Monday, September 17th 2012

AMD "Oland" Radeon HD 8800 Series SKUs Unveiled

Apparently, launch of AMD's Radeon HD 8800 series is close enough for some sources to come up with specifications. The HD 8800 series, according to one source, is based on a new silicon codenamed "Oland," which is built on the 28 nm process, packing 3.4 billion transistors with around 270 mm² die-area. According to the source, the two HD 8800 series models, the HD 8870 "Oland XT" will up performance per Watt and cost-performance ratios over current HD 7800 series, while maintaining current process technologies.

The Radeon HD 8870, according to numbers provided by the source, could offer performance comparable to today's high-end GPUs. The HD 8870 is clocked at 1050 MHz with 1100 MHz PowerTune Boost frequency; while the HD 8850 is clocked at 925 MHz with 975 MHz boost frequency. The memory of both SKUs is clocked at 6.00 GHz, yielding 192 GB/s memory bandwidth. The chips hence have 256-bit wide memory interfaces.

Key details such as stream processor, TMU, and ROP counts are excluded, though the source mentions that the HD 8870 provides up to 75% higher single-precision floating point and up to 60% higher double-precision floating point performance over its prdecessor, the HD 7870. The texture fill-rate is up by 65%. The Radeon HD 8850 offers similar increases over its predecessor, the HD 7850. Find them tabled above.Sources: Read2ch, VideoCardz
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93 Comments on AMD "Oland" Radeon HD 8800 Series SKUs Unveiled

#1
Super XP
Mark my words, we will be Christmas shopping for HD 8970's in Dec 2012. Seeing how the HD 6970 extended the 40nm Process from the HD 5870 and the HD 7970 went 32nm, I can see a massive performance hike with the HD 8970 by as much as 75%. Based on 28nm, Direct 12 (with/full 9, 10 & 11 DX support).

This is the 1st time in 4 generations that AMD is coming out with a complete redesign built from the ground up. It all started with the HD 7900 series. :D
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#2
Casecutter
by: HumanSmoke
it's just that you couldn't actually buy a card until January
And you couldn't actully buy a GTX 680 if you wanted until mid-May!
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#3
theoneandonlymrk
shutup and take my godam money:wtf: allre, oh holdup this isnt the 8970< back in me box ,call me when there is news:shadedshu.

do you think AMD might go all Gk110 on us and not release its big bro for half a year:p
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#4
Kaleid
If the prices and performance is correct then i will get a 8850...easily.
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#5
Lionheart
by: Super XP
Mark my words, we will be Christmas shopping for HD 8970's in Dec 2012. Seeing how the HD 6970 extended the 40nm Process from the HD 5870 and the HD 7970 went 32nm, I can see a massive performance hike with the HD 8970 by as much as 75%. Based on 28nm, Direct 12 (with/full 9, 10 & 11 DX support).

This is the 1st time in 4 generations that AMD is coming out with a complete redesign built from the ground up. It all started with the HD 7900 series. :D
Isn't the HD7970 built on the 28nm process? :confused:
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#6
HumanSmoke
by: Casecutter
And you couldn't actully buy a GTX 680 if you wanted until mid-May!
My bad. I thought this was a thread about an AMD card series...I should have checked the sign as I entered.

Oh well, look on the bright side....we achieved 44 posts before someone -inevitably it seems- managed to denigrate the graphics IHV that the article wasn't about.
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#7
radrok
by: Lionheart
Isn't the HD7970 built on the 28nm process? :confused:
Yes, he has probably mistaken the GPU half node with CPUs full node.

The HD 7970 is based on TSMC's 28nm fabrication process :)
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#8
Nihilus
by: Hilux SSRG
I know the pricing [and performance numbers] is not set in stone yet but the 8870 is still priced too high. Don't know what the performance will be like but I wouldn't shell out more than $225-250 for those 8870 levels of performance.
WHAT?! This is the upper-mid range card in the line-up. It is expected to be closer in power to current top-tier 79xx cards with a $280 LAUNCH price. Keep in mind that the 7870 launched at $350 which was also about the same performance as the 69xx series.
AMD is not going to give away their cards.
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#9
Nihilus
Looking closer at the specs, it seems that they match the performance of the the 79xx series in every way except one - Dual FP performance is on 1:16 in relationship to Single FP, much like the 78xx series. The 79xx series has 1:4 Single to Dual performance. Any thoughts on that? More relative to GPGPU stuff vs. gaming?
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#10
Super XP
by: radrok
Yes, he has probably mistaken the GPU half node with CPUs full node.

The HD 7970 is based on TSMC's 28nm fabrication process :)
Yes got the nodes wrong, forgot about the 32nm issues via GPU.
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#11
sergionography
by: Super XP
Mark my words, we will be Christmas shopping for HD 8970's in Dec 2012. Seeing how the HD 6970 extended the 40nm Process from the HD 5870 and the HD 7970 went 32nm, I can see a massive performance hike with the HD 8970 by as much as 75%. Based on 28nm, Direct 12 (with/full 9, 10 & 11 DX support).

