Monday, September 26th 2011

A-Data Announces New S510 Series SATA 6 Gbps SSDs

ADATA Technology, a leading manufacturer of high-performance DRAM modules and NAND Flash application products, today announced the release of the S510 Solid State Drive (SSD), a mid-range version of the company’s flagship S511. Implementing the SATA III (6Gb/sec) specification, the S510 is aimed at the growing pool of users who recognize the cost and performance advantages of solid state drive upgrades for both desktop and portable computers.

The performance advantages of the SATA III transfer specification are becoming well-known among consumers, and the S510 capitalizes on this trend with native support through adoption of the SandForce SF-2200 series chip. Its read and write speeds are twice that of SSDs using the older SATA II specification, and in real world test simulations reached 550/510MB read and write speeds respectively, with 4K random write speeds as high as 85,000 IOPS.

Outside of the new computer market, SSDs are increasingly seen as a cost-effective option for upgrading existing laptop and notebook computers, as these systems often benefit more in terms of boot speed and application performance over comparable desktop systems. Additionally, laptop and notebook users are more likely to need the low heat and high impact resistance of solid state storage. By replacing the mechanical drive with an SSD, the useful life of the laptop or notebook can be extended.

The S510 will be available in 120GB capacities.
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8 Comments on A-Data Announces New S510 Series SATA 6 Gbps SSDs

#1
ensabrenoir
Using an adata now. No problems lives up to its claims. Could never update though. Good entry level ssd didn't see a price mentioned though or I over looked it.
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#2
Jegergrim
Why Sandforce 2200 controller...? :(
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#3
happita
by: Jegergrim
Why Sandforce 2200 controller...? :(
There are about 4 controllers out there on the market:
Sandforce's controller
Crucial's controller
Marvell's controller
Intel's controller

Both Intel and Crucial use their own and will not share. So we are left with either Marvell-based SSD controllers or Sandforce-based SSD controllers. Seeing as Sandforce is the faster one, the people that right off the bat drool at the numbers and click the 'buy' button without caring about what other GOOD SSDs are out there, other competitors can't compete against them without price drops and good stability. Something Sandforce or either the companies like ocz, mushkin, etc. who need to work on the firmware for this stability.
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#4
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: happita
There are about 5 controllers out there on the market:
Sandforce's controller
Crucial's controller
Marvell's controller
Intel's controller
JMicron and its various re-brands (such as Toshiba)
OCZ-Indilinx
Phison
FTFY. Intel and Crucial have no controllers of their own. They use Marvell controllers. They only provide the NAND flash (Micron in case of Crucial) and sometimes cache DRAM chips (again, Micron in case of Crucial, Hyundai/Hynix in case of Intel).
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#5
WarraWarra
This is so close to the samsung 8** ssd series release, would be nice if it is a re-branded Samsung 8** with more user friendly performance.
Does not look like it is the same size as samsung 8** SSD .
The Intel numbering 510 looks 8mb bug scary.

Any idea on stability is it same or better than OCZ ?

Wondering if ADATA tested using the intel *30/31 chipset driver that fixes the transfer rate issues or the older defective driver like anandtech did on the samsung 8** test.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/4863/the-samsung-ssd-830-review
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#6
[H]@RD5TUFF
Wonder what pricing will be, I hate press releases without pricing! :banghead:
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#7
Jegergrim
I think its about time Sandforce 22xx controller gets fixed though, it for instance keeps me from ever buying one at this very moment, I bet many feel the same way, I don't mind some performance loss over reliability/stability
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#8
iLLz
by: btarunr
FTFY. Intel and Crucial have no controllers of their own. They use Marvell controllers. They only provide the NAND flash (Micron in case of Crucial) and sometimes cache DRAM chips (again, Micron in case of Crucial, Hyundai/Hynix in case of Intel).
I thought Intel did have their own controller, just not one for the 6Gbps drives. I thought it was those drives that utilized Marvell controllers. Also Samsung has their own controller as well. It is not available to anyone else as far as I know, but Samsung is one of the few if not the only drive maker to make all components (Flash, Controller, etc.)
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