Tuesday, July 3rd 2012

Samsung Samples Industry's First 16 GB DDR4 Server Modules

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., the world leader in advanced memory technology, today announced that it has begun sampling the industry's first 16-gigabyte (GB) double data rate-4 (DDR4), registered dual inline memory modules (RDIMMs), designed for use in enterprise server systems.

"By launching these new high-density DDR4 modules, Samsung is embracing closer technical cooperation with key CPU and server companies for development of next-generation green IT systems," said Wanhoon Hong, executive vice president, memory sales & marketing, Samsung Electronics. "Samsung will also aggressively move to establish the premium memory market for advanced applications including enterprise server systems and maintain the competitive edge for Samsung Green Memory products, while working on providing 20 nanometer (nm) class based DDR4 DRAM in the future."


Using 30 nm-class process technology, Samsung sampled new 8 GB and 16 GB DDR4 modules in June, in addition to providing them to major CPU and controller makers. The modules will bring the highest density and performance levels to premium enterprise server systems. Samsung previously introduced the industry's first 30 nm-class 2 GB DDR4 module in December, 2010.

Employing new circuit architecture for computing systems, DDR4 technology boasts the highest performance among memory products available for today's computing systems, which by next year will reach twice the current 1,600 megabits per second (Mbps) of DDR3 based modules. Also, by processing data far more efficiently at a mere 1.2 volts, Samsung's DDR4 modules will reduce power consumption by approximately 40 percent compared to its predecessor DDR3 modules operating at 1.35V.

Samsung will keep working on completion of the JEDEC (Joint Electron Device Engineering Council) standardization of DDR4 technologies and product specifications, which is expected to be accomplished by August.

The company said it will work closely with its customers including server OEMs, as well as CPU and controller makers, to expand the market base for high-density DDR4 modules, of which it plans to begin volume production next year. It also is set to expand the overall premium memory market with its most advanced 20 nm-class based DDR4 DRAM products, which will be available sometime next year at densities up to 32 GB.

Samsung has been leading the advancement of DRAM technology ever since it developed the industry's first DDR DRAM in 1997. In 2001, it introduced the first DDR2 DRAM, and in 2005, announced the first DDR3 using 80 nm-class technology.
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37 Comments on Samsung Samples Industry's First 16 GB DDR4 Server Modules

#1
RejZoR
Consumer 16GB DDR4 modules plz :)
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#2
Yo_Wattup
Awesome. Always good to see technology move forward.

Since we're on the topic, is there any particulare reason DDR4 was never used in GPUs? Why did they go from DDR3 to DDR5?
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#3
Maban
GDDR5 is not the same as DDR5, just as GDDR3 is not the same as DDR3. There was a GDDR4 but it never took off.
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#4
largon
I wonder if the chippery is dual-die TSV or monolithic.
Monolithic 8Gbit DDR3 would be nice.

edit:
Duh. Lookit the picture.
The module is obviously made using just a boatload of 4Gbit ICs.
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#5
Delta6326
Hm any idea when DDR4 motherboards and procs will be out? Haswell? I may skip DDR3 :p
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#6
largon
Most chip foundries are gearing to ramp-up DDR4 mass production later this year so spring '13 might be when the goods start to materialize for us consumers nerds.
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#7
hardcore_gamer
by: Yo_Wattup
Awesome. Always good to see technology move forward.

Since we're on the topic, is there any particulare reason DDR4 was never used in GPUs? Why did they go from DDR3 to DDR5?
GDDR5 is a type of DDR3 modified for GPU use.
Posted on Reply
#8
INSTG8R
by: Delta6326
Hm any idea when DDR4 motherboards and procs will be out? Haswell? I may skip DDR3 :p
Yeah Haswell will support DDR4
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#9
Prima.Vera
by: Yo_Wattup
Awesome. Always good to see technology move forward.

Since we're on the topic, is there any particulare reason DDR4 was never used in GPUs? Why did they go from DDR3 to DDR5?
GDDR5 is based on DDR3 bro. GDDR5 boost more bandwidth and higher freqs. Don't get confused on numbers... ;)
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#10
seronx
by: INSTG8R
Yeah Haswell will support DDR4
Haswell...supports only DDR3.

