Friday, January 11th 2013

BenQ Introduces New RL2455HM Gaming Monitor With Blazing-Fast Response Time

BenQ America Corp., an internationally renowned provider of digital lifestyle innovations, today announced the expansion of its RL Series of professional gaming monitors with the launch of the new RL2455HM.

Built on the advanced technology of the RL2450HT - featured on the Major League Gaming (MLG) 2012 championship circuit - the RL2455HM has been enhanced thanks to feedback directly from the gaming community. Gamers now get a blazing-fast 1-ms GTG response time, 2-watt stereo speakers, and dual HDMI ports for the ultimate in connectivity and control. The monitor also comes packed with advanced custom settings, such as BenQ's Black eQualizer, Display Mode, and Smart Scaling to give players an edge over their opponents.


"As the official MLG gaming monitor sponsor, players relied on our RL2450HT to deliver unprecedented levels of accuracy and control in a number of tournaments across the U.S.," said Bob Wudeck, Director of Retail and e-Commerce at BenQ America Corp. "With the RL2455HM, we've taken all the advanced technologies of the RL2450HT, incorporated feedback from MLG pros, and created a powerful gaming monitor. Now home gamers can get the same experience as the pros, enabling an entirely new level of player performance."

Designed specifically for console gaming, users get the ultimate experience for fast-paced first-person shooter (FPS) games such as the new Halo 4 and Call of Duty: Black Ops 2, and popular fighting games like Mortal Kombat with an ultra-low input lag that renders action without ghosting or latency from mouse motion. The monitor's dual HDMI ports provide full HD connectivity with PCs, cameras, Blu-ray players, and more, allowing users to enjoy their digital A/V entertainment effortlessly. The RL2455HM also features a 60 Hz refresh rate tuned to match console video output for seamless connectivity, a 24-inch widescreen (16:9) full HD LED screen, LED backlighting for great color and low power consumption, and a 12 million to 1 contrast ratio for the best in picture quality.

To give players a competitive edge, the RL2455HM features BenQ's Black eQualizer to enable total visibility by allowing gamers to adjust the screen brightness without over-exposing white levels - revealing critical combat details with improved visibility in darkened areas. To accommodate individual viewing preferences, a Display Mode allows gamers to switch between seven monitor screen sizes while the Smart Scaling feature gives players the ability to scale the screen on-the-fly to virtually any custom size - ranging from a 24-inch 1080p display to a traditional 17-inch 4:3 format — without impacting controller sensitivity. The monitor provides custom settings for color enhancement, and features 2-watt internal stereo speakers.

The new RL2455HM gaming monitor will be available in March 2013 at an MSRP of $229. Information on the full line of BenQ gaming monitors is available at gaming.benq.com.
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29 Comments on BenQ Introduces New RL2455HM Gaming Monitor With Blazing-Fast Response Time

#1
Em3xus
Pshhh

"Designed specifically for console gaming"
"ultra-low input lag that renders action without ghosting or latency from mouse motion"

HNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
Posted on Reply
#2
Covert_Death
I think they are just saying it works well with either consoles or PC....

being a PC monitor the ghosting is important since you can turn a lot faster than consoles.

but it also has built in speakers so this is most likely what they mean by designed specifically for console gaming...
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#3
Katanai
Gaming monitor you say? Blazing-Fast response time you say? Good! 60 fucking Hz?!? GTFO with that POS!
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#4
lemonadesoda
I do wish TPU would shove all this "low end crap" news to GN or NPU.
Posted on Reply
#5
fusionblu
I really would like to think that this might lead to BenQ making a better upgrade of my current monitor, but I can't over look the fact that this is 60Hz opposed to 120Hz that my current monitor has and that I feel that they made this monitor by extracting technology from the same model of monitor as mine (and that there is one model above mine so I have the slightly older monitor here) by halving the frequency to get a faster response time. Put simply this does not impress me.
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#6
happita
I can't imagine it being that hard to put LED, 120hz, IPS, and low response time into a monitor that can handle it.

This is 2013 BenQ, get with the program...120hz minimun spec or gtfo!!


The industry also needs to upgrade the HDMI spec so that it can actually handle 120hz instead of just dual-link DVI being able to, I hate having only 1 choice.
Posted on Reply
#7
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: lemonadesoda
I do wish TPU would shove all this "low end crap" news to GN or NPU.
I do wish TPUers wouldn't get rageboners when confronted with "low end crap". Low end is the best end.
Posted on Reply
#8
techtard
by: happita
I can't imagine it being that hard to put LED, 120hz, IPS, and low response time into a monitor that can handle it.

This is 2013 BenQ, get with the program...120hz minimun spec or gtfo!!


