Tuesday, August 14th 2012

SSD TRIM Command on RAID 0 Possible - With A Few Riders

Intel made it possible for SSDs to utilize the TRIM command feature when striped in RAID 0, provided a few meaty requirements are met. The TRIM command feature works to minimize write performance degradation on SSDs, but thus far it has been impossible to enable the feature on any other host controller mode than standalone AHCI, due to the manner in which the feature works at a physical level.

According to a report, TRIM over RAID 0 will be made possible with Windows 8 operating system, provided the system is running an Intel 7-series chipset (such as Z77 Express), has RAID BIOS (Option ROM) version 11.5 or higher, and Rapid Storage Technology (RST) device driver version 11.5 or higher. While obtaining the required Windows and driver versions is relatively easy, the RAID Option ROM version is in the hands of motherboard manufacturers, who have to release motherboard BIOS updates that include the required RAID Option ROM updates.Sources: TweakTown, Real World Labs
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27 Comments on SSD TRIM Command on RAID 0 Possible - With A Few Riders

#1
Fragman
so M$ payed intel for the TRIM only to work on win 8 Great
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#3
seronx
It works with AMD SB600 and newer southbridges on Windows 7, as well. I did tests with various disk recovery applications with very powerful detection of data and TRIM indeed works.
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#4
RejZoR
I'm waiting the day when SSD's won't have stupid degradation nonsense on write commands and that TRIM will remain a thing of the past. This is really one of the biggest downsides of NAND Flash memory... Something we never had to deal on standard HDD's despite their fragmentation over time.
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#5
seronx
If you received a SSD today you could write 10 to 100 gibibytes(GiB) of data per day for 8 to 9 years. If it fails within that time frame it isn't the NAND Flash.

The degradation of HDDs really only make them last 5 to 8 years if you are lucky. SSDs in perfect shape will always outlast HDDs in perfect shape.
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#6
buggalugs
About time. I dont know why it took so long, more people will use RAID now and they'll sell more drives.
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#7
RejZoR
by: seronx
If you received a SSD today you could write 10 to 100 gibibytes(GiB) of data per day for 8 to 9 years. If it fails within that time frame it isn't the NAND Flash.

The degradation of HDDs really only make them last 5 to 8 years if you are lucky. SSDs in perfect shape will always outlast HDDs in perfect shape.
Sure. On paper. In reality, controller will one day without any symptoms decide to completely die. Something i haven't yet witnessed on any HDD. They always started to have some sort of minor problems or release strange sounds. With SMART monitoring like Crystal Disk Info it's almost impossible for it to die on you by surprise. SSD's on the other hand can, despite the hyped durability and crazy high MTBF ratings...
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#8
seronx
by: RejZoR
In reality, controller will one day without any symptoms decide to completely die.
The controller will always tell you when it is going to die.(This can actually be remedied by fully erasing the drive and reinstalling everything if you have everything enabled the controller won't cause any problems)

Stuttering
BSODs
Random Chkdisks
Drive gets detected but doesn't load something
You try to read you get a glitch

The sudden deaths imply that the controller got overheated this is a problem with the manufacturer not the NAND or Controller. <-- this usually always happens within RMA time.
Another case of sudden death is a bad power supply or bad cables connecting to the power supply. <--- Again, always within RMA time.
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#9
Mussels
Moderprator
by: seronx
The controller will always tell you when it is going to die.(This can actually be remedied by fully erasing the drive and reinstalling everything if you have everything enabled the controller won't cause any problems)

Stuttering
BSODs
Random Chkdisks
Drive gets detected but doesn't load something
You try to read you get a glitch

The sudden deaths imply that the controller got overheated this is a problem with the manufacturer not the NAND or Controller. <-- this usually always happens within RMA time.
Another case of sudden death is a bad power supply or bad cables connecting to the power supply. <--- Again, always within RMA time.
i had stuttering and BSOD's for all of three days before my SSD died. its impossible to know what caused them, until it died completely. all data was lost off the drive.
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#10
mussadek
I think most ppl are mistaken what SSD meant for, if your looking for long term backup or saving your data , then u have to use HDD or Media storage, SSD are good for fast accessing and serving , Ahh and you can buffer your data on it too :ohwell:
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#11
repman244
by: RejZoR
Sure. On paper. In reality, controller will one day without any symptoms decide to completely die. Something i haven't yet witnessed on any HDD. They always started to have some sort of minor problems or release strange sounds. With SMART monitoring like Crystal Disk Info it's almost impossible for it to die on you by surprise. SSD's on the other hand can, despite the hyped durability and crazy high MTBF ratings...
Don't forget all the BSOD problems, whole disk shrinking into 3MB or completely disappearing, and how heavily SSD's rely on it's firmware...

