Saturday, May 12th 2012

TIM is Behind Ivy Bridge Temperatures After All

It's proven: the thermal interface material (TIM) used by Intel, inside the integrated heatspreader (IHS) of its Core "Ivy Bridge" processors are behind its higher than expected load temperatures. This assertion was first made in late-April by an Overclockers.com report, and was recently put to test by Japanese tech portal PC Watch, in which an investigator carefully removed the IHS of a Core i7-3770K processor, removed the included TIM and binding grease, and replaced them with a pair of aftermarket performance TIMs, such as OCZ Freeze and Coolaboratory Liquid Pro.

PC Watch findings show that swapping the TIM, if done right, can shave stock clock (3.5 GHz, Auto voltage) temperatures by as much as 18% (lowest temperatures by the Coolaboratory TIM), and 4.00 GHz @ 1.2V temperatures by as much as 23% (again, lowest temperatures on the Coolaboratory TIM). The change in TIM was also change the overclockability of the chip, which was then able to sustain higher core voltages to facilitate higher core clock speeds. The report concluded that Intel's decision to use thermal paste inside the IHS of its Ivy Bridge chips, instead of fluxless solder, poses a very real impact on temperatures and overclockability.

Source: PC Watch
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219 Comments on TIM is Behind Ivy Bridge Temperatures After All

#1
theoneandonlymrk
by: beck24
The problem with IVY is that it as relatively poor over clocker, not that its bad at stock speeds.
thats not the way im seeing it

im intel for a min.

Im top of the pile for a few years with nehalem and sandybridge stomping my main competitor's best effort, 3 years in i bring out ivybridge which again increases performance JUST AS EXPECTED(by me) and actually very good(talking unlidded oc ability and raw IPC) , but their is no real reason at the minute to pass the consumer that much more and much to gain from holding a bit back ,ie performance per watt and lower Tdp's/ higher stock reliability and the knowledge that somethings in the back pocket for closeing season sales and smacking the competition back down, they put shit tim on, on purpose imho, as it was cheaper and kept the product within an envelope they liked(Tdp/temp) it is still better then sandy its just not the leap some expected

if all the Amd flamers had grown up and not slated them so much intel might now have a market competitor pushing them along still , but intel like me a chillin:pimp:
Posted on Reply
#2
blanarahul
Ivy Bridge Extreme

Am I the only one waiting for x79 Ivy Bridge Extreme with 8 cores of cpu sweetness with quad channel memory? :toast: :p
I do hope they use fluxless solder in these CPUs. :banghead:
Posted on Reply
#3
EarthDog
by: beck24
The problem with IVY is that it as relatively poor over clocker, not that its bad at stock speeds.
It is with ambient cooling... however get some DI/LN2 on it like the big boys, and a lot of these scream a lot louder than SB ever did (talking 6Ghz+).
Posted on Reply
#4
Octavean
by: blanarahul
Am I the only one waiting for x79 Ivy Bridge Extreme with 8 cores of cpu sweetness with quad channel memory? :toast: :p
I do hope they use fluxless solder in these CPUs. :banghead:
Only one,…..?

Not likely but if the price is significantly higher as is the case with Sandy Bridge-E / LGA2011 with fewer options then you’re likely going to be among the few willing to pony-up for it. Actually the quad core Sandy Bridge-E Core i7 3820 is about ~$229.99 at Microcenter but most want the 6 core version Core i7 3930K at least.

I will point out I have seen no definitive evidence that Intel will upgrade the X79 / LGA2011 platform with Ivy Bridge-E. Even if they did Intel would likely upgrade the chipset to something like X89 given that they upgraded the prominent P67 / Z68 + line when they introduced Ivy Bridge.

The X79 chipset seemed rushed in order to get the Sandy Bridge-E line out in late 2011 and dropped a lot of expected features. So in retrospect the X79 chipset needs replacing more so then the current Ivy Bridge line needed it. Also since the Sandy Bridge-E / LGA2011 platform was supposedly the higher end option it has no business with a feature deficit with the lower-end (comparatively speaking) Ivy Bridge LGA1155 platform.

