Tuesday, December 11th 2012

Intel Core "Haswell" Quad-Core Desktop CPU Lineup Detailed

2013 promises to be another year, with another new line of processors by Intel, and like every alternate year, the company will introduce a new client desktop CPU socket. With its 4th generation Core "Haswell" processor family, Intel will introduce a brand new CPU architecture that steps up IPC over current Core "Ivy Bridge," hence, Intel's Core desktop processor lineup will not ship with higher clock speeds, yet higher performance. The new chips will be built in the LGA1150 package, and will be accompanied by Intel's 8-series "Lynx Point" chipset.

By Q2-2013, Intel will have launched as many as 14 Core desktop CPU models, including six in the mainline, and eight power-optimized ones. Its nomenclature is somewhat similar to that of current Core "Ivy Bridge" lineup, except the 4000-series numbering. Leading the pack is the Core i7-4770K (unlocked) and i7-4770, clocked at 3.50 GHz with 3.90 GHz Turbo Boost, featuring eight threads with HyperThreading, 8 MB of L3 cache, Intel HD Graphics 4600 iGPU clocked up to 1250 MHz, with 84W TDP; followed by Core i5-4670K (unlocked) and i5-4670 clocked at 3.40 GHz with 3.80 GHz Turbo Boost, and 6 MB L3 cache. The Core i5-4570 and i5-4430 are clocked at 3.20 GHz (3.60 GHz Turbo) and 3.00 GHz (3.20 Turbo).

Intel's mainline Core desktop processor lineup is overshadowed by as many as eight energy-efficient processor models. The Core i7/i5 "S" series reduce TDP to 65W while maintaining clock speeds, while Core i7/i5 "T" series reduce TDP to 45W, with a little help from lower clock speeds.Source: VR-Zone
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64 Comments on Intel Core "Haswell" Quad-Core Desktop CPU Lineup Detailed

#1
Prima.Vera
Still rocking on a Core 2 Quad Q9650 and no plans to upgrade...hehe.
Posted on Reply
#2
acerace
by: Fourstaff
And the reason mainstream needs 6 cores is ... ?
Because he have no idea what's he is talking about. :slap:
Posted on Reply
#3
The Quim Reaper
by: Fourstaff
And the reason mainstream needs 6 cores is ... ?
5yrs ago people were asking why the need for 4 cores...
Posted on Reply
#4
Fourstaff
by: The Quim Reaper
5yrs ago people were asking why the need for 4 cores...
Come back in 5 years, every peasant and their cattle will have 6 cores, but for now 4 cores (with or without HT) is the king :)
Posted on Reply
#5
brandonwh64
Addicted to Bacon and StarCrunches!!!
AMD does have 6 and 8 cores but look at the multi threaded benches compared to a 3770K with HT. As you can see it still looses to a real quad core chip with 8 threads

http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/551?vs=697

So those "REAL CORES" don't do squat that HT could not do.
Posted on Reply
#6
Melvis
by: brandonwh64
AMD does have 6 and 8 cores but look at the multi threaded benches compared to a 3770K with HT. As you can see it still looses to a real quad core chip with 8 threads

http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/551?vs=697

So those "REAL CORES" don't do squat that HT could not do.
But = to a 2600K? meh so what? http://www.guru3d.com/articles_pages/amd_fx_8350_8320_6300_processor_4300_performance_review,1.html

On topic, the question realy is HOW much of an increase over the last gen? as ivy over sandy was nothing to write home about.
Posted on Reply
#7
Raw
Where would you buy a new 2500K for $100.00?

by: james888
I was thinking about getting a 3770k when they get cheap... You can get a 2500k for $100... I don't know, haswell looks tempting.
REALLY??
Where? I WANT ONE!

Where would you buy a new 2500K for $100.00?

They sell for $220.00 today on Newegg and $210.00 on Amazon, how about >$200.00 on EBay...that's a good represetation of current pricing anywhere in the world.

