and 1,000:1 static contrast ratios. The XB2472HD-B features a stand which has a telescopic arm, that allows easy height adjustment, to make room for the panel to rotate into portrait mode. The X2775HDS-B features a 4-port USB 2.0 hub. Both models take display input from DVI and HDMI.

Source: iiyama
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9 Comments on iiyama Intros ProLite VA full-HD Monitors

#1
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
They talk about full HD like it's a feature.
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#2
arterius2
They talk about full HD like how Apple talks about front-facing camera as a feature.

im just curious, for 24 and 27 inch monitors (especially the 27), reasonably speaking, can the resolution be anything less than a "Full-HD"? this seems ridiculous as "full-hd" is the lowest resolution for desktop monitors these days.

P.S my 15" laptop screen is "full-hd"
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#3
AsRock
TPU addict
I think there just trying to get the point across that all ports can do the highest resolution in HD.

Although i thought it was more of a issue a few years ago with HDTV's and not monitors.
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#4
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
Added a poll.
Posted on Reply
#5
Widjaja
Once one company makes a move to go above 1080p at an affordable price the rest will follow.

But who knows there maybe some conspiracy going on and all the corporation agree to the current HD of 1080p so everyone can make money.
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#6
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: Widjaja
Once one company makes a move to go above 1080p at an affordable price the rest will follow.
At one point, iiyama itself decided to do that. iiyama then appeared to be anti-cartel and anti-16:9, and at one point claimed that it will make 27-inch 2560x1600 monitors for the masses (read under $400, prices at which 27-inch 1080p monitors are sold).

by: Widjaja
But who knows there maybe some conspiracy going on and all the corporation agree to the current HD of 1080p so everyone can make money.
Cartels very much do exist in the display industry, which decide the most common resolution, the most-prevalent panel technology, and even most-prevalent input standard. Another argument is that when the industry sticks to standards, the cheaper it is to make and source parts.

At the moment, 1366x768 is shoved into the consumers as the most prevalent notebook resolution (irrespective of what's the notebook panel size), and 1600x900 and 1920x1080 as "value" and "mainstream" desktop display resolutions. The only "high-end" is the same 1920x1080 at bigger panel dimensions. The four-figure prices of 2560x1600 and 2560x1440 panels are a natural barrier for defining the standard. Those resolutions are only available for those willing to shell out that much.
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#7
Completely Bonkers
Visual elements of common software HAVE ALWAYS BEEN limited at 1080p (FIXED).

Interesting info bta about iiyama. If they did launch 27-inch 2560x1600 then I'd be the first to buy. This is a sweet spot IMO for any enthusiast or workstation user.
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#8
scaminatrix
by: Frick
They talk about full HD like it's a feature.
So there's no difference between HD Ready and Full HD?

"Full HD" is only mentioned once in the description, and you've got to mention it to distinguish it from HD Ready. A lot of people get confused between Full HD and HD Ready over here and end up buying a HD Ready TV because they're cheaper (so they think they're getting a good deal). Consumers can be idiots :rolleyes: gotta account for them.
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#9
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: scaminatrix
So there's no difference between HD Ready and Full HD?

"Full HD" is only mentioned once in the description, and you've got to mention it to distinguish it from HD Ready. A lot of people get confused between Full HD and HD Ready over here and end up buying a HD Ready TV because they're cheaper (so they think they're getting a good deal). Consumers can be idiots :rolleyes: gotta account for them.
For TV's it might be good and all, but for computer monitors above 22"? Not so much.
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