Thursday, November 8th 2012

ASUS Intros GeForce GTX 680 4GB with Dual-Slot DirectCU II Cooler

ASUS slipped in a new high end GeForce GTX 680 graphics card, the GTX680-DC2-4GD5, which features a dual-slot DirectCU II cooler, and 4 GB of memory. The company's DirectCU series lineup for the GTX 680, till date, only included triple-slot cooling solutions. The dual-slot cooler has been extensively used by ASUS on several performance-segment GPUs. The card ships with NVIDIA-reference clock speeds of 1006 MHz base, 1058 MHz GPU Boost, and 6008 MHz (GDDR5-effective) memory. The card features memory chips on either sides of the PCB, and so an aluminum back-plate comes pre-installed. Expect the card to be priced around US $520. A variant called GTX680-DC2G-4GD5 is available, which packs a game bundle that includes Assassin's Creed III, I Am Alive, R.U.S.E, Splinter Cell: Conviction, and Rainbow Six Vegas 2. Its price is unknown.
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30 Comments on ASUS Intros GeForce GTX 680 4GB with Dual-Slot DirectCU II Cooler

#1
jihadjoe
by: eidairaman1
NV told EVGA to remove their EVBOT!

http://www.techpowerup.com/173110/NVIDIA-Forces-EVGA-to-Pull-EVBot-Support-from-GTX-680-Classified.html
That they did. But EVGA could have kept EVBOT if they were willing to shoulder their own RMA.
AnandTech Forums: Nvidia Response to 600-series overvoling
We support overvoltaging up to a limit on our products, but have a maximum reliability spec that is intended to protect the life of the product. We don’t want to see customers disappointed when their card dies in a year or two because the voltage was raised too high.

Regarding overvoltaging above our max spec, we offer AICs two choices:

· Ensure the GPU stays within our operating specs and have a full warranty from NVIDIA.

· Allow the GPU to be manually operated outside specs in which case NVIDIA provides no warranty.

We prefer AICs ensure the GPU stays within spec and encourage this through warranty support, but it’s ultimately up to the AIC what they want to do. Their choice does not affect allocation. And this has no bearing on the end user warranty provided by the AIC. It is simply a warranty between NVIDIA and the AIC.
With regards to your MSI comment below, we gave MSI the same choice I referenced above -- change their SW to disable OV above our reliability limit or not obtain a warranty. They simply chose to change their software in lieu of the warranty. Their choice. It is not ours to make, and we don’t influence them one way or the other.
The conclusion I come to here is that MSI and EVGA were offering out-of-spec overvolting on their Lightning and Classified lines, and they wanted NVIDIA to still handle RMAs on those cards; or conversely, MSI and EVGA aren't willing to put their money behind their products.
Posted on Reply
#2
Vlada011
What is your thinking about NVIDIA move and decide to ask for EVBOOT remove??? Why they do that, I hope it's not sensitive Kepler GK104.
MSI GTX680 Lightening have LN2 BIOS too but I'm not sure it's same like voltage increase with EVBoot.
I don't know voltage limit on both cards. My thinking is best possible options is solder new
GTX680 4GB Classified with new memory. With boot increase EVGA try to compensate maybe voltage limit. If something like that is possibile.
Bigger boost on Kepler is everything I think.
But mix of that two will be perfect.
GTX680 is for me better than HD7970. But GTX580 Classified is model what I like.
No doubt not only now, last two-three years Classified/Lightening models are far better than other, special Fermi Lightening Extreme, Classified.
But I like closed cards.
Posted on Reply
#3
Dj-ElectriC
Uh... sure...

Well, NVIDIA is the one who decide stuff about their own chips. No one can argue with them about it.
If NVIDIA say that all kepler chips will include the stupid turbo boost - they all will
Same goes for a cap of 1.175v on Vcore. MSI Lightning had the option to go even beyond 1.4v but nope, NVIDIA didn't want that to happend so they capped it in later revisions.

Thanks a bunch NVIDIA, for really respecting your AIB's and users.
Posted on Reply
#4
radrok
by: Dj-ElectriC
Uh... sure...

Well, NVIDIA is the one who decide stuff about their own chips. No one can argue with them about it.
If NVIDIA say that all kepler chips will include the stupid turbo boost - they all will
Same goes for a cap of 1.175v on Vcore. MSI Lightning had the option to go even beyond 1.4v but nope, NVIDIA didn't want that to happend so they capped it in later revisions.

Thanks a bunch NVIDIA, for really respecting your AIB's and users.
It's a shame because Kepler is such a good clocking chip... I bet you've seen the results on OCN/[H] threads about it. People getting 1420+ MHz core clock... insane.
Posted on Reply
#5
Vlada011
You mean 1420+ MHz on AIR cooling???
If someone pull 2100MHz from Kepler Classified GK104 can't be bad overclocker.
It's almost double shaders during overclocking on LN2. Amazing.
I like balance between good OC and double memory on card, double phases and card must be similar to stock.
Posted on Reply