Friday, February 24th 2012

ASUS Z9PE-D8-WS Motherboard Up For Pre-Order

ASUS' dual-LGA2011 workstation motherboard, the Z9PE-D8-WS, has been listed by Canadian retailer NCIX for pre-order. It is priced at CA $632.98 (US $634.56). The store page does not go on to mention availability, except that orders will be shipped whenever there are inventories. Given its pre-order listing, we expect the product-launch of the Z9PE-D8-WS not to be too far, considering Intel's launch of a large number of "Sandy Bridge-EP" Xeon processors is just around the corner (within Q1, 2012). The Z9PE-D8-WS is designed to support 2P configurations based on Xeon "Sandy Bridge-EP" processors. The motherboard is further detailed here. To PC enthusiasts, it presents a potential alternative to EVGA's SR-X.

Image Courtesy: VR-Zone
Add your own comment

23 Comments on ASUS Z9PE-D8-WS Motherboard Up For Pre-Order

#1
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
Many Thanks to IvTK for the tip.
Posted on Reply
#2
DualAmdMP
WOW....it looks amazingly designed.

Hope Gigabyte step in soon:)
Posted on Reply
#3
Yo_Wattup
So with 2 cpus, say with 6 cores each, is it basically the same as a 12 core equivalent? I.e. thread count just doubles. Or is there more/less advantages than that?
Posted on Reply
#4
Flanker
I wonder if there is enough room to stick 2 SBE SilverArrows . That would look amazing
Posted on Reply
#6
Chaitanya
by: Yo_Wattup
So with 2 cpus, say with 6 cores each, is it basically the same as a 12 core equivalent? I.e. thread count just doubles. Or is there more/less advantages than that?
It actually isn't, things are usually more complicated in terms of processor management with multiple processors.

read this article: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:eDmOvTXuVSMJ:www.csa.com/discoveryguides/multicore/review.pdf+multi+core+processors&hl=en&gl=ca
Posted on Reply
#7
Quantos
There's not much free space on that one! :twitch:
Posted on Reply
#8
xaira
linus...you must unbox
Posted on Reply
#10
DanTheBanjoman
SeƱor Moderator
by: Chaitanya
It actually isn't, things are usually more complicated in terms of processor management with multiple processors.

read this article: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:eDmOvTXuVSMJ:www.csa.com/discoveryguides/multicore/review.pdf+multi+core+processors&hl=en&gl=ca
In the real world there basically is no difference. The OS handles both configurations in the same way and nearly no programmer should ever care about assigning tasks to CPU's on this level. The only remotely relevant difference I can think of is memory management. Utilizing NUMA could be relevant in some cases and is different. For us normal users and enthusiasts the only difference is having double the memory controllers > potentially double the amount of DIMMs without requiring registered memory.
Posted on Reply
#11
blibba
If there's no overclocking on the DP capable Xeons, as predicted so far, gamers will still be better on P67/Z68.
Posted on Reply
#12
Dj-ElectriC
I'm having the weirdest boner right now...
Posted on Reply
#13
GC_PaNzerFIN
by: Flanker
I wonder if there is enough room to stick 2 SBE SilverArrows . That would look amazing
2 Prolimatech Super Megas should fit just fine and they pretty much equal to SA. Layout looks good enough.
Posted on Reply
#14
DriedFrogPills
by: Yo_Wattup
So with 2 cpus, say with 6 cores each, is it basically the same as a 12 core equivalent? I.e. thread count just doubles. Or is there more/less advantages than that?
also bear in mind that to utilise both sockets you will need to use Xeon not I7's which means 8 cores.
Posted on Reply
#15
KieX
Will this have any OC features, or is it purely a Workstation board?
Posted on Reply
#16
DualAmdMP
by: KieX
Will this have any OC features, or is it purely a Workstation board?
"There are a myriad of options. First, you can change the CPU multiplier all the way to beyond 50, if the CPU supports it - this one didn't, as expected, since all C-stepping Xeon E5 for now have locked multipliers.

Then, you can change the CPU, chipset, QPI, PCIe and memory voltages; force memory to run at higher speeds like 1866 and 2133MHz, and change primary and secondary memory latency timings, with over a dozen settings to control. The latter one worked very well, as I managed to push various kinds of memory well above their designated speeds, and get corresponding bandwidth increases. How does eight channels of memory at DDR3-1600 CL 6-6-6-16 sound, yet at CR1 command rate?"
Posted on Reply
#17
Dj-ElectriC
Just one thing bothers my mind, why aren't the SATA connectors angled...
Posted on Reply
#19
GC_PaNzerFIN
by: Dj-ElectriC
Just one thing bothers my mind, why aren't the SATA connectors angled...
That is huge motherboard and doesn't fit majority of cases. Very unlikely that any mass produced case is going to have cable holes in right spot/room enough for angled connectors on the edge of the board.

Morgoth: It is HPTX.
Posted on Reply
#20
Jizzler
^ VR-Zone is reporting it as SSI EEB, and from eyeing the picture, it looks like it.

If so, then plenty of cases available with room for angled connectors. That's where you'd usually find one or two Mini-SAS connectors (angled) on boards like this, so cases are designed for it.
Posted on Reply
#21
GC_PaNzerFIN
by: Jizzler
^ VR-Zone is reporting it as SSI EEB, and from eyeing the picture, it looks like it.

If so, then plenty of cases available with room for angled connectors. That's where you'd usually find one or two Mini-SAS connectors (angled) on boards like this, so cases are designed for it.
I think you are right, it is SSI EEB. EVGA SR-X is HPTX according to vr-zone. They talked about both boards in same news post a while ago and I remembered wrong.
Posted on Reply
#22
ypsylon
One look at board will tell anyone with a bit of knowledge that it is SSI EEB. With HPTX space you get horizontal memory banks. With SSI-EEB such placement is not possible - LGA2011s are enormous!

Anyway... for a WS board I consider it pretty average. There is no hardware RAID on board for starters. WS should be treated as WS first and OC toy later. Also anyone who will buy it will be forced into liquid cooling. Top PCI-Ex slot touches mem banks which will be pain when expanding memory, replacing sticks without removing VGA/RAID controller. Hmm... I don't care about X79, as I own X58 systems. But if I had to choose between Asus and EVGA I would pick EVGA's SR-X. I heard support for RAID controllers has been improved on than particular EVGA board (EVGA boards and hardware RAID controllers aren't perfect friends...). There is more space, it offers same [limited] connectivity as Asus-WS board. There is plenty of space between memory banks and expansion slots. HPTX is not an issue as I have compatible case.

The only advantage that Asus hold over EVGA is Intel server class NIC. But if you spend $$$$ on a powerful WS then buying one card with powerful NIC(s) isn't an issue.
Posted on Reply
#23
cadaveca
My name is Dave
by: ypsylon
Top PCI-Ex slot touches mem banks which will be pain when expanding memory, replacing sticks without removing VGA/RAID controller.
The ram slots are the normal ASUS type that does not have this problem, as the clips are only on the top-half of the DIMM slot, and the bottom half only requires you push the DIMM in with a bit of force. I personally od not like these "clips", but they do prevent that issue you mentioned..

External RAID control provided by a Marvell controller.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment