Monday, April 9th 2012

NoFAN Announces Two New Fanless Cases

Korean fanless PC company NoFAN announced two new cases, the micro-ATX CS-70, and the ATX (mid-tower) CS-80. The cases ensure they stay fanless after installation, by including fanless PSUs and CPU coolers. The cooler included is the CR-100C, which is guaranteed to fit in these cases. Both cases include a P-400A fanless PSU with 400W capacity. Measuring 235 x 487 x 284 mm (WxDxH), the CS-70 has three 3.5" drive bays, and one each of exposed 5.25", and 2.5" bays. It includes USB 3.0 front-panel ports (standard header), apart from audio ports.

The CS-80, on the other hand, bears more conventional looks, measuring 200 x 490 x 470 mm. It has a 100% tool-free design, with three exposed 5.25" drive bays, apart from six 3.5" bays. Its front-panel includes an eSATA port apart from USB 3.0 and audio. Although both cases have provisions for fans, they obviously don't include any. Pricing and availability information is awaited.

Source: FanlessTech
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20 Comments on NoFAN Announces Two New Fanless Cases

#1
Huddo93
Is the CS-70 meant to look so similar the Silverstone FT03? :S
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#2
theJesus
These look really familiar; I thought they were already out. Are they just slightly updated versions?
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#3
hhumas
cpu cooler is awesome like a turbine
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#4
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: Huddo93
Is the CS-70 meant to look so similar the Silverstone FT03? :S
And the CS-80 looks similar to a particular case from InWin.
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#5
THE_EGG
by: btarunr
And the CS-80 looks similar to a particular case from InWin.
so basically they take already made cases, strip the fans out and probably charge a premium of silverstone and inwin. Sounds a lot like a Porsche GT3 RS, costs more and they take everything out.
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#6
theJesus
by: THE_EGG
so basically they take already made cases, strip the fans out and probably charge a premium of silverstone and inwin. Sounds a lot like a Porsche GT3 RS, costs more and they take everything out.
Don't forget the oversized cooler though.
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#7
micropage7
its very interesting that nowadays processor could get cooled using passive cooler
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#9
m1dg3t
I'd like to see a review of these with thermal imaging to show the cooling effect, or lack thereof
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#10
Eternalchaos
by: theJesus
Don't forget the oversized cooler though.
and overpriced, I believe the cooler costs £80+ I remember Overclock3D reviewed it last year
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#11
jihadjoe
by: micropage7
its very interesting that nowadays processor could get cooled using passive cooler
Not really. x86 processors made do without coolers from 1978 (8086) until 1993, when the first Pentiums came out. One of my first rigs was a Siemens-built 286-16 (was overclocked to 20 by changing the clock crystal). It didn't have anything remotely resembling a heatsink, and it didn't even get notably warm to the touch during operation.

The first CPU I had that actually made use of an HSF was a Pentium 100. It had a miniscule cooler, and didn't even make use of any TIM. The tiny heatsink just sat on top of the CPU and an equally tiny fan clipped both of them onto the socket. I bet it would work fine today passively cooled using just a chipset cooler and a good adhesive thermal pad.

x86 processors only started to need real cooling (HSF fastened tightly onto the CPU with TIM in between) with the Pentium Pro in 1995.
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#12
THE_EGG
by: theJesus
Don't forget the oversized cooler though.
again hahaha the GT3 RS analogy comes into play, bigger engine ;) I do think though it would be pretty cool (or rather warm) to have a fanless system.
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#13
rpsgc
CS-70 = Silverstone Fortress 3
CS-80 = InWin BUC

Just replace the PSU, slap it an oversized cooler and call it your own.
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#14
_JP_
Those chassis still need forced convection to move the hot air. The CPU cooler is massive! :eek:
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#15
Depth
by: _JP_
Those chassis still need forced convection to move the hot air. The CPU cooler is massive! :eek:
Looks ok to me, hot air rises out of the mesh on top, room temperature air flows in through the bottom.
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#16
Ahhzz
Think one should attach a turbine like on the top of a roof to assist the air flow :)
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#18
douglatins
Fanless is stupid, less than 1000Rpm rotation with descent bearing is inaudible unless you live inside a recording studio. And could net a lot better results than no fan at all.
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#19
ktr
by: Octavean
I went to Costco and came across some fanless fans from Dyson. Sure it could move some air but it wasn’t silent, it wasn’t reasonably and a standard fan could do a better job (IE move more air efficiently):

http://www.dyson.com/store/fans.asp?utm_source=MSN&utm_medium=CPC&utm_campaign=CPC

I hope these cases don’t use the same principles. In my mind if its not cheaper and it doesn’t perform better then I don’t see the point.
Those are not fanless. The fan is located in the base.
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#20
eidairaman1
wuts funny is despite fanless design, as the machine runs hotter the more power it draws.
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