Friday, February 3rd 2012

AMD Slips Out Trinity ULV 3DMark Performance

In a footnote of a slide detailing AMD's Trinity A6 APU for Ultrathin notebooks at the company's Financial Analyst Day event, the new chip's 3DMark performance was revealed. The company was talking about the 17W ULV (ultra-low voltage) variant of the "Trinity" APU in the slide, that's designed for compact notebooks. The 3DMark Vantage performance of the APU was measured to be 2,355 points, in the same test, an Intel Core i5-2537M ULV 17W "Sandy Bridge" processor scored 1,158 points. The AMD chip, hence, emerged with a 103% graphics performance lead.

The slide notes that with an assumed performance increase of 30% by the upcoming "Ivy Bridge" architecture, its 3DMark performance is projected to be 1,505 points. The 17W Trinity chip would still end up with a 56% performance lead. Moving on, AMD even revealed the performance of the high-performance A10 "Trinity" APU with 25W TDP, designed for slightly thicker notebooks. This chip scored 3,600 points in 3DMark, which would effectively make it 136% faster than Ivy Bridge at graphics.

As for CPU performance, it's noted that Intel will clearly have an edge with performance per core, and the upper hand with single-threaded applications, while Trinity could be competitive with multi-threaded applications, as its two-module/four-core APUs will be competitively priced to Intel's two-core/four-thread(HTT) ones. AMD has pulled the presentation off from the public page of AMD-FAD.Source: VR-Zone
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107 Comments on AMD Slips Out Trinity ULV 3DMark Performance

#1
Wile E
Power User
I don't ever plan to game on an ultra portable, so as long as the integrate graphics can handle outputting to 1920x1200 to my monitor, I don't care. CPU power and battery life is what matters to me in this segment.
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#2
cheesy999
by: btarunr
In a footnote of a slide detailing AMD's Trinity A6 APU for Ultrathin notebooks at the company's Financial Analyst Day event, the new chip's 3DMark performance was revealed. The company was talking about the 17W ULV (ultra-low voltage) variant of the "Trinity" APU in the slide, that's designed for compact notebooks. The 3DMark performance of the APU was measured to be 2,355 points, in the same test, an Intel Core i5-2537M ULV 17W "Sandy Bridge" processor scored 1,158 points. The AMD chip, hence, emerged with a 103% graphics performance lead.

The slide notes that with an assumed performance increase of 30% by the upcoming "Ivy Bridge" architecture, its 3DMark performance is projected to be 1,505 points. The 17W Trinity chip would still end up with a 56% performance lead. Moving on, AMD even revealed the performance of the high-performance A10 "Trinity" APU with 25W TDP, designed for slightly thicker notebooks. This chip scored 3,600 points in 3DMark, which would effectively make it 136% faster than Ivy Bridge at graphics. [---]

As for CPU performance, it's noted that Intel will clearly have an edge with performance per core, and the upper hand and single-threaded applications, while Trinity could be competitive with multi-threaded applications, as its two-module/four-core APUs will be competitively priced to Intel's two-core/four-thread(HTT) ones. AMD has pulled the presentation off from the public page of AMD-FAD.

Source: VR-Zone
You might want to mention that it's 3d Mark Vantage
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#3
RejZoR
You don't have to strictly game on it to utilize GPU. You'd be surprised how many things use GPU these days. Browser, Adobe Flash player, video players (for HD decoding), video and image transcoders, image editors etc etc.
All this utilize GPU power as a general mean of computation.
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#4
Wile E
Power User
I don't use GPU acceleration for any of that. CPU encoding and decoding have better quality, and there is no gpu acceleration for 10bit encodes. The only thing that matters to me is cpu power.
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#5
phanbuey
by: Wile E
I don't use GPU acceleration for any of that. CPU encoding and decoding have better quality, and there is no gpu acceleration for 10bit encodes. The only thing that matters to me is cpu power.
I agree with you, but you are also on the extreme side of the spectrum. You're encoding HD movies to watch on your portable device and you are able to tell quality apart vs GPU encodes. Most people cannot.

Also to credit the post above, more and more software functionality will begin to be taken on by the GPGPU as it is inherently more efficient (read: not necessarily 'better') than CPU at performing certain crunching tasks - so 'general computing' will become more GPU dependent as software evolves.
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#6
Zen_
by: Wile E
I don't ever plan to game on an ultra portable, so as long as the integrate graphics can handle outputting to 1920x1200 to my monitor, I don't care. CPU power and battery life is what matters to me in this segment.
More applications and media are being GPU accelerated though, and it can be more efficient. AMD's UVD works really well, Chrome supports GPU acceleration, flash content can be accelerated, and there's going to be more support down the road.