The industry also needs to upgrade the HDMI spec so that it can actually handle 120hz instead of just dual-link DVI being able to, I hate having only 1 choice.
If it's so easy, start up a display company.
Posted on Reply
#9
Mistral
Yes, techtard, it's easy, the tech is already there. Fork up the venture capital and I'll have 1440p 96Hz DisplayPort monitors ready for you in half an year. You'll be able to watch The Hobbit in Double-HFR and SUper-3D!
Posted on Reply
#10
happita
by: techtard
If it's so easy, start up a display company.
The display industry has been stagnant for a while and nobody can deny that. 1080p resolution has been around for a very long time without too many advances. So yes, they can provide all the goods, it's just a matter of when they want to release it because it is purely a business decision, not a technological one. "Milking" consumers is how they make their money.
Posted on Reply
#11
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
A "gaming" monitor that doesn't support 120Hz and LightBoost?

Yeah, sure. :laugh:

LightBoost eliminates all motion blur and makes a 120Hz monitor a killer gaming device way better than the old CRTs which were way better than any regular LCD monitor for gaming. See that link to see why.

Still, it's got a couple of nice features.
Posted on Reply
#12
Katanai
by: qubit
A "gaming" monitor that doesn't support 120Hz and LightBoost?

Yeah, sure. :laugh:

LightBoost eliminates all motion blur and makes a 120Hz monitor a killer gaming device way better than the old CRTs which were way better than any regular LCD monitor for gaming. See that link to see why.

Still, it's got a couple of nice features.
Good find man! Someone needs to contact Nvidia about this. It would be extremely easy for them to make an option in the driver so this turns on only when a game starts. I see no reason for it to be on while web surfing for example. I actually like the fact that the picture is static while reading text. That's the main reason why LCD screens are easier on the eye than CRT. With the game profiles and everything they have now in the driver it would be no hassle at all to implement an option called LightBoost 2D that when it's turned on starts LightBoost as soon as a game or full screen video starts and leaves it off for other tasks...
Posted on Reply
#13
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
by: Katanai
Good find man! Someone needs to contact Nvidia about this. It would be extremely easy for them to make an option in the driver so this turns on only when a game starts. I see no reason for it to be on while web surfing for example. I actually like the fact that the picture is static while reading text. That's the main reason why LCD screens are easier on the eye than CRT. With the game profiles and everything they have now in the driver it would be no hassle at all to implement an option called LightBoost 2D that when it's turned on starts LightBoost as soon as a game or full screen video starts and leaves it off for other tasks...
Yeah, I discovered this about a month after buying my Asus VG278HE and fiddling with the driver options.

Thing is, the strobing effect of LB is also great for the desktop, since it elminates motion blur when moving windows around, or watching video, too. There's no flicker or eyestrain either, because it's flashing at 120Hz. Hence, I leave LB on the whole time now.

We really need a generic industry standard version of this which can be turned on or off at the monitor, independently of any graphics card manufacturer.
Posted on Reply
#14
lemonadesoda
by: Frick
I do wish TPUers wouldn't get rageboners when confronted with "low end crap". Low end is the best end.
I do wish lowest-common-denominators would understand that steak eaters don't like being fed cheap hamburgers. ;) High end is the exciting end.
Posted on Reply
#15
Katanai
by: qubit
Yeah, I discovered this about a month after buying my Asus VG278HE and fiddling with the driver options.

Thing is, the strobing effect of LB is also great for the desktop, since it elminates motion blur when moving windows around, or watching video, too. There's no flicker or eyestrain either, because it's flashing at 120Hz. Hence, I leave LB on the whole time now.

We really need a generic industry standard version of this which can be turned on or off at the monitor, independently of any graphics card manufacturer.
There is less of it that's why you don't notice it. Still, for reading text there's nothing better than a static picture. That's what eink technology is all about. As I said it would be really easy for Nvidia to implement this as an extra option in the driver. All they need is already there. Why not contact them about this?

by: qubit

We really need a generic industry standard version of this which can be turned on or off at the monitor, independently of any graphics card manufacturer.
If that's what you think would be better try and contact Asus then. There really isn't any company better suited for that other than Intel...
Posted on Reply
#16
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: lemonadesoda
I do wish lowest-common-denominators would understand that steak eaters don't like being fed cheap hamburgers. ;) High end is the exciting end.
I do wish steak eaters would have the intelligence to stay away from stuff they don't like.
Posted on Reply
#17
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
by: Katanai
There is less of it that's why you don't notice it. Still, for reading text there's nothing better than a static picture. That's what eink technology is all about. As I said it would be really easy for Nvidia to implement this as an extra option in the driver. All they need is already there. Why not contact them about this?
Have you actually seen LightBoost on the desktop? No? Then you have no idea. It strobes so fast (120Hz) that it doesn't get in the way at all while providing the benefits I described. Come back to me when you've seen it for yourself and can speak from experience.

