Thursday, November 29th 2012

Windows 8 Gets Off To a Slow Start, According to The NPD Group

The consumer Windows PC and tablet market didn't get the boost it needed from the launch of Microsoft's Windows 8 in the U.S. Since the Windows 8 launch on October 26, Windows device sales have fallen 21 percent versus the same period last year, according to leading market research company The NPD Group's Weekly Tracking Service. Notebooks, which have been weak throughout most of 2012, saw that trend continue as they fell 24 percent. Desktop sales have fared better this year, dropping just 9 percent.

"After just four weeks on the market, it's still early to place blame on Windows 8 for the ongoing weakness in the PC market," said Stephen Baker, vice president of industry analysis at NPD. "We still have the whole holiday selling season ahead of us, but clearly Windows 8 did not prove to be the impetus for a sales turnaround some had hoped for."

Since its launch, Windows 8 has captured just over half (58 percent) of Windows computing device unit sales, compared to the 83 percent Windows 7 accounted for four weeks after that launch. Windows 8 tablet sales have been almost non-existent, with unit sales representing less than 1 percent of all Windows 8 device sales to date.

"The bad Back-to-School period left a lot of inventory in the channel, which had a real impact on the initial sell-through rates for Windows 8," said Baker. "The strong performance of Windows 8 notebooks with touchscreens, where Windows 8 truly shines, offers some reason for optimism. These products accounted for 6 percent of Windows 8 notebook sales at an average price of $867 helping to re-establish a premium segment to the Windows consumer notebook market."

Average selling prices of Windows computing devices have jumped significantly this year. Last year, overall ASP was $433 while this year's ASP over the past four weeks has risen to $477. Windows 8 notebooks have seen a nearly $80 rise in selling prices versus the prior year, propelled by the aforementioned strong performance of touchscreen devices and a solid uptick in the pricing on mainstream notebooks. Windows 8 desktop ASPs were also strong with selling prices up nearly 10 percent, driven by the same factors as notebook sales.
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39 Comments on Windows 8 Gets Off To a Slow Start, According to The NPD Group

#1
TheMailMan78
Big Member
NDP doesnt cover digital downloads. Never has.

If you go by their numbers, PC gaming died 10 years ago. NDP is kinda useless anymore.
Posted on Reply
#2
TheMailMan78
Big Member
Tell me how you can digitally download a laptop or desktop. Their numbers are useless for software sales numbers, but we're talking hardware here.
Because most hardware shipped with windows 7 with the option to digitally upgrade to windows 8. So these numbers are not really representive of who bought a new device and later used the grace period to upgrade to windows 8. For example a lot of stores were still selling windows 7 after windows 8 came out where when windows 7 came out most had it pre-installed. NDP is not looking at over all sales. Just devices that had windows 8 pre-installed.

EDIT?: Where did you post go Newtek??
Posted on Reply
#4
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
Since the Windows 8 launch on October 26, Windows device sales have fallen 21 percent versus the same period last year, according to leading market research company The NPD Group's Weekly Tracking Service. Notebooks, which have been weak throughout most of 2012, saw that trend continue as they fell 24 percent. Desktop sales have fared better this year, dropping just 9 percent.
That sounds to me like it is due to the crappy global economy, not necessarily Windows 8's fault. Desktops dropped less because they're substantially cheaper.
Posted on Reply
#5
lemonadesoda
The NPD Group is a market research data aggregating company. They are a business. This news is their best effort to get MS as their customer.

"Become our customer"... "pay the fees"... "share your internal data with us"... "we will then make this publicly available" xxxxxxxxx "but if you dont, we'll harm your efforts of trying to "up" your questionable OS"

Blackmail in another name if you ask me.
Posted on Reply
#6
digibucc
by: Dos101
We wouldn't want news to get out about Microsoft selling 40 million copies of Windows 8
that's easily possible when you sell what would normally cost $200 for $15-$40 depending on the deal you got. I don't even have it installed and likely won't on my main machine - but for $15 you bet I bought a license.