If AMD can get the manufacturing kinks hammered out and improve power efficiency over Llano there's no doubt in my mind that Trinity will be a home run.
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#7
eidairaman1
by: Zen_
More applications and media are being GPU accelerated though, and it can be more efficient. AMD's UVD works really well, Chrome supports GPU acceleration, flash content can be accelerated, and there's going to be more support down the road.

If AMD can get the manufacturing kinks hammered out and improve power efficiency over Llano there's no doubt in my mind that Trinity will be a home run.
I know most dont care about IE but its fact that the latest utilizes the GPUs today
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#8
Steevo
Hardware accelerated text rendering, last I checked it was still the 90's when that was an issue?

Otherwise, flash, silverlight, and HTML5 is supported almost regardless of browser.

Is a game playable on it, a game that is worth playing? If not, doesn't matter, and then the only things that matter are price.
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#9
15th Warlock
I don't know about you guys, but I really hope Razer offers the option of going with a Trinity core instead of Ivy Bridge for its Fiona gaming tablet, that would make it much more desirable IMO, and give it an edge in graphics rendering.
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#10
TheLaughingMan
by: 15th Warlock
I don't know about you guys, but I really hope Razer offers the option of going with a Trinity core instead of Ivy Bridge for its Fiona gaming tablet, that would make it much more desirable IMO, and give it an edge in graphics rendering.
Most likely they will. It has been clear since LLano that AMD has a distinct advantage in GPU power over Intel. The only hope Intel has for getting that contract over AMD is to get Nvidia to co-sign with them and that is not likely to happen.

Glad to see AMD learns from its mistakes here. Marketing the performance as 2 module/4 core with a comparison to the 2 core/ 4 thread design of Intel. They need to work out GF issues as stated and working on getting performance for Bulldozer Architecture to be consistent which I have said time and time again. Consistence AMD. Being just as good 70% of the time, better 10% of the time, and absolutely destroyed 20% of the time is bad because reviewers and fanboys will focus on one set of those results. Can you guess which one?
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#11
eidairaman1
Not ever since Intel shut out Nvidia from making a Glue Logic for their Motherboards...

by: TheLaughingMan
Most likely they will. It has been clear since LLano that AMD has a distinct advantage in GPU power over Intel. The only hope Intel has for getting that contract over AMD is to get Nvidia to co-sign with them and that is not likely to happen.

Glad to see AMD learns from its mistakes here. Marketing the performance as 2 module/4 core with a comparison to the 2 core/ 4 thread design of Intel. They need to work out GF issues as stated and working on getting performance for Bulldozer Architecture to be consistent which I have said time and time again. Consistence AMD. Being just as good 70% of the time, better 10% of the time, and absolutely destroyed 20% of the time is bad because reviewers and fanboys will focus on one set of those results. Can you guess which one?
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#12
Super XP
Now this is interesting. Will they be releasing Trinity for the desktop too?
Good to see AMD focusing on strategy. This should enable them to sort out its issues without slowing down production.
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#13
Wiselnvestor
Finally. People will soon have a choice and don't have to rely on VLC player for gaming.
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#14
San_Lex
9600m gt

my 9600m gt have 2200 points in 3dmark vantage :)
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#15
Dent1
by: San_Lex
my 9600m gt have 2200 points in 3dmark vantage :)
So? Whats your point?
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#16
de.das.dude
Pro Indian Modder
by: Wile E
I don't ever plan to game on an ultra portable, so as long as the integrate graphics can handle outputting to 1920x1200 to my monitor, I don't care. CPU power and battery life is what matters to me in this segment.
you mean you will stick to intel no matter what crap they trow at you :p
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#17
MikeMurphy
by: Super XP
Now this is interesting. Will they be releasing Trinity for the desktop too?
Good to see AMD focusing on strategy. This should enable them to sort out its issues without slowing down production.
Yes. Desktop part should be quite exciting.
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#19
bencrutz
by: San_Lex
my 9600m gt have 2200 points in 3dmark vantage :)
well, trinity A10 APU put your 9600m gt "discrete gpu" to shame :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#20
TheLaughingMan
by: San_Lex
my 9600m gt have 2200 points in 3dmark vantage :)
Now image a tablet like the Transformer or Motorola Atrix with enough power to actually play a game or two at say 1366 x 768. Now impressive for us, but to run that resolution for Bad Company 2 on medium/High at solid FPS under 25W is kinda ridiculous.

by: Super XP
Now this is interesting. Will they be releasing Trinity for the desktop too?
Oh they most definitely will. This was actually one of th reasons a lot of people were pissed because AMD will have a distinct line drawn between consumer desktops/portable products and their high end stuff. Before you could get all the high end parts with an entry level CPU and then update just the CPU later. Now you have to make a distinct choice up front.