Despite all that it is the future.
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#12
TheMailMan78
Banstick Dummy
Mechanical HD are just to slow for me anymore. Can't stand em. If my SSD died tomorrow guess what......I have a back up. Also I store all my documents on another drive which gets backed up nightly. Only thing on my SSD is programs. Things I can reinstall at any time. Hell its still under warranty. If it dies tomorrow Ill be down for as long as it takes me to install windows on another drive while I send the SSD into RMA.

SSD's are perfectly safe if you take the right precautions. Precautions you should take with ANY DRIVE. Mechanical or not.
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#13
W1zzard
by: seronx
The controller will always tell you when it is going to die
The Intel X25-E SLC SSD in TPU's database server just died one day. Without any warning or reboot or power off. Just *poof* gone.
The replacement drive has been working without issues since, but I am prepared for it to fail at any time. We are too poor for RAID 1 (50$ per month for a 2nd drive), got a real-time backup working though
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#14
Steevo
Too poor for RAID? Ads man ads........

Sell some of us schmucks some of your goodies.
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#15
W1zzard
50$ per month to protect against drive failure that happens like once every few years doesn't look cost effective to me. Especially since we can recover in half a day worst-case, half an hour best case.
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#17
seronx
by: W1zzard
The Intel X25-E SLC SSD in TPU's database server just died one day. Without any warning or reboot or power off. Just *poof* gone.
The replacement drive has been working without issues since, but I am prepared for it to fail at any time. We are too poor for RAID 1 (50$ per month for a 2nd drive), got a real-time backup working though
How much work did it do(in GiB) and how long was it active(24/7? 3 months 6 months?).
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#18
Arctucas
Now Intel needs to allow it on older chipsets (58,67,68).
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#19
eidairaman1
They wont less they get bitched at enough, then again there is like a .000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001% chance they will make it possible.

You have to realize this is intel the greediest semiconductor company around
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#20
james888
by: eidairaman1
ve to realize this is intel the greediest semiconductor company around
Thats saying something when their is like 5 of them
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#21
seronx
by: james888
That's saying something when their is like 5 of them
  1. Intel Corporation
  2. Samsung Electronics
  3. Texas Instruments
  4. Toshiba Semiconductor
  5. Renesas Electronics
  6. Qualcomm
  7. STMicroelectronics
  8. Hynix
  9. Micron Technology
  10. Broadcom
  11. AMD
  12. Infineon Technologies
  13. Sony
  14. Freescale Semiconductor
  15. Elpida Memory
  16. NXP
  17. NVIDIA
  18. Marvell Technology Group
  19. ON Semiconductor
  20. Panasonic
  21. Rohm Semiconductor
  22. MediaTek
  23. Nichia
  24. Analog Devices
  25. Fujitsu Semiconductors
There is more than these...(These are listed by sales)
Posted on Reply
#22
james888
by: seronx
  1. Intel Corporation
  2. Samsung Electronics
  3. Texas Instruments
  4. Toshiba Semiconductor
  5. Renesas Electronics
  6. Qualcomm
  7. STMicroelectronics
  8. Hynix
  9. Micron Technology
  10. Broadcom
  11. AMD
  12. Infineon Technologies
  13. Sony
  14. Freescale Semiconductor
  15. Elpida Memory
  16. NXP
  17. NVIDIA
  18. Marvell Technology Group
  19. ON Semiconductor
  20. Panasonic
  21. Rohm Semiconductor
  22. MediaTek
  23. Nichia
  24. Analog Devices
  25. Fujitsu Semiconductors
There is more than these...(These are listed by sales)
10 on there that I knew were, just forgot. About another 7 I didn't expect (panasonic). The rest I have never heard of. Well glad to know there is so many of them.
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#23
n-ster
I hope I'm not the only one who backs up his,SSD weekly on his HDDs... I have 4tb of HDDs, sacraficing 200gb aint gunna kill anyone. If you can afford an ssd, you usually can afford to back it up to your HDD
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#24
Prima.Vera
by: seronx
The degradation of HDDs really only make them last 5 to 8 years if you are lucky. SSDs in perfect shape will always outlast HDDs in perfect shape.
I take this as a joke. Or you accidentally swapped HDD for SSD. Really now, I have HDD running perfectly from '98, and haven't got 1 problem with them, made by WD, Seagate, Maxtor, Samsung or Hitachi. On the other hand I had 2 SSDs that died on me, first after 3 months, the later, after 1 year. So...
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#25
Mussels
Moderprator
by: Prima.Vera
I take this as a joke. Or you accidentally swapped HDD for SSD. Really now, I have HDD running perfectly from '98, and haven't got 1 problem with them, made by WD, Seagate, Maxtor, Samsung or Hitachi. On the other hand I had 2 SSDs that died on me, first after 3 months, the later, after 1 year. So...
i currently have 13 drives in my system. SSD's die fast, but HDD's die too. most of the deaths are within the first 3 months of owning them.
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