My only point is that number is not as impressive as it looks, because they sold it for way cheaper than normal AND it includes computers with windows 8 on them - and i don't know but could also possibly include licenses sold TO companies, and not just end users.
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#7
phanbuey
When are we just going to stop f***ing around and admit that a large percentage of the windows market, and all of the corporate clients, think that windows 8 is a piece of crap immediately upon using it?

Windows 8 is getting off to a slow start because it sucks. Steep learning curve, frustrating "change for the sake of change" interface, and sketchy support for legacy apps means its dead in the water for most computer users.
Posted on Reply
#8
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: phanbuey
When are we just going to stop f***ing around and admit that a large percentage of the windows market, and all of the corporate clients, think that windows 8 is a piece of crap immediately upon using it?

Windows 8 is getting off to a slow start because it sucks. Steep learning curve, frustrating "change for the sake of change" interface, and sketchy support for legacy apps means its dead in the water for most computer users.
But it's not slow. It's selling just as good as Windows 7 did.
Posted on Reply
#9
phanbuey
by: Frick
But it's not slow. It's selling just as good as Windows 7 did.
This:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/blog/2012/nov/19/apple-microsoft-steven-sinofsky
With this:

"Since its launch, Windows 8 has captured just over half (58 percent) of Windows computing device unit sales, compared to the 83 percent Windows 7 accounted for four weeks after that launch. Windows 8 tablet sales have been almost non-existent, with unit sales representing less than 1 percent of all Windows 8 device sales to date."

And the fact that every other IT dept I have contact with, and our software vendors are recommending to stay away from it, I would bet against.
Posted on Reply
#10
cadaveca
My name is Dave
by: phanbuey
And the fact that every other IT dept I have contact with, and our software vendors are recommending to stay away from it, I would bet against.
I read comments like that form IT guys to mean that they haven't the slightest idea how to support it, so need time to get familiar with it.


Heck, most IT places here are still running XP, and on boxes that are nearly 10 years old, if not more. My wife has probably one of the most advanced PCs at the hospital she works at...and it's not even a P55 chipset.


IT managers are NOT the people to ask about tech, at all, unfortunately. The hospital guys say what I do, review-wise, is too far above their heads for them to care about.


If these guys don't understand hardware I doubt they can understand software.
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#11
Jstn7477
I use Windows 8 fine for my home needs, but my parents have to use Windows 7 because Quickbooks Pro 2012 doesn't work properly and they are still certifying 2013 for Windows 8. Software vendors like Intuit probably aren't helping sales if they can't even finish certifying their latest software a month after Windows 8 was released, and they don't care about supporting older versions because they slap a new number on it and sell it again.
Posted on Reply
#12
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: phanbuey
This:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/blog/2012/nov/19/apple-microsoft-steven-sinofsky
With this:

"Since its launch, Windows 8 has captured just over half (58 percent) of Windows computing device unit sales, compared to the 83 percent Windows 7 accounted for four weeks after that launch. Windows 8 tablet sales have been almost non-existent, with unit sales representing less than 1 percent of all Windows 8 device sales to date."
That doesn't change the fact that the numbers are pretty good.
Posted on Reply
#13
digibucc
by: cadaveca

IT managers are NOT the people to ask about tech, at all, unfortunately. The hospital guys say what I do, review-wise, is too far above their heads for them to care about.


If these guys don't understand hardware I doubt they can understand software.
I have to agree with this. although i'm not a fan of 8 for my own reasons, heads of IT are rarely first adopters, and their opinions should be taken as such. their job is to keep a large organization as in sync as possible - not to update windows every chance they get.

I don't care how good your OS is, upgrading an entire company to it is a big job, and not one that should be (or is) taken lightly.
Posted on Reply
#14
cadaveca
My name is Dave
by: digibucc
I don't care how good your OS is, upgrading an entire company to it is a big job, and not one that should be (or is) taken lightly.
Exactly. Most will be doing qualification testing right now, if the business is big enough..others will want the change...others will say no to Win8 just to avoid having to work.
Posted on Reply
#15
Dos101
by: digibucc
that's easily possible when you sell what would normally cost $200 for $15-$40 depending on the deal you got. I don't even have it installed and likely won't on my main machine - but for $15 you bet I bought a license.

