Monday, September 17th 2012

Intel "Rosepoint" Atom Combines x86 Cores with WiFi Transceiver

At IDF 2012, Intel showed off an experimental SoC codenamed "Rosepoint," targeted at low power mobile consumer devices. Built on the 32 nm process, the tiny chip combines a full-featured dual-core Atom processor with a WiFi transceiver. This could eliminate the need for external transceivers on Atom-powered devices, reducing the platform's board footprint, and of course, power draw.

The current chip comes with its share of limitations. It supports just 2.4 GHz radio band. According to Intel's Justin Rattner, the chip should scale with Moore's Law, and future versions could have greater capabilities, including cellular data, and built-in antennae. Production versions of the chip aren't due for another two years, so it's safe to assume that Rosepoint is just a development milestone.

Source: Guru3D
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10 Comments on Intel "Rosepoint" Atom Combines x86 Cores with WiFi Transceiver

#1
EpicShweetness
That's pretty cool, it takes the meaning of SoC just 1 extra step forward. Haswell supposed to incorporate the VRM's as well, wonder if this will scale the same? It's really cool to think something that small can do that much today.
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#3
mumak
hm.. Rose Point plans looked quite different few years ago... seems to be just another incarnation and they still don't know which way to go...
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#4
Mussels
Moderprator
CPU GPU and wifi in a single chip could really cut down on space. The only problem of course, is connecting an aerial to it.
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#5
Completely Bonkers
by: btarunr
According to Intel's Justin Rattner, the chip should scale with Moore's Law,
All I can say is b+ll+cks to Justin Rattner because the Atom has never scaled with Moore's law. The Atom is NOW OLD and in it's current generation is less than 1.2x the performance compared to it's original launch 4 years ago. According to Moore's law, Atom should be 4x the performance, not 1.2x the performance of the original.

To consider using an Atom today for x86 windows devices is going to lead to a huge letdown. Atom has been relegated from the PC world to embedded devices. For a NAS it is OK. For a media device it is not OK without additional hardware for the video decoding.
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#6
Mussels
Moderprator
most atoms cant even play youtube videos properly. doesnt mean this tech isnt good - a faster atom WITH this tech (or even if it starts appearing in tablets, phones etc) could be great.
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#7
FreedomEclipse
Crazy Dogmatic Bullsh!t!
by: Mussels
most atoms cant even play youtube videos properly. doesnt mean this tech isnt good - a faster atom WITH this tech (or even if it starts appearing in tablets, phones etc) could be great.
tell them to make a quad core atom!!
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#8
Mussels
Moderprator
by: FreedomEclipse
tell them to make a quad core atom!!
pity flash aint multithreaded
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#9
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: Mussels
pity flash aint multithreaded
The real pity is flash.
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#10
1c3d0g
Don't worry guys, the next version of Atom is supposed to be based on an Ivy Bridge GPU (with only 4 EU's though, but still an enormous improvement). If it still can't handle 1080p video's with post-processing effects though, Intel might as well give up on Atom.
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