Thursday, November 1st 2012

Top Intel Ivy Bridge-E Core Processors To Still Pack Six Cores

Intel's 2011-launched Core i7 "Sandy Bridge-E" HEDT platform is based on a 32 nm silicon that's common with Xeon E5 series processors. While the silicon physically packs eight CPU cores and 20 MB last-level cache (LLC, or L3 cache), client Core i7 processors are configured with only a maximum of six cores, and up to 15 MB L3 cache. According to a MyDrivers.com report, the maximum core count won't change with next-generation 22 nm Ivy Bridge-E Core i7 processors.

Ivy Bridge-E will be an upscale of Ivy Bridge. Similar to Sandy Bridge-E, the silicon will feature up to eight cores and 20 MB L3 cache. In its Core i7 avatar, however, the chip will be configured with no more than six cores, and no more than 15 MB L3 cache. The new chip will introduce IPC improvements, PCI-Express Gen 3.0 certified root complex (one which NVIDIA will approve of), higher CPU core clock speeds, and support for faster memory.

TDP could be the only reason Intel isn't willing to unlock cores 7 and 8 on client processors. Eight core, 20 MB LLC-laden Xeon E5 models based on today's 32 nm silicon, with 130W TDP, barely manage to scrape the 3.00 GHz mark. Given that, the prospects for Ivy Bridge-E client CPUs to run with all cores and LLC enabled, and yet deliver higher clock speeds than predecessors were always going to be low.

Intel Core i7 "Ivy Bridge-E" HEDT processors are compatible with existing socket LGA2011 motherboards (subject to BIOS update), and are slated for Q3-2013.Source: MyDrivers
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111 Comments on Top Intel Ivy Bridge-E Core Processors To Still Pack Six Cores

#1
TheHunter
by: drdeathx
Haswell is NOT on socket 2011. 1150 Fellas......
No one said its gonna be :), btw LGA1150 is mainstream Haswell 4core (8threads).


Haswell-E will be something LGA20xx for sure.
While it is expected to debut late next year the future platform for servers and supercomputers Grantley Intel, which will be available in 3 editions:

Grantley-EP server 4P (quad socket).
Grantley-EN 2P server (dual socket).
Grantley-E for desktop high-end.


The platform will consist Grantley Haswell-EP/EN/E microprocessors with chipsets Wellsburg future (based on Lynx Point ). Microprocessors based on micro-architecture Haswell will be made with the 22nm manufacturing process Intel’s Tri-Gate (Wellsburg and Lynx chipsets will be manufactured at 32nm Point) and incorporate vector instruction set AVX 2.0 .

Haswell-EP, the chief exponent based on the micro-architecture Haswell will have a total of 14 core x86 (shortened versions of the chip may have: 12, 10 and 8 cores enabled), each capable of processing 2 threads run through HyperThreading technology (up to 28 processing threads) and up to 35MB of L3 (2.5MB per core), also accompanied by a new memory controller DDR3-2133 integrated quad channel, 40-line integrated PCIe 3.0, and use the new socket R3 (successor to the socket LGA 2011).

Completing the Grantley-EP platform we have the new intel C601 “Wellsburg” (32nm), successor of the C600 chipset “Patsburg” (65nm), which has 10 ports support SATA-3 (Patsburg supports 2 SATA-3) , 6 USB 3.0 ports, 8 USB 2.0 ports, and also has 8 lines PCIe 2.0, for use in integrated chips or PCIe slots, support for dual-BIOS, and a TDP of just 7W (the TDP is 12W Patsburg .)
http://technewspedia.com/futurology-haswell-ep-will-have-14-cores-and-35mb-l3/
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#2
drdeathx
by: TheHunter
No one said its gonna be :), btw LGA1150 is mainstream Haswell 4core (8threads).


Haswell-E will be something LGA20xx for sure.





http://technewspedia.com/futurology-haswell-ep-will-have-14-cores-and-35mb-l3/
If you also read thread he said Haswell NOT Haswell E, thus my reply.

