Friday, March 2nd 2012

Gigabyte's First Micro-ATX G1.Killer Motherboard Pictured

A little earlier, we were treated to pictures and details of the Gigabyte G1.Sniper 3 motherboard based on Intel Z77 chipset, supporting LGA1155 "Ivy Bridge" and "Sandy Bridge" processors. Presenting, Gigabyte's first G1.Killer series motherboard in the micro-ATX form-factor, the G1.Sniper M3. This new board is based on the same Z77 chipset, and is backed by a fairly exhaustive feature-set that makes it a formidable high-end micro-ATX gaming desktop choice (good for LAN party rigs). The LGA1155 socket is powered by a 9-phase VRM, which draws power from a 4-pin ATX connector (instead of 8-pin EPS). The socket is wired to four DDR3 DIMM slots, supporting dual-channel memory.

Out of the four expansion slots this form-factor permits, three slots on this board are physical PCI-Express x16. The topmost one is PCI-Express 3.0 x16 (x16/x8), the bottom-most one is electrical PCI-Express 3.0 x8. These two slots are wired to the CPU. The x16 slot in the middle of the two is electrical PCI-Express 2.0 x4, wired to the Z77 PCH. Then there's a PCI-Express 2.0 x1, also wired to the PCH. SATA connectivity doesn't rely on any third-party controllers, internally there are two SATA 6 Gb/s ports, three SATA 3 Gb/s, the fourth 3 Gb/s port is wired out as eSATA, on the rear panel.



Further, the board doesn't rely on third-party USB 3.0 controllers. There are just four USB 3.0 ports, two on the rear-panel, two via front-panel header, all four wired to the PCH. Like the G1.Sniper 3, this board lacks fancy Creative or Bigfoot made connectivity. It makes use of Creative Sound Core3D audio, which is backed by amplifier circuitry that's better ground-isolated from the rest of the motherboard; and Intel 82579V gigabit Ethernet. Display connectivity includes one each of DVI, D-Sub, HDMI, and DisplayPort. A number of USB 2.0 ports top it off.


Source: VR-Zone
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31 Comments on Gigabyte's First Micro-ATX G1.Killer Motherboard Pictured

#2
erocker
Looks like Gigabytes G1 boards are getting kinda plain looking. So now, make things black and green and call it a G1. Okay. :ohwell:
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#3
jbunch07
There is something about black and green that I've always like when it comes to computers...probably because u don't see it as much as black and red or black and blue. Which I think are incredibly overdone. But looks aside I'm glad that matx boards are gaining popularity with the enthusiasts/gamers they are entirely practical with today's technology.
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#4
cadaveca
My name is Dave
"G1 series" refers more to the Creative card built in and the Killer NIC. But i do not see the KillerNic...yeah, plain would be right!

Also, BTA, I do see a Creative CKA02? chip there.
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#5
TheLostSwede
It's got a Creative Sound Core3D audio chip, not Realtek
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#6
blibba
This is a bit tame really. VRM and power setup rules it out for MATX super-performance rigs, PCI-E slot bandwidths rules it out for most MATX multi-gpu rigs. So it's just another mid-high end MATX board.

Move along, move along; nothing to see here.
Posted on Reply
#7
cadaveca
My name is Dave
by: blibba
VRM and power setup rules it out for MATX super-performance rigs, PCI-E slot bandwidths rules it out for most MATX multi-gpu rigs. So it's just another mid-high end MATX board.
Have you ever tried one of ASUS's Gene boards? They are pretty good, hopefully this will be similar. I see reason for it not to be...1155 CPUs barely pull 150W when OC'd and running LinX, so VRM design ain't so important, really.

Although, of course, the "G.1-Series" isn't Gigabyte's OC product, anyway.
Posted on Reply
#8
blibba
by: cadaveca
Have you ever tried one of ASUS's Gene boards? They are pretty good, hopefully this will be similar. I see reason for it not to be...1155 CPUs barely pull 150W when OC'd and running LinX, so VRM design ain't so important, really.

