Tuesday, November 6th 2012

NVIDIA Delivers Massive Performance Boost to Linux Gaming

NVIDIA today announced the latest NVIDIA GeForce drivers -- R310 -- double the performance and dramatically reduce game loading times for those gaming on the Linux operating system.

The result of almost a year of development by NVIDIA, Valve and other game developers, the new GeForce R310 drivers are designed to give GeForce customers the best possible Linux-based PC gaming experience -- and showcase the enormous potential of the world's biggest open-source operating system.

Available for download at www.geforce.com, the new R310 drivers were also thoroughly tested with Steam for Linux, the extension of Valve's phenomenally popular Steam gaming platform that officially opened to gamers starting today.

"With this release, NVIDIA has managed to increase the overall gaming performance under Linux," said Doug Lombardi, vice president of marketing at Valve. "NVIDIA took an unquestioned leadership position developing R310 drivers with us and other studios to provide an absolutely unequalled solution for Linux gamers."

The R310 drivers support the newest GeForce GTX 600 series GPUs, which have redefined gaming for desktop and notebook PCs by combining revolutionary performance and gaming technology features with an incredibly power-efficient design. Gamers with previous generation GeForce GPUs, including the 8800 GT and above, are encouraged to download these new drivers as well.

For an up-to-date third-party listing of games and applications that are currently in development for Linux, visit the Marlamin site.
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50 Comments on NVIDIA Delivers Massive Performance Boost to Linux Gaming

#1
TheMailMan78
Banstick Dummy
I guess we know what the Steambox will be running when it comes to the GPU.
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#2
deleted
Don't buy from Nvidia, enemy of your freedoms.
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#3
Crap Daddy
I like these words: "unquestioned leadership" "unequalled solution" "double the performance"
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#4
InnocentCriminal
Resident Grammar Amender
Nice!

I hope AMD pull their finger out because of this. They've never (really) had decent Linux drivers.
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#5
TheGuruStud
by: InnocentCriminal
Nice!

I hope AMD pull their finger out because of this. They've never (really) had decent Linux drivers.
Neither does nvidia :laugh:
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#6
Covert_Death
im just hoping gaming picks up on linux so it can be realized as a great OS and more common
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#9
radrok
Well I hope this trend goes on and AMD/ATI follows because I won't adopt Windows 8 if they do not change some things.

It's good to have a choice, especially if Linux is one of those choices.
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#10
aayman_farzand
When can we see huge performance improving Windows drivers. 12.11 did wonder for AMD, waiting on Nvidia to bring something close to that.
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#11
phanbuey
by: TheGuruStud
Neither does nvidia :laugh:
they do now


by: aayman_farzand
When can we see huge performance improving Windows drivers. 12.11 did wonder for AMD, waiting on Nvidia to bring something close to that.
You would be waiting for a while. A huge improvement means that your drivers kind of sucked to begin with, and you made them better. If NV's drivers are already good, then there is not that much room to bring such a huge boost.
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#12
MxPhenom 216
Corsair Fanboy
Linux is fine and everything, but its not for everyone. I really hate this push to gaming on it. Id rather just use windows and play my game. Not have to have a degree in programming to figure it out.

I think its ridiculous on how some Linux versions you have to recompile your kernal after doing driver installs for it to work right.
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#13
aayman_farzand
by: phanbuey

You would be waiting for a while. A huge improvement means that your drivers kind of sucked to begin with, and you made them better. If NV's drivers are already good, then there is not that much room to bring such a huge boost.
Nah it's not like I'm expecting for 50% increase. Drivers aren't THAT bad :P. Minimum 10% like 12.11 should be doable, especially in SLI where GPU usage isn't always high but FPS drops randomly.
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#14
Covert_Death
by: MxPhenom 216
Linux is fine and everything, but its not for everyone. I really hate this push to gaming on it. Id rather just use windows and play my game. Not have to have a degree in programming to figure it out.

I think its ridiculous on how some Linux versions you have to recompile your kernal after doing driver installs for it to work right.
what you aren't recognizing though is that if a large gamer adoption of linux takes place there will be greater support for the "simplified" functionality of linux... people will want it to be intuitive like windows and greater support for the OS will help it get there
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#15
Solaris17
Creator Solaris Utility DVD
by: MxPhenom 216
Linux is fine and everything, but its not for everyone. I really hate this push to gaming on it. Id rather just use windows and play my game. Not have to have a degree in programming to figure it out.

