Thursday, September 22nd 2011

I-O Data Intros BDXL-Capable Portable Blu-ray Burner

Japanese company I-O Data unveiled its latest portable Blu-ray drive, the BRP-U6XE, which is capable of writing the new BDXL format, with disc capacities of up to 100 GB. Measuring 137 x 154 x 20 mm, the drive relies entirely on USB 2.0 for its connectivity. Its USB cable is built into it, and is retractable. Corel WinDVD BD3D and Nero Express Essentials come bundled.

The drive is capable of burning single and double layer BD-R discs at 6X, triple and quadruple layer (BDXL) BD-R discs at 4X, BD-RE at 2X, DVD-R/+R and DVD+RW at 8X, DVD-R/+R double-layer and DVD-RW at 6X, DVD-RAM at 5X, CD-R at 24X, and CD-RW at 16X. Backed by a one-year warranty, the I-O Data BRP-U6XE is priced at about $233.

Source: TechConnect Magazine
Add your own comment

8 Comments on I-O Data Intros BDXL-Capable Portable Blu-ray Burner

#1
Redline582
Talk about a bottleneck

Writing up to 100GB and running it through only USB 2.0? Bad call in my book.
Posted on Reply
#2
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: Redline582
Writing up to 100GB and running it through only USB 2.0? Bad call in my book.
There's absolutely no optical drive that can get bottlenecked by USB 2.0. Because no optical disc standard has reached USB 2.0 bandwidth. The fastest optical disc is BD-R 12X, but even that is 432 Mbps.

This drive burns BDXL at 4X. Blu-ray transfer rate at 4X speed is 144 Mbps. USB 2.0 bandwidth is 480 Mbps.

So even if this drive used Thunderbolt, its speed would have been the same.
Posted on Reply
#3
Redline582
My mistake, I missed the 4x for BDXL. Please correct me if I'm wrong, but USB never reaches it its theoretical transfer speed. The average seems to range around the mid 20's in MB/s.
Posted on Reply
#4
NickVs
by: btarunr
There's absolutely no optical drive that can get bottlenecked by USB 2.0. Because no optical disc standard has reached USB 2.0 bandwidth. The fastest optical disc is BD-R 12X, but even that is 432 Mbps.

This drive burns BDXL at 4X. Blu-ray transfer rate at 4X speed is 144 Mbps. USB 2.0 bandwidth is 480 Mbps.

So even if this drive used Thunderbolt, its speed would have been the same.
Technically, USB 2.0 barely exceeds 50% of its theoretical bandwidth of 480 Mbps, best results I've seen are about 40 MB/s (320 Mbps) and it's still really hard to achive, so BD-R 12X would require something better than that, like USB 3.0 for instance, especially considering power requirements of a full speed BD-R.
Posted on Reply
#5
[H]@RD5TUFF
A lot of new laptops come with USB 3, why no USB 3 . . .. . ?
Posted on Reply
#6
dr emulator (madmax)
100gb discs

but saddly 1 tiny scratch and it's :nutkick: and :banghead: time :shadedshu

and what of the price of these multi-layered discs ? i bet they will be astronomical in price, and that i'll need a mortgage to buy 1 :twitch:
Posted on Reply
#7
[H]@RD5TUFF
by: dr emulator (madmax)
100gb discs

but saddly 1 tiny scratch and it's :nutkick: and :banghead: time :shadedshu

and what of the price of these multi-layered discs ? i bet they will be astronomical in price, and that i'll need a mortgage to buy 1 :twitch:
Yeah last time I looked at dual layer bluray it was about $14 -$24 each which is insane!
Posted on Reply
#8
Thefumigator
by: [H]@RD5TUFF
Yeah last time I looked at dual layer bluray it was about $14 -$24 each which is insane!
I own a rewritable 50GB bluray disc, I think it was 15$. And its rewritable, so its better than a pendrive in my case, backup purposes. Of course I also own it for the sake of owning one.

What I found surprising is how slow it is recorded. i mean, I started the burn let's say 3pm and when I came back at 6pm the thing was still burning
Posted on Reply