Tuesday, June 5th 2012

TRENDnet Launches Smallest 500 Mbps Powerline Adapter With Built in Outlet

TRENDnet, a best-in-class wired and wireless networking hardware brand, announces today from Computex Taipei, the launch of the 500 Mbps Compact Powerline AV Adapter with Built in Outlet, model TPL-407E, and the 500 Mbps Compact Powerline AV Adapter Kit with Built in Outlet, model TPL-407E2K, which comes with two TPL-407E adapters.

TRENDnet's innovative TPL-407E connects Internet televisions, media players, game consoles, and computers to the Internet using existing electrical lines. The TPL-407E is about half the size of comparable solutions available today, saving valuable space around crowded electrical outlets.

Never lose an electrical outlet -- simply plug in the TPL-407E, then plug a power strip into the built in electrical outlet on the front of the adapter; you are now free to power all media center or home office devices.

Network one adapter to a router and plug another adapter into any outlet on the same electrical system for instant high speed network access. TRENDnet adapters automatically connect to each other over a secure encrypted signal with no required CD installation. For additional security, press the Sync button to change existing encryption keys. Embedded power saving technology lowers power consumption by up to 70% in standby mode -- resulting in measurable power savings, given that the adapters are always plugged in.

The 500 Mbps Compact Powerline AV Adapter with Built in Outlet, model TPL-407E, comes with a three year limited warranty and will be available from TRENDnet's online and retail partners this coming October.

TPL-407E MSRP: U.S. $64.99

The 500 Mbps Compact Powerline AV Adapter Kit with Built in Outlet, model TPL-407E2K, comes with a three year limited warranty and will be available from TRENDnet's online and retail partners this coming October.

TPL-407E2K MSRP: $109.99
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6 Comments on TRENDnet Launches Smallest 500 Mbps Powerline Adapter With Built in Outlet

#1
theubersmurf
This kind of broadband I've heard of, but have yet to know the limitations and the implementation. Presumably this requires some kind of ISP provided by, the electric company? They need infrastructure that allows your computer to connect to a DNS server from the power lines (presumably they own the power lines in this example)...does anyone have a good grasp on how this infrastructure works? How it differs and how implementable it is? And if it's preferable?

I like the idea of the infrastructure overlapping, but it seems like a major rebuild of existing...well infrastructure again.
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#2
Fourstaff
You have never used a powerline adapter I take it? Basically what happens is you will have a pair of these powerline adapters, one for the router and the other near the "target device", so essentially you are using the existing power cable as your ethernet cable.
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#3
theubersmurf
So this is only for the purposes of LAN, not WAN right?
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#4
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
Correct. ISPs want nothing to do with electric companies.
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#5
james888
Being a powerline... I would expect higher transfer speeds on all powerline adapters. Why isn't there?
What is the range of these? Like could I put on in my neighbors house? Across town? Why not?
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#6
brandonwh64
Addicted to Bacon and StarCrunches!!!
I want to test PLE but the prices are more than I would like to invest in something that may not work properly.
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