BTW, right now I have a Sandy Bridge-E Core i7 3930K / Asus P9X79 Deluxe and its a great platform. Intel Thunderbolt and native USB 3.0 would be nice though,.....
Posted on Reply
#5
theoneandonlymrk
by: EarthDog
It is with ambient cooling... however get some DI/LN2 on it like the big boys, and a lot of these scream a lot louder than SB ever did (talking 6Ghz ).
look, were all mad overclockers on tpu, but i doubt anyone on here runs Ln2 Di 24/7,
and your both backin intel whilst agreeing its a shit ocer at ambient temps and HSF cooled odd.
Posted on Reply
#6
EarthDog
Its not a 24/7 solution, no. it doesnt overclock as well on ambient type cooling correct. But for those that play with extreme cooling, its a beast and can overclock much farther than SB.
Posted on Reply
#7
theoneandonlymrk
by: EarthDog
those that play
right so that be 0.00000000001% of us then:p

fair enough dude i know what your saying but imho its irelivant, to this thread,

If i were going to Oc with Ln2 , i would be very very happy intel put a shit removable tin lid on, as id remove it and strap my joy bucket straight to the chip..:laugh::slap:

but either way ^ghz does not impress no one when Amd cpus on silly scenarios go faster, and this is also irelivant i know..

to me these chips are perfectly as designed by intel, few more quids in their pockets ,imho they are happy sat on a bigger potential performance gain next gen due to clever tdp evaluation and validation

i wish some mofo would sort me a shot at Ln2 clocking id sweep records away i tell thee, i spend all my working days tuneing for performance on mass spectrometers, that and fixin em, i could do some damage im sure:p.
Posted on Reply
#8
Chewy
How "smart" is this chip anyway? Thermal paste anyone? how about some grey poupon.

Well I do hope they come out with a revision, in a few months. I would like an Ivy bridge chip, and future overclockability is pretty important to me ! :)
Posted on Reply
#10
EarthDog
by: theoneandonlymrk
right so that be 0.00000000001% of us then:p
Yeah, I said that... Extreme overclocking is not TPU. :slap: :D


EDIT: Actually, I didnt say that in THIS thread... :p
i wish some mofo would sort me a shot at Ln2 clocking id sweep records away i tell thee, i spend all my working days tuneing for performance on mass spectrometers, that and fixin em, i could do some damage im sure:p.
Riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiight. Come get some... put your money where your mouth is and all that. It takes a more than you know (and I know for certain) to break records.
Posted on Reply
#11
Ravenas
Among a few issues, people got awfully made about this same thing in terms of the "bulldozer" proccesor.

The "piledriver" will be the answer. Intel will give consumers an answer to this problem as well. A company worth 130.83 billion doesn't get there without making their customers happy.
Posted on Reply
#12
kostarum
Hi, I have one question, maybe someone help me. Is it smart to use this method of removing IHS from my Athlon X3 445 and apply Cool Laboratory Liquid Ultra paste on processor core ?

I don't have problems with overheating, but I would like to try limits, that's why I have this idea. Any suggestion, please ?
Posted on Reply
#13
Mussels
Moderprator
by: kostarum
Hi, I have one question, maybe someone help me. Is it smart to use this method of removing IHS from my Athlon X3 445 and apply Cool Laboratory Liquid Ultra paste on processor core ?

I don't have problems with overheating, but I would like to try limits, that's why I have this idea. Any suggestion, please ?
are you willing to kill the chip? if not, dont do it.
Posted on Reply
#14
kostarum
by: Mussels
are you willing to kill the chip? if not, dont do it.
Please explain me better, what to do then ? But I don't see any problem here, I just need to remove IHS from my AMD X3 445, put Liquid Ultra thermal paste, close down IHS, just like the japanese do it with Ivy Bridge.

Or I missing something, please tell me much more detail. Thank you.
Posted on Reply
#15
fullinfusion
1.21 Gigawatts
Any news on a revision yet?

And I think Dave has a cherry chip that's all :D
Posted on Reply
#16
Mussels
Moderprator
by: kostarum
Please explain me better, what to do then ? But I don't see any problem here, I just need to remove IHS from my AMD X3 445, put Liquid Ultra thermal paste, close down IHS, just like the japanese do it with Ivy Bridge.

Or I missing something, please tell me much more detail. Thank you.
if you make a mistake, your CPU is dead. if you cannot afford a new CPU, dont risk it.
Posted on Reply
#17
kostarum
by: Mussels
if you make a mistake, your CPU is dead. if you cannot afford a new CPU, dont risk it.
Ok, but I am aware of it. When I buy thermal paste I will do it. I can afford new CPU so it's no big problem.

Tell me this, please, is there some differencies to AMD IHS or it's the same like on 3770K ? If the procedure got right, what I can expect, 10 degrees lower temperature on 4 GHz ?
Posted on Reply
#18
Mussels
Moderprator
by: kostarum
Ok, but I am aware of it. When I buy thermal paste I will do it. I can afford new CPU so it's no big problem.

Tell me this, please, is there some differencies to AMD IHS or it's the same like on 3770K ? If the procedure got right, what I can expect, 10 degrees lower temperature on 4 GHz ?
sorry i cant help you there. you'll need to find out specific details regarding that CPU, if its soldered on good luck getting it off.
Posted on Reply
#19
Velvet Wafer
it should be soldered, good luck with getting it off working, you will more than probably pry the chip from the substrate when you try to remove the IHS. ;)
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