I think its ridiculous on how some Linux versions you have to recompile your kernal after doing driver installs for it to work right.
im glad they are this is a huge leap forward and exactly what linux needed. you dont need a degree in programming and compiling a kernal if you know how is pretty much the most fantastic thing in the universe. imagine your OS built around your PC lighter faster stronger better stability and uptime.
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#16
MxPhenom 216
Corsair Fanboy
by: Solaris17
im glad they are this is a huge leap forward and exactly what linux needed. you dont need a degree in programming and compiling a kernal if you know how is pretty much the most fantastic thing in the universe. imagine your OS built around your PC lighter faster stronger better stability and uptime.
Ill take that with a grain of salt.
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#17
TheMailMan78
Banstick Dummy
by: Solaris17
im glad they are this is a huge leap forward and exactly what linux needed. you dont need a degree in programming and compiling a kernal if you know how is pretty much the most fantastic thing in the universe. imagine your OS built around your PC lighter faster stronger better stability and uptime.
I tried Linux a month or so ago (Mint) and they have a LONG way to go before its ready for the masses. Took me a day to figure out how to confirm the firewall was on.

Granted I did have a lot of fun learning something new but, its not for noobs like me and definitely not for the masses.........yet.
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#18
MxPhenom 216
Corsair Fanboy
by: TheMailMan78
I tried Linux a month or so ago (Mint) and they have a LONG way to go before its ready for the masses. Took me a day to figure out how to confirm the firewall was on.

Granted I did have a lot of fun learning something new but, its not for noobs like me and definitely not for the masses.........yet.
Exactly, At work I have to work on solaris machines and Linux, and its a pain in the ass!
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#19
Solaris17
Creator Solaris Utility DVD
by: TheMailMan78
I tried Linux a month or so ago (Mint) and they have a LONG way to go before its ready for the masses. Took me a day to figure out how to confirm the firewall was on.

Granted I did have a lot of fun learning something new but, its not for noobs like me and definitely not for the masses.........yet.
thats because its linux mint. to each their own i suppose.
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#20
TheMailMan78
Banstick Dummy
by: Solaris17
thats because its linux mint. to each their own i suppose.
That's what was recommended to me as being the most simple. I aint gonna argue with you or anyone else about it. I'm very ignorant of the platform. I was just stating my limited personal experience that's all. :toast:
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#21
MicroUnC
Installing Now

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:xorg-edgers/ppa
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install nvidia-current nvidia-settings

:D :D :D
Posted on Reply
#22
TheMailMan78
Banstick Dummy
by: MicroUnC
Installing Now

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:xorg-edgers/ppa
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install nvidia-current nvidia-settings

:D :D :D
You see!!! WTF DOES THAT EVEN MEAN! :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#23
brandonwh64
Addicted to Bacon and StarCrunches!!!
by: TheMailMan78
You see!!! WTF DOES THAT EVEN MEAN! :laugh:
Its quite confusing to me too but I think if someone used linux there whole lives and tried to use CMD prompt (MSDOS even though its almost completely butchered now) it would be just as confusing.
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#24
Fourstaff
Quite a few of my friends uses Ubuntu, they seem pretty "usable" to me. You certainly don't need a computer science degree to use it (one of them studied Biomedical Science).
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#25
devguy
by: TheMailMan78
You see!!! WTF DOES THAT EVEN MEAN! :laugh:
Haha, some of us like the quickest way possible of doing certain tasks in Linux, which means entering them in a terminal window. All those things he did can be accomplished using a full, easy-to-use gui in the Ubuntu Software Center.

Granted, for now you'd have to know the name of the repository he listed, but once Canonical puts the new nVidia binary driver in their repositories, all you'll need to do is just click on the thing that says "install drivers", select everything it suggests, and click install. In Windows, it's actually more complicated, as you have to go to the manufacturer's website, navigate through to download the proper drivers (assuming you know your card's model number), find the executable, and go through an install setup.
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