NVIDIA's engineers who designed LB will already know about all this. It's odd that they don't play up this feature as a major selling point and any single user contacting NVIDIA about it will fall on dead ears. Like any big organization they'll simply ignore it or give some useless boilerplate reply.

by: Katanai
If that's what you think would be better try and contact Asus then. There really isn't any company better suited for that other than Intel...
Ditto for Asus' response.
Posted on Reply
#18
Katanai
by: qubit
Have you actually seen LightBoost on the desktop? No? Then you have no idea. It strobes so fast (120Hz) that it doesn't get in the way at all while providing the benefits I described. Come back to me when you've seen it for yourself and can speak from experience.
Hey man why are you attacking me? I was only trying to help. Techpowerup really has become a place where you cannot have a decent conversation without ad hominem attacks. Please re read my posts. Please tell me in which one of them was I aggressive towards you?
Posted on Reply
#19
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
by: Katanai
Hey man why are you attacking me? I was only trying to help. Techpowerup really has become a place where you cannot have a decent conversation without ad hominem attacks. Please re read my posts. Please tell me in which one of them was I aggressive towards you?
Hey man, I'm not attacking you! :)

You're insisting that a regular backlight is better than an LB one without having seen it. Therefore, I think you should see it for yourself and then you'll be able to talk about it properly.

Generally speaking, I know what you mean about personal attacks on TPU though. :ohwell:
Posted on Reply
#20
Katanai
by: Katanai
There is less of it that's why you don't notice it.
by: qubit
It strobes so fast (120Hz) that it doesn't get in the way at all while providing the benefits I described.
If you think about these two sentences for a minute you will see that they don't contradict themselves at all. So it seems that, yeah, maybe I do have an idea about this. Also I have not seen LightBoost technology on a desktop but I used to look at a 120Hz desktop all the time on my old CRT and yeah it was much better than 60Hz but it still wasn't perfect for text. There are also more aspects to this than this thing alone. I bet that you are currently shortening the lifespan of your monitor a lot by doing this...
Posted on Reply
#21
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
by: Katanai
If you think about these two sentences for a minute you will see that they don't contradict themselves at all. So it seems that, yeah, maybe I do have an idea about this. Also I have not seen LightBoost technology on a desktop but I used to look at a 120Hz desktop all the time on my old CRT and yeah it was much better than 60Hz but it still wasn't perfect for text. There are also more aspects to this than this thing alone. I bet that you are currently shortening the lifespan of your monitor a lot by doing this...
Ok, I can see where you're going wrong.

You can't compare the light output of an LCD monitor to that of a CRT, because of the way that light is produced (electrons hitting phosphors to make them glow isn't especially easy on the eyes partly because it has a bit of ultraviolet light coming off it). A CRT will inherently cause eyestrain, while an LCD backlight does not (don't turn it up too brightly). Hence, you could have a 1000Hz refresh on a CRT and it will still fatigue you eventually; glowing phosphors just aren't that easy on the eyes.

Hence, a 120Hz flashing backlight doesn't tire you out - I can speak about this from over a month's experience with it.

Where did you get the idea that turning on LB shortens the life of the monitor? Even if it does, it's well worth it! :D

Anyway, what CRT monitor did you have that gave you a sharp picture at 120Hz at a decent resolution? Must have been pretty high end. Heck, even the analog VGA output of a graphics card doesn't look especially sharp at that speed.
Posted on Reply
#22
Katanai
by: qubit

Anyway, what CRT monitor did you have that gave you a sharp picture at 120Hz at a decent resolution? Must have been pretty high end. Heck, even the analog VGA output of a graphics card doesn't look especially sharp at that speed.
Yeah, now that I think about it I think it was 100Hz I do remember it supported 120Hz and I tested it at that speed but like you said you had to turn down the resolution too much. It was practically a Sony Trinitron but rebranded by Dell. About the lifespan, well yeah, that's kinda the worst thing you can do to any electrical circuit, turn it on and off very fast. If this happens 120 times every second it might be a problem if it was not designed to handle it for long periods of time...

...I think this is one of the main reasons that an Nvidia certification is needed.

So your monitor might be certified to do this but only for limited periods of time, while playing 3D content. Now that you're using it all the time like this it will shorten its lifespan, by a lot I think...
Posted on Reply
#23
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
Yes, it's a LightBoost monitor which is an NVIDIA proprietary standard, so of course it's certified.

Once again, where do you get this idea for a limited time only? What if someone plays games in 3D mode a whole lot? I think you're plucking that out of thin air just like the rest of your arguments.

120Hz oscillation is nothing for modern electronic circuits. Heck, your CPU oscillates billions of times a second and lasts for years!
Posted on Reply
#24
Kreij
Senior Monkey Moderator
@Katanai : Please use the edit function to add to posts instead of double and triple posting.
Thank You.
Posted on Reply
#25
Katanai
by: qubit

120Hz oscillation is nothing for modern electronic circuits. Heck, your CPU oscillates billions of times a second and lasts for years!
Dude ffs! Why do you think Intel said that overclocking voids your warranty? Exactly because it shortens the lifespan of your CPU!!! A CPU is designed to work between certain limits. Guess what TurboBoost is now? It overclocks your CPU for a certain amount of time because of thermal concerns and because of this. Your monitor is designed to work exactly like that. For certain amounts of time. No matter how much you play a game you won't be playing it 24/7. What's so hard to understand? I am not saying your monitor will blow up because of this I am saying it will break faster because of it...

But whatever. Everything you say on TPU must and will be turned into a long argument it seems, in which you will be attacked for expressing an opinion. Especially if you're trying to help out...
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