Friday, August 31st 2012

Spire Announces the Versis PC Chassis

Introducing the Spire Versis PC chassis series. The Spire Versis is an completely inverted chassis design, meaning that the mainboard is mounted on the left side of the case. For those who are looking for something different from the standard PC case, the Versis series are a great choice! Featuring a fresh and unique, all meshed front panel design, completely tool free drive bays, Top I/O panel with 1 * USB3.0, 1 * USB2.0 and HD/AC97 audio connectors.

The Versis is supplied with 3 pre-installed fans: 2 x 12 cm Blue LED fans installed on the front and 1 x 9 cm silent fan on the rear. Three additional 12 cm intake fans can be mounted, two on the side panel and one on the top panel. Built from strong 0.6 mm SECC steel this chassis is very robust and durable. The Versis structure design is the new standard with left side mainboard mounting for best space and air-flow / cooling optimalization. There is plenty of room for larger heavy duty (gaming) components such as large CPU cooler and 340 mm long graphic-card, offered to you by Spire - Powered by Innovation.


Main Features:

● Inverted structure for better thermal solution & easy system assembly
● Strong 0.6 mm SECC Steel structure
● Front pre-installed two 120 mm Blue LED fans
● Tool-less drive-bays and expansion slots
● Stylish and unique design for real enthusiasts
● Cool aluminum and all meshed front panel
● Water-cooling holes are pre-drilled to support water-cooling systems
● Standard ATX power supply located on the bottom of the chassis
● Supports up to 340 mm long graphic cards
● Front-Top USB2.0+USB3.0 and HD/AC'97 Audio connections
● Cable management, back panel cable routing
● Quality backed by 2 year manufacturer warranty

Compatibility:
The Spire Versis chassis series are compatible with the ATX and MICRO-ATX standard platforms.

MSRP:
USD 56.95 / EURO 44.95

Availability:
The first model of the Versis chassis series, is part # SP6015B-CE/R and is now available from our factory in Shenzhen China and will be available from our Branches starting 2nd week of September.
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12 Comments on Spire Announces the Versis PC Chassis

#1
Chevalr1c
So the PCI-e slots will end up at the top, right? Does that make any serious difference, cooling wise?
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#2
Chaitanya
by: Chevalr1c
So the PCI-e slots will end up at the top, right? Does that make any serious difference, cooling wise?
yes, take a look at review of Silverstone Tenjim TJ08-E. Also their upcoming Raven Rv-04 also has similar structure.
Posted on Reply
#3
micropage7

sorry Spire, your front panel is pretty bad
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#4
D007
Why have a psu at the bottom?
Heat rises last time I checked. Even just the ambient heat of the PSU casing, would cause the components above it to become hotter, I'd think.. Also, with the fan on the psu pushing air out of the sytem, it would be sucking cold air from the bottom out of the pc.. I'd rather have a top located one, sucking the hot air that rises, out of the pc.. Unless I'm missing something..
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#5
D3luSi0n4L
by: D007
Why have a psu at the bottom?
Heat rises last time I checked. Even just the ambient heat of the PSU casing, would cause the components above it to become hotter, I'd think.. Also, with the fan on the psu pushing air out of the sytem, it would be sucking cold air from the bottom out of the pc.. I'd rather have a top located one, sucking the hot air that rises, out of the pc.. Unless I'm missing something..
The move to bottom mounted power supplies I believe came with the addition of the PSU fan hole in the case. So you could bottom mount your power supply, have it intake from a fan hole below the powersupply and have it spit it right back out the back. This also opens up the top area for fans, radiators, etc.
Posted on Reply
#6
D007
by: D3luSi0n4L
The move to bottom mounted power supplies I believe came with the addition of the PSU fan hole in the case. So you could bottom mount your power supply, have it intake from a fan hole below the powersupply and have it spit it right back out the back. This also opens up the top area for fans, radiators, etc.
Ahh so for things like water loops it should be good I guess.
Virtually all psu's "intake then spit right back out the back".. I don't see any difference there..
But as far as venting an air system, I think I'd rather have the psu mounted up top. Good to know though. Maybe I'll do a water loop someday. :)
Posted on Reply
#7
Static~Charge
by: D007
But as far as venting an air system, I think I'd rather have the psu mounted up top.
This case has a top mount for a 120mm "blowhole" fan (see manufacturer's specs here). You can install a fan there for active cooling or leave it empty for passive cooling.

A power supply cranks out a fair amount of heat on its own. By moving it to the bottom, the power supply doesn't end up sucking in warm air from the case (in other words, it only has to worry about cooling itself).
Posted on Reply
#8
entropy13
by: Static~Charge
A power supply cranks out a fair amount of heat on its own. By moving it to the bottom, the power supply doesn't end up sucking in warm air from the case (in other words, it only has to worry about cooling itself).
This. With a bottom mounted PSU and its fan pointed towards the bottom of the case, it is instead getting air from outside the case, which would pass through its components and out towards the rear. No interaction whatsoever with the air inside the case except if there are some small holes in the other sides of the PSU.

In this specific case, the rear fan would handle the CPU socket area, as well as the side panel (if a fan is installed there). The top fan slot will then take care of the PCIe slots, and if you install another side panel fan, there would then be two fans in total handling the PCIe slots.

Disregarding the optional fan slots for a moment, 2 intake fans at the front and one in the rear is still good enough as a default anyway, especially in this configuration since the heat in the PCIe slots can go up through the unoccupied top fan slot.
Posted on Reply
#9
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: D007
Ahh so for things like water loops it should be good I guess.
Virtually all psu's "intake then spit right back out the back".. I don't see any difference there..
But as far as venting an air system, I think I'd rather have the psu mounted up top. Good to know though. Maybe I'll do a water loop someday. :)
They do, but if mounted on top they get the hot air from the CPU, mounted on the bottom they get air from outside the case, and it goes out the back. Most PSU's generally don't get that hot externally (afaik) so it's not a problem. It wouldn't be anyway, a few degrees here and there doesn't matter really (imo, I stopped caring about that years ago :P). Besides, most cases have fans at the back that blows out the air, and lots of cases have intakes on the side so I dunno what I think. It often feels like cabling is easier when they're bottom mounted. This depends on how the case is of course but still.

Anyway, drop the holes in the side and it'd be good. I kinda like that front panel, angles and stuff but no bling. If they'd lost those .. buttons or whatever it is on the 5.25 covers and made everythin black it'd almost be Batmany.
Posted on Reply
#10
erocker
by: Chevalr1c
So the PCI-e slots will end up at the top, right? Does that make any serious difference, cooling wise?
No, not really. I've had a Lian Li V1000 for years that is "reverse ATX" and there is no difference in terms of cooling. The only positive.. or negative I can get out of it is it may be easier on the GPU fan... Or, it may be more stress on the fan if GPU fans are designed to run upside down.
Posted on Reply
#11
Jacez44
0.6mm steel? I have 0.5mm Aluminum that I can easily bend with my heads.
Posted on Reply
#12
hat
Maximum Overclocker
Well, steel is a good bit stronger than aluminum...
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