My only point is that number is not as impressive as it looks, because they sold it for way cheaper than normal AND it includes computers with windows 8 on them - and i don't know but could also possibly include licenses sold TO companies, and not just end users.
But why does that matter if it's cheaper? If people don't like they won't buy it, no matter how low the price is. The fact that Windows 8, a radical change in terms of the UI compared to previous versions of Windows, is keeping pace with Windows 7's initial sales is nothing short of amazing.

by: phanbuey
When are we just going to stop f***ing around and admit that a large percentage of the windows market, and all of the corporate clients, think that windows 8 is a piece of crap immediately upon using it?

Windows 8 is getting off to a slow start because it sucks. Steep learning curve, frustrating "change for the sake of change" interface, and sketchy support for legacy apps means its dead in the water for most computer users.
Who is "we"? I love how people can spout out generalizations without actually saying anything.

I work at a University and Microsoft reps have been around lately demoing Windows 8 devices in various locations to students. I've attended a few and saw nothing but positive reactions from people. Hell, even people in my department (though they are mostly IT people) who are anti-Windows find the UI pleasing.
Posted on Reply
#16
digibucc
by: Dos101
But why does that matter if it's cheaper? If people don't like they won't buy it, no matter how low the price is. The fact that Windows 8, a radical change in terms of the UI compared to previous versions of Windows, is keeping pace with Windows 7's initial sales is nothing short of amazing.
price doesn't matter? since when? I don't think you realize that there is a $185 difference between $200 and $15. How can you honestly try and say that selling the OS at LESS THAN 10% it's usual cost doesn't affect numbers? that is simply disingenuous imo.
Posted on Reply
#17
phanbuey
by: cadaveca
I read comments like that form IT guys to mean that they haven't the slightest idea how to support it, so need time to get familiar with it.


Heck, most IT places here are still running XP, and on boxes that are nearly 10 years old, if not more. My wife has probably one of the most advanced PCs at the hospital she works at...and it's not even a P55 chipset.


IT managers are NOT the people to ask about tech, at all, unfortunately. The hospital guys say what I do, review-wise, is too far above their heads for them to care about.


If these guys don't understand hardware I doubt they can understand software.
They might not be the guys to ask about tech, but they are the ones that cut the purchase orders to dell to order new machines for new users etc. And when that new machine comes with Windows 7 instead of 8, that slows sales.

When 7 came out, and even when XP came out, there was much less reluctance to adopt (read: order new equipment with it preinstalled) among conservative users (i.e. IT depts) than when ME, Vista, and now 8 arrived.

by: Dos101

Who is "we"? I love how people can spout out generalizations without actually saying anything.

I work at a University and Microsoft reps have been around lately demoing Windows 8 devices in various locations to students. I've attended a few and saw nothing but positive reactions from people. Hell, even people in my department (though they are mostly IT people) who are anti-Windows find the UI pleasing.
We as in the people who constantly make excuses for a software because we want it to work. And I say we because everyone has a tendency to deny that something that they want to be great just isn't. I'm glad you had fun at your tech demo. Did you buy a windows 8 device?

If you didn't, then you would be part of my 'we' as someone who went to the demo, wants to like the software, never actually used it for real, day to day work, and then went on the internet defending it.
Posted on Reply
#18
Snook
Taking the opinion of IT heads at large corporations for an OS that was just released is not advisable. As was said in a previous post their job is to keep the place they work at functioning, not on the cutting edge of technology

I work at a Hospital in the IT department there, not counting any personnel machines and servers we had ~5,000 systems to take care of in each of the hospitals under our name with a total of 5 hospitals, equaling about ~20,000 units.(tossing out our numerous off site and outpatient centers and any medical equipment running Windows as a base OS)

At the end of 2013 we are suppose to start a migration to Windows 7, right now the systems are all on Windows 2000. The migration is estimated to take about a year till completion.