I hope the A8 Trinity APUs have enough muscle to run up to two mid-ranged cards in CrossfireX so those who chose that path don't have to start from scratch if they want a gaming setup.
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#21
Thefumigator
The other day I was playing around with a core i5 laptop and it wasn't 100% smooth when playing certain youtube videos. I could notice it instantly. A variant of the same model sporting a discrete card solved the problem. No matter how small the discrete card is, its often a good choice to have it (at least if you are not satisfied with intel gfx)
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#22
eidairaman1
Honestly AMD should go back to the Athlon XP Modeling setup. You had Duron/Sempron, Athlon XP/XP-M and the Athlon MP, All Socket A/462. It would reduce overall costs but also Allow Improvements in the APU designs while reducing Package Complexities. Also the current A75Chipset supports 8x8 Crossfire or 16x4.

by: TheLaughingMan
Now image a tablet like the Transformer or Motorola Atrix with enough power to actually play a game or two at say 1366 x 768. Now impressive for us, but to run that resolution for Bad Company 2 on medium/High at solid FPS under 25W is kinda ridiculous.



Oh they most definitely will. This was actually one of th reasons a lot of people were pissed because AMD will have a distinct line drawn between consumer desktops/portable products and their high end stuff. Before you could get all the high end parts with an entry level CPU and then update just the CPU later. Now you have to make a distinct choice up front.

I hope the A8 Trinity APUs have enough muscle to run up to two mid-ranged cards in CrossfireX so those who chose that path don't have to start from scratch if they want a gaming setup.
Posted on Reply
#23
Wile E
Power User
by: Zen_
More applications and media are being GPU accelerated though, and it can be more efficient. AMD's UVD works really well, Chrome supports GPU acceleration, flash content can be accelerated, and there's going to be more support down the road.

If AMD can get the manufacturing kinks hammered out and improve power efficiency over Llano there's no doubt in my mind that Trinity will be a home run.
Don't care. If the CPU can do it smoothly, the GPU does not concern me in the slightest, so long as it's capable of outputting to the resolutions I want.
by: de.das.dude
you mean you will stick to intel no matter what crap they trow at you :p
No, I mean that in an ultraportable, I will always take more CPU power over more GPU power. I don't want to game on a laptop of this size, so GPU power is completely irrelevant when the CPU is already enough to do what is needed for me.

If I were to buy in this segment, I would take the one that gives me the best cpu power/battery life/cost ratio. Don't know who that is, and don't care, so long as it does what I want.

I'm sorry, but I don't buy lesser performing products for the sake of a brand name. I buy the best performance for my money, period. I am 100% unconcerned with the corporate angle of any of these competitors. I only care about the product and what it does for me.
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#24
TheGuruStud
And that's why humans are in a continual downward spiral.

Who cares about the moral, legal or ethical implications of XYZ. IT'S ALL ABOUT ME GD IT!
Posted on Reply
#25
TheLaughingMan
by: Thefumigator
The other day I was playing around with a core i5 laptop and it wasn't 100% smooth when playing certain youtube videos. I could notice it instantly. A variant of the same model sporting a discrete card solved the problem. No matter how small the discrete card is, its often a good choice to have it (at least if you are not satisfied with intel gfx)
You seem like you have not seen what an AMD APU can do. Most low end or entry level decrete GPU's can't stand toe to toe with the APU's IGP. Intel GFX was no even a fair comparison. APU verse current Intel IGPs is like have a street race between a Mustang and Prius.

by: Wile E
No, I mean that in an ultraportable, I will always take more CPU power over more GPU power. I don't want to game on a laptop of this size, so GPU power is completely irrelevant when the CPU is already enough to do what is needed for me.

If I were to buy in this segment, I would take the one that gives me the best cpu power/battery life/cost ratio. Don't know who that is, and don't care, so long as it does what I want.

I'm sorry, but I don't buy lesser performing products for the sake of a brand name. I buy the best performance for my money, period. I am 100% unconcerned with the corporate angle of any of these competitors. I only care about the product and what it does for me.
While I can agree with you to a degree, there is a lot you could do with GPU acceleration in a tablet or ultraportable laptop. If you have used a Linux based OS like Ubuntu, you should know how awesome effects on a GPU accelerated desktop space can be. Not to mention being able to convert videos on the tablet to a format it supports without the need of another computer. Image correction via GPU acceleration to improve post processing on images taken with its 3 to 5 MP camera. And like someone said, it is nice when I can connect my tablet or ultra portable to a TV via HDMI and output 1080p with stutter or spikes in performance or without over heating a small device.

While CPU power is important, you pointed it out yourself. WTF do you do on something so small that would need a lot of CPU or GPU power? You browse the net, look at some photos, watch a video, listen to music, etc. What exactly would the addition CPU power be for?
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