Tuesday, October 11th 2011

Patriot Memory Announces New Second Gen Pyro SE SSD

Patriot Memory, a global pioneer in high-performance memory, NAND flash, storage, and enthusiast computer products, today expanded their Pyro brand of SATA III solid-state drives with the launch of its new Pyro SE. Powered by SandForce’s SF-2281 SSD processor, the Patriot Memory Pyro SE brings the added performance of synchronous NAND to the brand while offering a very aggressive price per performance ratio.

To ensure rock-solid performance, the Patriot Memory Pyro SE utilizes TRIM, DuraClass, and DuraWrite technologies. Offering read/write speeds of 500+ MB/s, the Pyro SE will chew through large file transfers and make even the most demanding applications a smooth experience. The Pyro SE series will feature a standard 2.5-inch form factor for flexible compatibility with both notebooks and desktops.

The Patriot Memory Pyro SE will offer increased performance while still maintaining our aggressive pricing strategy”, says William Lai, Patriot Memory’s Product Manager. “The Patriot Memory Pyro SE will be the ultimate choice for performance users looking to increase productivity while not bankrupting their budget.”

General details
  • 120 GB and 240 GB capacities
  • SandForce SF-2281 SSD processor
  • SATA 6.0 Gbps interface
  • Up to 550MB/s sequential read speeds
  • Up to 520MB/s sequential write speeds
  • Maximum 4K random write: 85,000 IOPS
  • TRIM Support
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9 Comments on Patriot Memory Announces New Second Gen Pyro SE SSD

#1
Breathless
“The Patriot Memory Pyro SE will be the ultimate choice for performance users looking to increase productivity while not bankrupting their budget.”

Price or it didn't happen
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#2
STCNE
So, where does the sync NAND actually have any performance benefits over the async. Say that I was playing a game with a very high def texture pack that bogs down a mechanical drive, Fallout NV with the MNC pack and some SSAA to be precise, would there be any benefit getting sync or toggle NAND?
Posted on Reply
#3
TheLostSwede
by: STCNE
So, where does the sync NAND actually have any performance benefits over the async. Say that I was playing a game with a very high def texture pack that bogs down a mechanical drive, Fallout NV with the MNC pack and some SSAA to be precise, would there be any benefit getting sync or toggle NAND?
Have a look here http://www.anandtech.com/show/4604/the-sandforce-roundup-corsair-patriot-ocz-owc-memoright-ssds-compared/3
Should give you an idea of the performance difference at least.
Posted on Reply
#4
[H]@RD5TUFF
I wonder if they have fixed the horrible random death issue their drives seem to suffer from across the board.
Posted on Reply
#5
don1970
by: [H]@RD5TUFF
I wonder if they have fixed the horrible random death issue their drives seem to suffer from across the board.
Nope. If you buy a drive based on a SandForce controller, you have not been paying much attention lately or your data is not very important to you (or system stability...take your pick). The name of the game for reliability right now is Samsung, Intel, and Crucial (and in that order). The Samsung uses their own proprietary controller where the latest Crucial and Intel SSDs are using Marvell.
Posted on Reply
#6
dr emulator (madmax)
by: don1970
Nope. If you buy a drive based on a SandForce controller, you have not been paying much attention lately or your data is not very important to you (or system stability...take your pick). The name of the game for reliability right now is Samsung, Intel, and Crucial (and in that order). The Samsung uses their own proprietary controller where the latest Crucial and Intel SSDs are using Marvell.
you're post interests me, any source on your quote?
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#7
don1970
by: dr emulator (madmax)
you're post interests me, any source on your quote?
Two articles posted by AnandTech:

http://www.anandtech.com/show/4604/the-sandforce-roundup-corsair-patriot-ocz-owc-memoright-ssds-compared

and http://www.anandtech.com/show/4863/the-samsung-ssd-830-review

Plus hundreds of NewEgg reviews, and numerous other end user product reviews at tech sites I have been combing through for the last two months trying to determine what SATA III drive is safe to buy.
Posted on Reply
#8
dr emulator (madmax)
thanks i'll read through them soon
i was going to get a 120gb wildfire but had my doubts, plus i'm not sure if it would work properly on my x58 ud7 motherboard:twitch:,

:ohwell: no worries i'm in no hurry to get something that won't last long or store things properly,

my usual hard drives (western digital caviar black 6gb/s) are ok (if a little bit noisy :laugh::D) :toast:
Posted on Reply
#9
don1970
by: dr emulator (madmax)
thanks i'll read through them soon
i was going to get a 120gb wildfire but had my doubts, plus i'm not sure if it would work properly on my x58 ud7 motherboard:twitch:,

:ohwell: no worries i'm in no hurry to get something that won't last long or store things properly,

my usual hard drives (western digital caviar black 6gb/s) are ok (if a little bit noisy :laugh::D) :toast:
You are welcome for the thanks! :toast:

Buying a SSD today is pretty risky unless you have done a LOT of research. I say risky because of the expense of these devices and the rather unacceptable failure/stability issues that have been seen especially with SandForce based drives. Honestly speaking, after reading through the material I have seen I nearly forwent the idea of an SSD....but the three brands I mentioned seem to be a more measured and acceptable risk.

I will personally be using a Crucial M4 128GB SSD with a Seagate Barracuda 7200.12 as storage. Unless there is a great deal on the Samsung 8 series SSD (their first SATA III SSD) which is due out this month, which in that case I MIGHT go that direction but I am leery of the fact it will be brand new to the market even given it has been reviewed already.

My motherboard is an Intel BOXDZ68DB, so I won't be able to blame the motherboard for any SSD weirdness I might encounter. Intel is very good about product validation. I modified my build strategy to mitigate as much risk as possible. The motherboard in question will be the basis of a gaming rig with a Radeon 6970 and i5-2500K and since I do not overclock I consider my decision to be sound.

I have been building PCs since 1989 (geez, just dated myself) so I am extremely careful about research and component selection. OCD careful. Which pays off.

Glad I could be of help.:)
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