:cool:
Posted on Reply
#8
repman244
by: Melvis
On topic, the question realy is HOW much of an increase over the last gen? as ivy over sandy was nothing to write home about.
Ivy wasn't a new architecture.

It would be reasonable to expect ~10% increase, it could of been more since clocks stayed the same.
Posted on Reply
#9
TheLostSwede
by: Raw
REALLY??
Where? I WANT ONE!

Where would you buy a new 2500K for $100.00?

They sell for $220.00 today on Newegg and $210.00 on Amazon, how about >$200.00 on EBay...that's a good represetation of current pricing anywhere in the world.

:cool:
Microcenter in the US tend to offer silly deals on CPUs, mate of mine got a 3570K for $170 there a couple of weeks back...
I guess they're still going for $170 - http://www.microcenter.com/product/388577/Core_i5_3570K_34GHz_LGA_1155_Processor
No 2500K's on their website though...
Posted on Reply
#10
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
Now I want a 4770 and 4770's in Crossfire just for the sake of it. :D

Anyway, needs more cores. Not really, but it would be nice.
Posted on Reply
#11
3870x2
by: Novulux
Nah, even if AMD doesn't release any competing products soon after, Haswell will not be such an extreme increase in CPU performance that it won't have to compete with Intel's other CPUs. The fact is that Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge are fast enough for almost all purposes, and Intel would not endanger possible upgrades with exorbitant prices...hopefully.
AMD hasn't had a competing product since AMD Athlon 64, or almost a decade ago. The prices will be more slightly inflated than the last upgrade that we call the 3k series.

The good news is this is finally a viable upgrade from a 900 series i7. (for the non-enthusiast anyway)
Posted on Reply
#12
Dj-ElectriC
K CPUs dont get VT, why? becuase F@#k you thats why :D
Posted on Reply
#13
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: 3870x2
AMD hasn't had a competing product since AMD Athlon 64, or almost a decade ago. The prices will be more slightly inflated than the last upgrade that we call the 3k series.

The good news is this is finally a viable upgrade from a 900 series i7. (for the non-enthusiast anyway)
For normal folks there haven't been a viable upgrade since the Core 2 Duos. They are still more than enough for them.

And AMD is competing alright, just not at the high end. ;)

EDIT: I have a feeling I'm not doing the grammar well today.
Posted on Reply
#14
NHKS
haswell cores have similar clocks to ivb/sandy cores(eg: 4770K, 3770K & 2700K) so whatever performance improvement we are likely to see is purely architecture/ipc enhancements, which is always a good thing... this along with full SATA III support from the platform is tempting.. a factor that can hamper the interest in this platform is another price hike over IVB - i hope the prices atleast remain similar if not lower..

still not clear why 4770K will be rated 84W while 3770K is 77W.. and i thought haswell would have iGPU named GT1/2/3 (3 being full spec) rather than HD4600... and 4600=GT3?..

those low power models are really tempting for an always-on/crunching setup!
Posted on Reply
#15
Octavean
by: Raw
REALLY??
Where? I WANT ONE!

Where would you buy a new 2500K for $100.00?

They sell for $220.00 today on Newegg and $210.00 on Amazon, how about >$200.00 on EBay...that's a good represetation of current pricing anywhere in the world.

:cool:
It was a limited time offer at Microcenter:

Microcenter i5-2500k for $99.99 (today only 11/16/2012)

My concern with Intel at this point isn’t one of ridiculously high prices. Its more an issue of focus and goals. With little to no competition form AMD and ARM becoming more and more relevant every day, I suspect Intel will focus on efficiency increases more so then performance increases. The shift to mobile computing makes this even more likely IMO.

I personally want to see “significant” performance increases on desktop class processors. If I don’t see that then I’m fine with what I have until such time as said performance increases are made apparent.
Posted on Reply
#16
chodaboy19
by: Dj-ElectriC
K CPUs dont get VT, why? becuase F@#k you thats why :D
That is unfortunate, I was expecting VT-d and AES. Sandy bridge and Ivy Bridge both have AES at least.
Posted on Reply
#18
Harry Lloyd
Wow, what a fail. Exactly the same clocks. What is the point of these CPUs? The tick-tock is now completely pointless. Same clocks, same number of cores, and a 10% architecture performance boost? What a waste of money for whoever upgrades from Sandy or Ivy, especially considering a new mobo is needed.

