Saturday, May 12th 2012

TIM is Behind Ivy Bridge Temperatures After All

It's proven: the thermal interface material (TIM) used by Intel, inside the integrated heatspreader (IHS) of its Core "Ivy Bridge" processors are behind its higher than expected load temperatures. This assertion was first made in late-April by an Overclockers.com report, and was recently put to test by Japanese tech portal PC Watch, in which an investigator carefully removed the IHS of a Core i7-3770K processor, removed the included TIM and binding grease, and replaced them with a pair of aftermarket performance TIMs, such as OCZ Freeze and Coolaboratory Liquid Pro.

PC Watch findings show that swapping the TIM, if done right, can shave stock clock (3.5 GHz, Auto voltage) temperatures by as much as 18% (lowest temperatures by the Coolaboratory TIM), and 4.00 GHz @ 1.2V temperatures by as much as 23% (again, lowest temperatures on the Coolaboratory TIM). The change in TIM was also change the overclockability of the chip, which was then able to sustain higher core voltages to facilitate higher core clock speeds. The report concluded that Intel's decision to use thermal paste inside the IHS of its Ivy Bridge chips, instead of fluxless solder, poses a very real impact on temperatures and overclockability.

Source: PC Watch
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219 Comments on TIM is Behind Ivy Bridge Temperatures After All

#1
Jurassic1024
by: cadaveca
Bullshit. A shim is a bit of metal that will brace the CPU agains the heatsink, and prevent damage to the core. NO R&D involved, jsut a couple of measurements, and cutting some metal, or even plastic.

like this:

http://www.overclockersonline.net/images/articles/coppershims/durontop.jpg



http://www.tweaknews.net/reviews/tsr/img/shim10.jpg


You can pretty much guarantee that extreme guys are gonna want one.
Oh some homemade job? Thought so, because these won't be mass produced, which is what I was talking about. Hence the R&D reference.
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#2
Mussels
Moderprator
by: cadaveca
Bullshit. A shim is a bit of metal that will brace the CPU agains the heatsink, and prevent damage to the core. NO R&D involved, jsut a couple of measurements, and cutting some metal, or even plastic.

like this:

http://www.overclockersonline.net/images/articles/coppershims/durontop.jpg



http://www.tweaknews.net/reviews/tsr/img/shim10.jpg


You can pretty much guarantee that extreme guys are gonna want one.
cheap to make, and worth their weight in gold to people on watercooling after de-lidding their IHS
Posted on Reply
#3
Jurassic1024
by: qubit
That's true, it's a quick thing to design.

Your AMD pic reminds me of when I tried buying a shim for my Athlon XP. I put it on, put the paste on and then the heatsink... and the CPU nearly burned up through lack of proper contact. That particular bit of metal found itself in the bin in no time flat.
If you tried to buy it, how did it get on your CPU? :p
Posted on Reply
#4
Jurassic1024
by: Mussels
cheap to make, and worth their weight in gold to people on watercooling after de-lidding their IHS
Weird that people did that. I had to google back to 2002-2007 to see any reference of it.
Posted on Reply
#5
Mussels
Moderprator
by: Jurassic1024
Weird that people did that. I had to google back to 2002-2007 to see any reference of it.
its been a while since we've needed (or even been able to) remove an IHS. i did it on my socket 939 systems to replace the TIM, iirc.
Posted on Reply
#6
Jurassic1024
by: Mussels
its been a while since we've needed (or even been able to) remove an IHS. i did it on my socket 939 systems to replace the TIM, iirc.
Why not just delid, apply better paste, then relid, rather than go right for direct contact at the risk of damaging the die? Just curious.
Posted on Reply
#7
Mussels
Moderprator
by: Jurassic1024
Why not just delid, apply better paste, then relid, rather than go right for direct contact at the risk of damaging the die? Just curious.
for the same reason we dont stack heatsinks on top of each other, better temps.


i did replace the TIM and re-lid, but i tested without and had better temps. i just didnt want to leave it that way, since i moved my system a lot to LAN parties.
Posted on Reply
#8
Jurassic1024
by: Mussels
for the same reason we dont stack heatsinks on top of each other, better temps.


i did replace the TIM and re-lid, but i tested without and had better temps. i just didnt want to leave it that way, since i moved my system a lot to LAN parties.
What kind of temps were you getting with it on versus off?
Posted on Reply
#9
Mussels
Moderprator
by: Jurassic1024
What kind of temps were you getting with it on versus off?
since i was on air, about 3-5C. had i been on water, i bet the difference would have been larger.
Posted on Reply
#10
Jurassic1024
by: Mussels
since i was on air, about 3-5C. had i been on water, i bet the difference would have been larger.
Not bad. Thanks.
Posted on Reply
#11
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
by: Jurassic1024
If you tried to buy it, how did it get on your CPU? :p
Eh? :confused: An Athlon XP dates from 2003, so I'm talking about a decade ago, lol. Dang, TPU didn't even exist then!
Posted on Reply
#12
zomg
by: RejZoR
Can you even get CPU's without stupid GPU being integrated in the die?
xeon ivy bridge may have gpu part on die, but it will be disabled on most models, so you will save some temperatures and tdp
making xeon ivy bridge best alternative for i7/i5 "without K" models
especially for i5 models, because most xeons have HT, and i5 don't
Posted on Reply
#13
Velvet Wafer
good for overclockers with heart, and bad for stock buyers, that dont want to cut their IHS:laugh:
Posted on Reply
#14
marsey99
its good to see data which doesnt tally with what intel is saying but i want more data before i an convinced.
Posted on Reply
#15
OneCool
by: qubit
Eh? :confused: An Athlon XP dates from 2003, so I'm talking about a decade ago, lol. Dang, TPU didn't even exist then!
Yep.Back in the day. Just as fun then :D
Posted on Reply
#16
_JP_
by: zomg
xeon ivy bridge may have gpu part on die, but it will be disabled on most models, so you will save some temperatures and tdp
making xeon ivy bridge best alternative for i7/i5 "without K" models
especially for i5 models, because most xeons have HT, and i5 don't
You have just changed my upgrade plans completely. I had forgotten about the Xeons entirely.
Posted on Reply
#17
reverze
and xeon has 8mb cache compared to 6mb that i5 has
Posted on Reply
#18
zomg
xeon ivy bridge release date is tomorrow

but they was fabricated for some time, asian market already have them

so it is still a big question what thermal solution they have inside
Posted on Reply
#19
eidairaman1
I felt this was a good move actually. Overclocking took effort. I see it like this go big or go home
Posted on Reply
#21
beck24
by: eidairaman1
so basically someone was thinkin it be cheaper or to cater to extreme overclockers
I hope some bean counter's head will roll! Unacceptable for Intel to cut quality on a new launch.
Posted on Reply
#23
eidairaman1
by: beck24
I hope some bean counter's head will roll! Unacceptable for Intel to cut quality on a new launch.
They wont n intel is not perfect
Posted on Reply
#24
jihadjoe
I don't get the aversion to using shims. Re-lidding the CPU is very inefficient compared to direct touch. Anyways we all did that shimming thing back in the day, and I'm willing to bet most people here didn't have any problems.

Those old Athlon XP/Duron days were awesome.
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