Friday, February 3rd 2012

Pioneer Readies New Blu-ray XL Burner Capable of Writing at 6X Speed

Pioneer is working on a new Blu-ray disc writer, the BDR-S07, capable of writing 100 GB Blu-ray XL (BDXL) discs at speeds of up to 6X. The drive burns more conventional BD-R double-layer and single-layer discs at speeds up to 12X. BD-R LtH are written at 6X; single, double, and triple-layer BD-RE discs are written at 2X. The drive is built in the conventional tray-loading 5.25" form-factor, supporting the SATA interface. It comes in three variants that differ only with their bezels: BDR-S07-BK has a piano-black bezel, the BDR-S07-KR has a matte-black bezel, and the BDR-S07-W has a matte-white bezel. These drives will be priced at 25,000 JPY (US $328).

Source: AkihabaraNews
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8 Comments on Pioneer Readies New Blu-ray XL Burner Capable of Writing at 6X Speed

#1

I love bluray but it took forever for the prices on writable media to come down. I still can't see buying something like dual layer RE disks. I guess if you really need the space for critical or archival backups it would be better than buying a tape drive, but if you need a cosigner to buy a pack of 25, I'm not sure how much demand there's going to be for the new format.
#2
hhumas
whatever If i get blue-ray rw but blue-ray disc are not available here
Posted on Reply
#3
Wile E
Power User
by: twilyth
I love bluray but it took forever for the prices on writable media to come down. I still can't see buying something like dual layer RE disks. I guess if you really need the space for critical or archival backups it would be better than buying a tape drive, but if you need a cosigner to buy a pack of 25, I'm not sure how much demand there's going to be for the new format.
Yeah, the single layer BDs are the only ones worth buying right now. Cost per GB, they are actually cheaper than DL DVDs.
Posted on Reply
#4
ypsylon
Seriously, I'm really puzzled about optic media being still in existence. I did not burned single CD/DVD (forget about BR) in probably 10 years. Granted if you working in movie studio and (re)mastering material to Blue-Ray then sure you need recorder, but surely if you moving data around or making small backup then any big PenDrive or SSD is better choice than slow and cumbersome optic drive.
Posted on Reply
#5
Wile E
Power User
by: ypsylon
Seriously, I'm really puzzled about optic media being still in existence. I did not burned single CD/DVD (forget about BR) in probably 10 years. Granted if you working in movie studio and (re)mastering material to Blue-Ray then sure you need recorder, but surely if you moving data around or making small backup then any big PenDrive or SSD is better choice than slow and cumbersome optic drive.
It's easier to catalog and organize discs.

But really, I just use them for movies for players that can't handle my video files.
Posted on Reply
#6

I use them for archiving, but I keep reading about how the media might not last 20 years. IDK. Anything that's important to me I keep on multiple backups anyway, so it doesn't really matter.
#7
jaredudu
They said the same thing about CDs though, when they first came out. I have music CDs from as early as 1983 and they still work perfectly.
Posted on Reply
#8

I think commercially produced music cds use a metal foil with pits. Recordable cds weren't available until the early to mid 90's I think. I got one of the first consumer models - the Sony Spressa. Those use a heat sensitive dye, as do recordable DVDs and Bluray. The stability of the dye was supposedly the problem.

I can read cds I burned from 20 years ago still though. Of course since the first ones used CDFS I think, I don't even try to read those. :laugh: :toast: