Sunday, May 6th 2012

LG’s New Cloud Monitors Combine UPoE and IPS to Create a Total Business Solution

LG Electronics (LG) unveiled its advanced P Series of cloud monitors, allowing companies to do away with desktops and laptops altogether. The new VMware-based Zero Client monitors can be networked to create a virtual comput-ing system and come packaged with Cisco’s Universal Power over Ethernet (UPoE) technology, enabling centralized resources, greater system security and reduced costs.

“These monitors are a highly appealing option for the next generation workspace archi-tecture,” said J. J. Lee, Executive Vice President and Head of IT Business Unit of LG Home Entertainment Company. “The P Series combines two technologies -- cloud monitor networking and IPS panels -- for a combination that offers exciting new possi-bilities in terms of efficiency in the workplace and gives LG a significant role in virtual computing.”

The P Series is a server-based model and offers a range of unique benefits. First and foremost, because the software is managed from a centralized network, there’s greater security from hacking, viruses and spyware by allowing the data flow to be more easily monitored and blocked if necessary.

LG’s Zero Client Cloud Computing technology also consolidates servers and thus re-quires less hardware. In fact, each station requires only a LAN cable, a keyboard and a mouse. There is no CPU, no memory and no storage. Employees don’t need to install operating systems or software, saving both time and money. Booting speeds are faster than traditional desktops, and the entire system is in line with eco-friendly green com-puting standards.

The P Series uses the VMware platform, which oversees server integration. VMware is an automated virtual infrastructure that helps companies further reduce costs by manag-ing the network and ensuring system efficiency. Because the platform is automated, the delivery of IT services to each work station is faster and compliance to system specifi-cations is guaranteed. The software also schedules secure back-ups and interruption-free system updates.

Cisco’s UPoE technology is particularly appealing for its minimal energy requirements. It delivers power over LAN cabling to networked devices and with the EnergyWise program, UPoE can track power consumption and make adjustments in real-time for greater efficiency. UPoE technology also eliminates cables and connectors, letting em-ployees make better use of their office space.

By using IPS rather than TN (twisted nematic) panels, the 23-inch monitor boasts life-like color reproduction and picture quality regardless of viewing angle. The N2311AZ also reduces eye fatigue, making it the ideal monitor for visual-based occupations like graphic design.
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11 Comments on LG’s New Cloud Monitors Combine UPoE and IPS to Create a Total Business Solution

#1
xaira
so they built a POE thin client into the monitor whop t doo, but its still really cool, all you plug in is the ethernet cable, the keyboard and the mouse and ur off
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#3
james888
After reading that twice I can't wrap my mind around it. So is it like a cloud based, all in one, where the os and everything are on the server?
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#4
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: james888
After reading that twice I can't wrap my mind around it. So is it like a cloud based, all in one, where the os and everything are on the server?
IE thin clent as xaira said.

But this is a pretty good idea actually.
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#5
Shinshin
It's amazing how we were using terminal PCs like 20+ years ago, moved to real PCs after that, and now we are heading back to those terminals again...
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#6
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: Shinshin
It's amazing how we were using terminal PCs like 20+ years ago, moved to real PCs after that, and now we are heading back to those terminals again...
Sir, I take insult to that not to mention your statement is largely inaccurate. Terminal does not imply an old PC. If I put linux on my LGA2011 rig, that doesn't mean it is old. :)

Also as a developer I tend to use the terminal a lot.
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#7
Prima.Vera
So how does this cloud stuff on the monitor actually works?? English please. :)
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#8
Jizzler
by: Prima.Vera
So how does this cloud stuff on the monitor actually works?? English please. :)
Ever connect to another machine using Remote Desktop, LogMeIn, Teamviewer, etc?

Zero Clients are like that in hardware form, removing the need for a traditional computer per employee. Instead of a monitor + ZC unit, the monitor has a ZC built-in.
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#9
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: Aquinus
Sir, I take insult to that not to mention your statement is largely inaccurate. Terminal does not imply an old PC. If I put linux on my LGA2011 rig, that doesn't mean it is old. :)

Also as a developer I tend to use the terminal a lot.
He/she's talking about this. A terminal on a computer (a text terminal) is a great thing yes.
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#10
EpicShweetness
by: Prima.Vera
So how does this cloud stuff on the monitor actually works?? English please. :)
I've worked with VM's quite a bit and the implications for office work is huge! Just have one server with a crap ton of RAM (Quad core CPU) and you can run 8 maybe even 12 computers virtually from that one! All you need is 2 NIC's one for the network,and one more for your forward clients, with a switch of course. With this the "client" would just be the monitor, just plug it in give it an I.P of the VM and now you have the (partial) power of a server!

I would love to have some of these at home, becuase then I could justify a $5000-$7500 rig to my wife :roll:. It can game for me and all the kids at one time!!!:cool:
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#11
remixedcat
This would use something like vmware view to manage the server-client sessions. vmware view connects with VDI/PCoIP to the vm that's done with vsphere/esxi...
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