Haswell/Haswell-E is Dual to Quad Channel DDR3 with speeds officially supported 1333 MHz - 2133 MHz only.
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#11
SIGSEGV
designed for use in enterprise server systems. expected to consumers or retail markets for end user pc on early 2014
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#13
seronx
That doesn't say DDR4 it says DDR3.

As you can tell by its speed
1333, 1600, 1866, 2133 MT/s which are all DDR3 speeds.

Socket R1, R2, R3 are all LGA 2011 and LGA 2011 doesn't support DDR4.
Posted on Reply
#14
INSTG8R
From the 2nd link:
Coming onto the platform, the 2013-2014 server and workstation platforms will be known as Grantly that support both DDR3 and DDR4 with a large number of memory options.
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#15
badtaylorx
ive seen that on chip hell before but it was ddr3....and the premise of the topic was somthing to the effect of--wtf...haswell still ddr3???

plus....dosent that "R" seem a lil funky???
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#16
seronx
Unless LGA 2011 already has DDR4 support Haswell-E will not get DDR4. The only socket that can get DDR4 is LGA 1150.
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#17
INSTG8R
Well Samsung is making it for something? :confused:
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#18
Disruptor4
Wonder what the timings will be on these things.
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#19
blibba
by: RejZoR
Consumer 16GB DDR4 modules plz :)
by: Delta6326
Hm any idea when DDR4 motherboards and procs will be out? Haswell? I may skip DDR3 :p
by: SIGSEGV
designed for use in enterprise server systems. expected to consumers or retail markets for end user pc on early 2014
The only relevance of DDR4 to the consumer market is the potential development of GDDR6.

Current high-end consumer systems don't even benefit from the bandwidth of DDR3. Set your Z77, Z68, X58 or X79 rig to single channel. The performance will barely be altered by a colossal bandwidth reduction. Severs do benefit though, or so I'm told.
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#20
Isenstaedt
by: Yo_Wattup
is there any particulare reason DDR4 was never used in GPUs? Why did they go from DDR3 to DDR5?
As far as I know, the ATi Radeon HD 3870 was the only graphics card to use (G)DDR4.
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#21
seronx
by: disruptor4
wonder what the timings will be on these things.
16-16-16
Posted on Reply
#22
hellrazor
by: Delta6326
Hm any idea when DDR4 motherboards and procs will be out? Haswell? I may skip DDR3 :p
If I get lots of money I might skip both DDR2 and DDR3.
Posted on Reply
#23
SIGSEGV
by: blibba
The only relevance of DDR4 to the consumer market is the potential development of GDDR6.

Current high-end consumer systems don't even benefit from the bandwidth of DDR3. Set your Z77, Z68, X58 or X79 rig to single channel. The performance will barely be altered by a colossal bandwidth reduction. Severs do benefit though, or so I'm told.
maybe you're right or maybe not.
for enthusiasts/high end pc which is built based on their own need, i think they wont use just with a single ddr3 ram, because of its relatively cheap in price and they can boost them with an overclocking unless they dont know how to overclock then buying an expensive one with factory overclocked, but it's possible if they bought a branded/built in pc like dell optiplex which is only use a single 2 gbs ddr3 or they built for bussiness use like internet cafe, gaming center
Posted on Reply
#25
blibba
by: SIGSEGV
maybe you're right or maybe not.
for enthusiasts/high end pc which is built based on their own need, i think they wont use just with a single ddr3 ram, because of its relatively cheap in price and they can boost them with an overclocking unless they dont know how to overclock then buying an expensive one with factory overclocked, but it's possible if they bought a branded/built in pc like dell optiplex which is only use a single 2 gbs ddr3 or they built for bussiness use like internet cafe, gaming center
I don't think you understood the point of my post. I don't really understand the point of yours - yes hardly anyone who knows what they're doing uses single channel, but a) what has this got to do with overclocking, and b) what has this got to do with my post? Also, I hate to be the anal one, but you really ought to clean up posts like that before you hit "post". The grammar and punctuation is bad to the point that it's very difficult to understand for those of us that didn't write it.
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