This is the 1st time in 4 generations that AMD is coming out with a complete redesign built from the ground up. It all started with the HD 7900 series. :D
lool were do you get your info from? lol
7900 series are 28nm, first to come out with 28nm
and dx12 isnt even out yet, and it wont be out until windows 9 or something, windows 8 is still dx11 and it wont be out till october
and 75% over last gen wasnt even achieved with 7900 vs 6900 series even with a new architecture AND a die shrink so calm down dude and lets all be realistic :P
what is more likely to happen is that we will get 7970 levels of performance at lower power envelopes, but max performance for 8970 wont be more that 30-40% over 7970 thats if were optimistic because power/performance doesnt scale linear and the bigger die sizes you make the more conservative you would need to be with clockspeed
so its all a matter of finding the perfect blend of size/clocks for the architecture
think of it like the supply/demand curve for business, there is always a sweet spot
this explains why 7870 is on par or even more efficient than kepler cards, while tahiti is less efficient than kepler(even though it performs better)
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#12
nt300
by: sergionography
lool were do you get your info from? lol
7900 series are 28nm, first to come out with 28nm
and dx12 isnt even out yet, and it wont be out until windows 9 or something, windows 8 is still dx11 and it wont be out till october
and 75% over last gen wasnt even achieved with 7900 vs 6900 series even with a new architecture AND a die shrink so calm down dude and lets all be realistic :P
what is more likely to happen is that we will get 7970 levels of performance at lower power envelopes, but max performance for 8970 wont be more that 30-40% over 7970 thats if were optimistic because power/performance doesnt scale linear and the bigger die sizes you make the more conservative you would need to be with clockspeed
so its all a matter of finding the perfect blend of size/clocks for the architecture
think of it like the supply/demand curve for business, there is always a sweet spot
this explains why 7870 is on par or even more efficient than kepler cards, while tahiti is less efficient than kepler(even though it performs better)
You missed his point I think. The 7970 was the beginning of a new architecture that will be extended to the 8970. Like a HD 7970 2nd generation. The 1st generation HD 7970 did not gain as much performance versus the 6970 because it's built from the ground up new. Now that AMD is in the 2nd gen faze I can easy see the HD 8970 topping the charts with about 70% performance over the 7900s.
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#13
PopcornMachine
I hope this is close to accurate. The 8870 under $300 would be very tempting.

They quote the original price for the 7870 at $350, which is now available under $300.

So will the 8870 be even cheaper since it costs 20% less than 7870? :eek:

I guy can dream can't he. :D
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#14
AphexDreamer
Man my 5870 is still doing me great and here we are already on the 8 series? I'm tempted to perhaps wait just one more year to see what the 9 series bring (wait... 9 series? ).
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#15
Morgoth
by: RejZoR
HD8950 or gtfo :P
HD8970x2 or gtfo
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#16
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: AphexDreamer
Man my 5870 is still doing me great and here we are already on the 8 series? I'm tempted to perhaps wait just one more year to see what the 9 series bring (wait... 9 series? ).
As long as they're as good as the 9500Pro was I'm happy. :p
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#17
theoneandonlymrk
by: AphexDreamer
Man my 5870 is still doing me great and here we are already on the 8 series? I'm tempted to perhaps wait just one more year to see what the 9 series bring
ill be moveing on for power effieciency if nothing else, really poor excuse even to me :D

If i see the slightest 9xxx Pr blurb id be easy swayed
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#18
Super XP
by: PopcornMachine
I hope this is close to accurate. The 8870 under $300 would be very tempting.

They quote the original price for the 7870 at $350, which is now available under $300.

So will the 8870 be even cheaper since it costs 20% less than 7870? :eek:

I guy can dream can't he. :D
Despite the great sales of the HD 7900 series, the high prices did sort of backfire on AMD. Many 5800 and 6900 owners did not upgrade because the price was just not right.

If AMD plays there cards right and prices the HD 8900's respectfully, they will make killer sales from existing customer along with new. I can see the 8900's prices very well IMO due to being 2nd Generation 28nm.:respect:

I always skip a generation, and now I am ready to buy a HD 8970, if the price is right, that is.
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#19
AphexDreamer
Games are not keeping up with the graphical power we have and are expecting.
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#20
Super XP
by: AphexDreamer
Games are not keeping up with the graphical power we have and are expecting.
So true, but also blame the game dev's for complete laziness.
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#21
Morgoth
no its the publishers and investors
also if you want top of the state grapics, we could give you that but your hardware wil criple from it
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#22
happita
by: Super XP
Despite the great sales of the HD 7900 series, the high prices did sort of backfire on AMD. Many 5800 and 6900 owners did not upgrade because the price was just not right.
This is so true, at least in my situation. I've been eyeing some cards as of late, but I just can't justify spending $250 on a 7850/7870 for ~15%-20% increase in performance, seeing as I spent $250 on my 5850 to begin with.

When the 8k series hit, I'll be looking to spend ~$300-$350, and if I can't get a 50% increase in performance versus my 5850, then I will hold onto it for another generation, screw it :D

by: AphexDreamer
Games are not keeping up with the graphical power we have and are expecting.
Well, I can see me benefitting from a card upgrade as I play BF3 and will be getting Metro:Last Light, which is going to put every system down on their knees. And also, it can't hurt seeing as you have a lot more possibility to max out the AA/AF with SuperSampling which is extremely taxing on just about ALL new games out today.
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#23
eidairaman1
die shrinks are cool, just that i think companies should stick to a single node for a few product series that way they can refine them to max potential. It would reduce the overhead of retooling everytime
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#24
Mathragh
by: eidairaman1
die shrinks are cool, just that i think companies should stick to a single node for a few product series that way they can refine them to max potential. It would reduce the overhead of retooling everytime
Well its just a tradeoff, either improve on the current process, or gain improvement from a new one and focus less on arch and more on the new process.

Apparently untill now the tradeoff was almost always clear: migrating to a new process means more of a performance increase then improving on the arch on the current process.
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#25
eidairaman1
by: Mathragh
Well its just a tradeoff, either improve on the current process, or gain improvement from a new one and focus less on arch and more on the new process.

Apparently untill now the tradeoff was almost always clear: migrating to a new process means more of a performance increase then improving on the arch on the current process.
i think they could improve GCN on the current process node without a shrink and release models with 1, 2, 4 GB Cards.
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