Large corporations upgrade slowly, talking to them about Windows 8 is a horrible place to get opinions.
Posted on Reply
#19
brandonwh64
Addicted to Bacon and StarCrunches!!!
by: Snook
Taking the opinion of IT heads at large corporations for an OS that was just released is not advisable. As was said in a previous post their job is to keep the place they work at functioning, not on the cutting edge of technology

I work at a Hospital in the IT department there, not counting any personnel machines and servers we had ~5,000 systems to take care of in each of the hospitals under our name with a total of 5 hospitals, equaling about ~20,000 units.(tossing out our numerous off site and outpatient centers and any medical equipment running Windows as a base OS)

At the end of 2013 we are suppose to start a migration to Windows 7, right now the systems are all on Windows 2000. The migration is estimated to take about a year till completion.

Large corporations upgrade slowly, talking to them about Windows 8 is a horrible place to get opinions.
I agree with this! Our company is still on XP and says they WILL NOT upgrade anytime soon (Projected 2014'ish)
Posted on Reply
#20
AsRock
TPU addict
by: Frick
But it's not slow. It's selling just as good as Windows 7 did.
And i am sure windows 7 would of for $15 too never mind the other cheaper deal they been doing..

Maybe part of it more people wanted new electronics last year than this year like shit maybe people are pissed being told ya shits outa date every 6-12 months and thought wtf why do i need to change.

Maybe there is more people this year that cannot afford shit..

To me what ever sales they say win8 has done i will not take it as solid proof that the OS is any better than win7..
Posted on Reply
#21
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: TheMailMan78
Because most hardware shipped with windows 7 with the option to digitally upgrade to windows 8. So these numbers are not really representive of who bought a new device and later used the grace period to upgrade to windows 8. For example a lot of stores were still selling windows 7 after windows 8 came out where when windows 7 came out most had it pre-installed. NDP is not looking at over all sales. Just devices that had windows 8 pre-installed.

EDIT?: Where did you post go Newtek??
I deleted it because I was tired when I made the post and thought this article was only about Hardware shipped with Windows 8 installed. After I posted I realized it was about all of Windows 8, including the digital downloads of it, so I agreed with you then.
Posted on Reply
#22
Solidstate89
Even dismissing all of the other reasons I upgraded to Windows 8 - the entire switch was worth it just for the insanely improved file copy/move dialog box. I've been moving hundreds of gigabytes worth of movies and TV shows to my new NAS and that dialog box is such a lifesaver. Each mass move is treated as a separate instance and the ability to pause or delete them individually is such blessing.

I don't know what took them so damn long to finally modernize it, but I am so glad they finally did. It took them long enough but I am glad it's here.
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#23
Deadlyraver
I think W8 lacked first impression, as people ripped this OS before it even had a chance to present itself. On the week before the release, I already saw people buy Macbooks.
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#24
NC37
Heh, MS ready to blame PCs for lack of sales. Like we didn't see that coming.

Everyone saying it'll fail for one reason or another. While I agree with them a bit, I now say it'll fail because we don't get any OS-tans!

Its not fair! Japan gets special OS-tan marketing and we get boring boxes to match the boring UI!
Posted on Reply
#25
cyneater
Windows Vista was a steaming pile.
But for many people like myself it was better than windows XP-64bit and it added direct X10 support.

Windows 7 is awesome runs great pretty much a fixed version of windows Vista.

Windows 8 IMO is a backwards step. I really want to know what drugs they were smoking.
The gui is awful. Yes there is an icon called desktop but it’s the same as windows 7.
IMO windows 8 is a mobile phone os that has been forced up on the people.
Windows 8 is the fisher price os.
I can't find any new features that are cool or worthwhile. I actually felt sick when using windows 8.

I heard windows 9 logo is just 1 square!:P And the drop the S MS window :P

But each to their own.

Ever since XP I use the windows classic theme.
I even moved from Ubuntu because I though unity was an abomination ( it isn't compared to windows 8) to Lubuntu or LXDE because its light weight and gets the job done.

Ill keep windows 7 to play games and continue to dual boot.
If you think about it windows 8 makes sense from a profit point of view. As if you want a new computer with windows 7 you can’t get one. So many metro haters will just buy a console to make games.
this would be a perfect time for Valve to make a gaming linux distro .... hint hint ...

The artical should be called windows 8 gets off to a slow - tile ! :P
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