Thursday, December 1st 2011

Ivy Bridge Official Benchmarks – Markedly Better Performance Than Sandy Bridge

Previous preliminary reports have suggested that the forthcoming Ivy Bridge CPUs will have single threaded performance on par with the existing Sandy Bridge CPUs and will mainly deliver improvements to power consumption and integrated graphics - nothing for PC enthusiasts to get excited about. However, in leaked documents sent to partners, Intel have now revealed official performance figures for IB and they look rather good. They've produced a raft of benchmarks, which reveal improvements such as 56% in ArcSoft Media Expresso, 25% in Excel 2010 and a 199% gain in the 3D Mark Vantage GPU benchmark. Unfortunately, they haven't released any benchmarks based on high performance 3D games, but it's probably safe to say that they will be similarly improved. Now, on to the benchmarks, which compare their new 3.4 GHz i7-3770 (4 cores + HT) with the current 3.4 GHz i7-2600, also with 4 cores + HT:


  • +7% higher overall SYSmark 2012 score
  • +14% higher overall HDXPRT 2011 score
  • +15% higher Cinebench 11.5 score
  • +13% better ProShow Gold 4.5 result
  • +25% faster performance in Excel 2010
  • +56% faster performance in ArcSoft Media Expresso
  • +192% higher overall 3DMark Vantage score
  • +17% faster performance in 3DMark Vantage CPU benchmark
  • +199% faster performance in 3DMark Vantage GPU benchmark

The key architectural enhancements delivering these improvements are:
  • Intel's new 22nm 3D Tri-Gate technology. More on this here
  • Enhanced AVX acceleration
  • IGP performance improved by 30% compared to its predecessor
  • IGP supports DX11 and OpenCL 1.1
  • PCI Express 3.0 x16 interface, including a PCI Express 2.0 x4 controller
The new processor range is slated for release in March or April 2012, so if one can wait a few months to upgrade their existing system, then it looks like those few months will be well worth it - especially as they're likely to make for excellent overclockers. It's interesting to note that while Windows 8, due to be released just a few months later, will support the DX11.1 point revision, these new CPUs will not. How much this will matter in real-life applications remains to be seen, however.

Finally, TechPowerUp will keep a lookout for those all-important gaming benchmarks.Source: xbit labs
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66 Comments on Ivy Bridge Official Benchmarks – Markedly Better Performance Than Sandy Bridge

#1
ayban
by: qubit
No, it really is considerably better than HD3000 graphics, if you're interested in an IGP. It also supports DX11, which HD3000 does not.

You might find the following TPU news article interesting: Super-High 4096 x 4096 Display From An IGP? The Upcoming Ivy Bridge Can Do It

Welcome to TPU. :toast:
if this is the actual list of processors i'd say the tables shown was bad.
http://www.techpowerup.com/155826/Intel-Ivy-Bridge-Desktop-Processor-Models-Tabled.html
That's 3.5ghz vs 3.4ghz.

as for the the HD graphics. i only wish they did compared it to HD3000, i was hoping HD4000 probably would perform better than hd5450 and or close to a 9500gt.

:eek: Intel is confusing us.
Posted on Reply
#2
cadaveca
My name is Dave
by: ayban
if this is the actual list of processors i'd say the tables shown was bad.
http://www.techpowerup.com/155826/In...ls-Tabled.html
That's 3.5ghz vs 3.4ghz.
Nothing is wrong. The 2600k is also 3.5 GHz (3.5-3.8 GHz when turbo is enabled), but is a default 3.4 GHz part. Likewise, the 3770K will be 3.4 GHz, with 3.5-3.9GHz Turbo modes, giving the 3770K a 100 MHz boost, but only in single-threaded workloads.
Posted on Reply
#3
ayban
by: cadaveca
Nothing is wrong. The 2600k is also 3.5 GHz (3.5-3.8 GHz when turbo is enabled), but is a default 3.4 GHz part. Likewise, the 3770K will be 3.4 GHz, with 3.5-3.9GHz Turbo modes, giving the 3770K a 100 MHz boost, but only in single-threaded workloads.
nothing is wrong YET, unless it replaces the price point.
Posted on Reply
#4
EpicShweetness
I've been thinking of the IB processors as an upgrade from my I7 920. I understand it uses 53 less watts (more since mines is juiced to 3.0Ghz) and its AVX instruction set makes it faster then Nehalem clock for clock. My real question is would the improvement be drastic enough to warrant an upgrade? For me the fire breathing dragon of a CPU I have, lowering the power consumption by almost half is the most appealing thing.
Posted on Reply
#5
cadaveca
My name is Dave
by: ayban
nothing is wrong YET, unless it replaces the price point.
Yeah, I see what you're saying. You'd think Intel would want to phase out current 1155 CPU when the new Ivy Bridge ones come out, but of course, there's still some stores selling 775 parts for their original cost, so you may be very right in being a bit concerned.