Ya sure about that LGA20XX, try socket R3. Rumor has it LGA2011 will be replaced so your for sure thing is not for sure as stated in your quote.
Posted on Reply
#3
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
Haswell E: LGA 2013, 16 cores, 32 threads, 4GHz clock speed, awesome performance, reasonable price! :rockout:

Ok, I'll stop dreaming now. :p
Posted on Reply
#4
drdeathx
by: qubit
Haswell E: LGA 2013, 16 cores, 32 threads, 4GHz clock speed, awesome performance, reasonable price! :rockout:

Ok, I'll stop dreaming now. :p
I haven't seen anything official but LGA2013 would make sense.
Posted on Reply
#5
radrok
by: qubit
Haswell E: LGA 2013, 16 cores, 32 threads, 4GHz clock speed, awesome performance, reasonable price! :rockout:

Ok, I'll stop dreaming now. :p
I'd be happy enough just with a double QPI X edition :O
Posted on Reply
#6
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
by: drdeathx
I haven't seen anything official but LGA2013 would make sense.
I was making up all those specs as just a bit of wishful thinking, especially that reasonable price. :) I have no idea what socket it will be on.
Posted on Reply
#7
Inceptor
by: radrok
If they are so concerned about TDP they should just release an unlocked 8 core CPU that meets the 130W target by having lower clocks.

I am so disappointed Intel, really, it seems we are going backwards instead of progressing.
Why would they release an 8 core i7 for, let's say, $1500, if they can market an 8 core Xeon for much more than that? Why waste the best cpu dies on an enthusiast/barely entry level workstation market when they can soak up a lot more profit from corporate/government/institutional customers?
Posted on Reply
#8
radrok
by: Inceptor
Why would they release an 8 core i7 for, let's say, $1500, if they can market an 8 core Xeon for much more than that? Why waste the best cpu dies on an enthusiast/barely entry level workstation market when they can soak up a lot more profit from corporate/government/institutional customers?
Agreed, then give me unlocked high end Xeons, fair enough?

I'd probably buy a 2687w if it was unlocked.
Posted on Reply
#9
TheHunter
by: drdeathx
If you also read thread he said Haswell NOT Haswell E, thus my reply.

Ya sure about that LGA20XX, try socket R3. Rumor has it LGA2011 will be replaced so your for sure thing is not for sure as stated in your quote.
Who he? Anyhow it doesnt matter..



LGA 2011, also called Socket R, is a CPU socket by Intel.

From wiki, thus this new Haswell-E is still LGA20xx ;)
Posted on Reply
#10
drdeathx
by: TheHunter
Who he? Anyhow it doesnt matter..



LGA 2011, also called Socket R, is a CPU socket by Intel.

From wiki, thus this new Haswell-E is still LGA20xx ;)
I love people who love to argue. Nothing is official from intel.... Not sayin that it wont be called 2013......
Posted on Reply
#11
geraintwd
I'm currently considering purchasing (in the next 3 months) a Sandy Bridge E 3820 quad core CPU along with an ASRock X79 Extreme 11 board (the ability to quad-SLI at x16/x16/x16/x16 was a big factor in this choice :D ) to replace my current AMD platform (Phenom II X4 965 BE).

My intention is to eventually replace the SB-E chip with an IB-E later on, so that I don't need to replace the mobo. Given that the primary use for my PC is gaming, 4 cores are quite sufficient for my needs, so the fact that the IB-E chips will ship with 6 isn't a problem for me. Until games start taking advantage of more than 6 cores, there's no point me worrying about Intel disabling the extra 2.

I'm also not too bothered about the longevity of the Socket 2011, if I can swap out the 3820 and drop an IB-E in there later on, I'll be happy. I've never upgraded just the CPU in any machine I've built - I've always replaced the mobo as well, so actually getting 2 CPU upgrades without having to swap out the rest of the system will be good for me.

My question to you clever chaps is this: am I barking up the wrong tree with my plans above? I want a mobo that will give me the best possible performance from my graphics hardware (currently a pair of GTX680s) and I want a CPU that favours raw clock speed over lots of cores, since that's what's going to give me the smoothest framerates. Are there better ways to do this (or cheaper ways?), would I benefit from looking at a different platform?

Interested to know your thoughts. Thanks.
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