Although, of course, the "G.1-Series" isn't Gigabyte's OC product, anyway.
The Maximus IV Gene makes this board look like a joke. It has much better everything (possibly except audio chip).
Posted on Reply
#9
cadaveca
My name is Dave
Time will tell, and hopefully I'll get a chance to try both. In fact, I wil ldirectly ask both ASUS and GIgabyte for those boards to make that compare, just for you. ;) I'm sure many others are gonna want that reviewed, too.

To be honest I don't see anything particularily wrong with the board. Kinda miss the KillerNIC though. The only thing that stands out is the 4-pin CPU power connector, but agian, 1155 IB chips wil literally sip the power, with a 77W TDP... and 144W should be enough to OC thse chips, so only a single 4-pin is really needed, anyway.
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#10
blibba
I was thinking x8 slot placement, VRM/power delivery, SATA ports, rear-panel USB ports, reset button on board...

The Gigabyte does of course have the advantage of being Z77, whereas the Maximus IV Gene is Z68. Not sure how much that matters, yet.
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#11
cadaveca
My name is Dave
ASUS should have a Z77 Gene too, which is what I was refering too. I've already reviewed the Z68 Gene, and yeah, it's damn good. That siad, ahving played with that one, and many other boards, I don't think any of those things, other than the switches, are real issues. They cannot cater to everyone with every product, but your concerns are definitely valid, if that's what you are after.

I'm just overly eager to play with another UEFI Gigabyte board! The X79 boards are pretty damn good!
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#12
blibba
by: cadaveca
...1155 IB chips wil literally sip the power, with a 77W TDP... and 144W should be enough to OC thse chips, so only a single 4-pin is really needed, anyway.
Slightly off-topic, but out of interest, how did you come to 144W?
Posted on Reply
#13
cadaveca
My name is Dave
77W x2? IB chips should be 77W TDP, as far as I know. That coudl have changed, of course, since the chips aren't out yet.


SB chips are 95W stock, don't need 190W, so that seemed like a safe number. Very few current Intel chips can even exceed double the TDP, unless under extreme cold.
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#14
blibba
Ok, fair enough.

I feel like an arse for posting this, as it doesn't change anything, but, er...

77x2 isn't 144 :(
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#15
cadaveca
My name is Dave
I know. Like I said, very few chips might reach double TDP. Not a single chip i've seen can(but of course, such a chip may in fact exist), and I've gone through many many SB chips over the past 14 months or so. I don't think IB will even pull 150, so I said 144. I haven't seen a chip pull more than 150W on air(and be stable), and IB should pull less with it's smaller process.
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#16
(FIH) The Don
milk the friggin G1 cow a bit more GB, atleast make the board look a bit interesting -.-
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#17
cavemanthreeonesix
had high hopes for this board but GB have seriously let me down.

Sli/x-fire is ruled out, only 4 sata ports, no led debug, no power/reset switch and that vrm, they've just stuck a core3d chip on the z77 ud3 and cut it in half :shadedshu

asrock or asus then as i doubt msi will bring a high end matx board to the party
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#19
Steven B
by: blibba
This is a bit tame really. VRM and power setup rules it out for MATX super-performance rigs,
Not true.
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#20
blibba
by: Steven B
Not true.
Well, when you add emphasis like that...

Define "super-performance". In fairness though, in light of Cadaveca's comments, you're probably right. The proof will be in the pudding.
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#21
arnoo1
looks cheap -_-, needs more heatsinks and more stuff
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#23
Steven B
You can easily have a 6 phase design that out-performs many other designs, you can have as much current as you want per phase, you just have to increase component quality.

By the looks of it, the change in the inductors, could hint towards more current capability per phase.

phase count is only important when all manufacturers use the same quality per phase, which has never been true.
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#24
LAN_deRf_HA
I'd of preferred they kept the killer NIC instead of the creative shit if they're going with a Core3D. Doesn't offload open al and adds unjustified costs. If someone gave me this for free I'd still get a real sound card for it.
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#25
Liquid Cool
Reminds me of the XFX MI93007(Click for Pic)) I owned - twice. Made for a nice themed build since XFX was 'market savvy' enough to produce matching video cards.

Even though I didn't care for magazine clips and cheesy fake handguns as SB coolers...I do like the recent color themes from Gigabyte...with DFI out of the picture I've noticed Gigabyte delving into their color schemes?

Best,

LC
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