Unfortunately this is AMD's fault. Intel can do whatever they want without competition.
Posted on Reply
#19
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: LAN_deRf_HA
Check out the 4765T. Full spec in a 35w package.
I think the 4770T is more interesting since it has a boost clock that is still respectable and still keeps it under 45w.

by: Dj-ElectriC
K CPUs dont get VT, why? becuase F@#k you thats why :D
The K series have VT, they don't have VT-d which is just direct I/O. People who really want VT-d don't overclock so they have no reason to buy K series processors.

by: chodaboy19
That is unfortunate, I was expecting VT-d and AES. Sandy bridge and Ivy Bridge both have AES at least.
The K series processors do have AES, and as I said, people that actually use VT-d don't overclock so paying extra for the K processor doesn't make sense anyway.
Posted on Reply
#20
Covert_Death
by: The Quim Reaper
Still only 4 cores for the mainstream...:rolleyes:

Thanks AMD, thanks for being so useless as to provide Intel with absolutely no reason whatsoever to push 6 cores into the mainstream in 2013.

Thanks AMD...:rolleyes:
yea blame AMD cause that's the fun thing to do :rolleyes:

if your going to blame someone blame the software and game companies out there that still live in the 90's and refuse to code for 4+ Cores still... yes it's a littler harder to do but damn get with the times it's what NEEDS to be done
Posted on Reply
#21
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: LAN_deRf_HA
That's weird. Makes it essentially a far more minor change than people were anticipating. So much for the promise of cheaper small boards.
In its own way, it's a major change. You won't find Gigabyte or ASUS vomit copious amounts of chokes/pseudo-phases around their sockets, because there are only so many phases the CPU-integrated controller logic can handle.
Posted on Reply
#22
lemonadesoda
Interesting. Intel DONT WANT overclocked servers/workstations.
Posted on Reply
#23
Fourstaff
by: lemonadesoda
Interesting. Intel DONT WANT overclocked servers/workstations.
Or course not, since its going to reduce their profits.
Posted on Reply
#24
Covert_Death
by: Octavean
It was a limited time offer at Microcenter:

Microcenter i5-2500k for $99.99 (today only 11/16/2012)

My concern with Intel at this point isn’t one of ridiculously high prices. Its more an issue of focus and goals. With little to no competition form AMD and ARM becoming more and more relevant every day, I suspect Intel will focus on efficiency increases more so then performance increases. The shift to mobile computing makes this even more likely IMO.

I personally want to see “significant” performance increases on desktop class processors. If I don’t see that then I’m fine with what I have until such time as said performance increases are made apparent.
I didn't even know I had one of these stores ~30 minutes from me... i know where i'm going next week!
http://www.microcenter.com/product/388577/Core_i5_3570K_34GHz_LGA_1155_Processor
Posted on Reply
#25
Octavean
by: newtekie1
I think the 4770T is more interesting since it has a boost clock that is still respectable and still keeps it under 45w.



The K series have VT, they don't have VT-d which is just direct I/O. People who really want VT-d don't overclock so they have no reason to buy K series processors.



The K series processors do have AES, and as I said, people that actually use VT-d don't overclock so paying extra for the K processor doesn't make sense anyway.
Not so sure that is 100% accurate in all cases:

Intel Fixes VT-d Bug in Sandy Bridge-E CPUs

http://ark.intel.com/products/70845/Intel-Core-i7-3970X-Processor-Extreme-Edition-15M-Cache-3_50-GHz

So apparently there are “K” series processors with VT-d support,….

***edit***

Even the Sandy Bridge-E Core i7 3820 has VT-d support and while not an unlocked "K" series part it can still be OCed:

http://ark.intel.com/products/63698
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