MInd you, if these figures are real, releasing a muc hfaster CPU for the same price is seomthing I have no problems with Intel doing :D More for your dollar is always good!

by: EpicShweetness
I've been thinking of the IB processors as an upgrade from my I7 920. I understand it uses 53 less watts (more since mines is juiced to 3.0Ghz) and its AVX instruction set makes it faster then Nehalem clock for clock. My real question is would the improvement be drastic enough to warrant an upgrade? For me the fire breathing dragon of a CPU I have, lowering the power consumption by almost half is the most appealing thing.
Considering 1155 CPUs clock better than previous parts on average, and cram 1366 tri-channel bandwidth into just two channels, SKT1155 has alot to offer other than just the power consumption side of things. Ivy Bridge is only going ot make that deal even sweeter.
Posted on Reply
#6
makwy2
Yawn... I'll wait until I see some independent tests.
Posted on Reply
#7
Breit
any word on ivy bridge-e? looks like a viable base to build a decent enthusiast platform around... :)
Posted on Reply
#8
radrok
by: Breit
any word on ivy bridge-e? looks like a viable base to build a decent enthusiast platform around... :)
Intel clarified that there will be Ivy-E just after launching SB-E, I am talking without any kind of information backup but LGA2011 could well see a full silicon of SB-E thanks to the 22nm lithography and so we could see an 8c/16t Core i7 LGA2011 the main reason is that they could fit the 130w thermal envelope they couldn't on 32nm
Posted on Reply
#9
Damn_Smooth
I don't think it is worth an upgrade if you already have SB, but I think it is worth a 4 month wait if you haven't bought SB. I guess that's why I'm waiting.
Posted on Reply
#10
3rold
by: newtekie1
Meh... The entire second graph was entirely due to the better GPU, which most of us will never use.

And the first graph was only better because of higher turboboost frequencies.

I'll wait for some real reviews, but I'm guessing performance per clock won't be all that much higher than SB, if higher at all. But the chips will likely clock higher on air, which will be nice...
That's what I think too, IB is just the new shiny version of SB! I don't need to waste mos money in shiny stuff.
Posted on Reply
#11
ensabrenoir
......wow ivy is a die shrink & tune up of sb....not a new arc. Even here people don't get this.
Posted on Reply
#12
Wile E
Power User
Meh, I'll wait for proper reviews. I really don't expect much improvement per clock in cpu tasks.
Posted on Reply
#13
PopcornMachine
Even if these benchmarks are accurate, the real important part that most are ignoring is what will they cost?

Will they be good deals like SB, or overpriced like SB-E?
Posted on Reply
#14
cadaveca
My name is Dave
by: Wile E
Meh, I'll wait for proper reviews. I really don't expect much improvement per clock in cpu tasks.
Neither am I. It's the power consumption drop and faster IGP that really interests me. I don't even expect more overclocks, but the SB IGP is a bit too weak for my liking right now. I'd love to use SB for HTPC without having to use an add-in card.
Posted on Reply
#15
Wile E
Power User
by: cadaveca
Neither am I. It's the power consumption drop and faster IGP that really interests me. I don't even expect more overclocks, but the SB IGP is a bit too weak for my liking right now. I'd love to use SB for HTPC without having to use an add-in card.
SB is still plenty for HTPC. You don't need acceleration for video. All you need is the ability to display in your chosen resolution. In fact, cpu decoding is normally more accurate, and with he new 10bit encoding gaining popularity, acceleration doesn't work anyway. Acceleration is highly overrated with cpus this powerful.
Posted on Reply
#16
tigger
I'm the only one
P67 supports IB too, not just Z68, my board supported it with bios 902.
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